AAPT.org - American Association of Physics Teachers

Workshops 

Listed below is a current list of workshops planned for the 2012 summer meeting.  Some details are subject to change.  All workshops, will be held at the Univiersity of Pennsylvania.

Save a workshop from cancellation: Register at least 3 weeks ahead! Get a friend to register!

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  • T01: Research-based Teaching Strategies to Close the Gap

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Burrow Kruezter

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Andrew Boudreaux

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 7

    Over the past several decades, physics education research (PER) has identified a deficit in the ability of traditional instruction to promote coherent conceptual understanding of topics in introductory physics. Our preliminary study found that when recommendations from educational psychology were introduced the gender gap disappeared. In this workshop we will discuss and model these recommendations as well as working in small groups to brainstorm different techniques to utilize the recommendations with students.

  • W01: Building Scientific Apparatus and Invention Prototypes

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Randy Tagg

    Cost

    • Members: $105
    • Non-members: $130

    Seats

    • Max: 12
    • Available: 0

    A variety of resources and skills are needed to build scientific apparatus and to develop prototypes for inventions. These include mechanical design, use of motors and other actuators, analog and digital electronics, and optics. Learning such skills is an excellent way to merge physics with real-world applications and to widen the realm of experiments achievable by students and teachers. The workshop will give a "grand tour" of the practical knowledge for such prototyping and point to pathways for further development, including ideas about how to incorporate such training into curriculum at both high school and college levels. Examples will be drawn from student & teacher research projects as well as experience in running a community prototyping center. Participants are encouraged to contribute some of their own prototyping objectives for discussion.

  • W02: Grant Writing

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Paula Engelhardt

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Ellie Sayre, Warren Christensen

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 11

    This workshop is intended for individuals who are in their last year of graduate school, in a post-doctoral position, or are new faculty members. The workshop will focus on navigating the National Science Foundation (NSF) website, finding alterative funding sources such as Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) and state and local funding agencies, and preparing the grant proposal. Tips and suggestions for developing ideas and seeing them through to the development of the grant proposal will be discussed. Participants are encouraged to bring with them grant ideas to discuss with the group.

  • W03: Learning Physics While Practicing Science

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Eugenia Etkina

    Co-Organizer(s)

    David Brookes, Alan Van Heuvelen

    Cost

    • Members: $95
    • Non-members: $120

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 0

    Participants* will learn how to modify introductory physics courses to help students acquire a good conceptual foundation, apply this knowledge effectively in problem solving, and develop the science process abilities needed for real life work. We provide tested curriculum materials including: The Physics Active Learning Guide with 30 or more activities per textbook chapter for use with any textbook in lectures, recitations and homework; (b) a website with over 200 videotaped experiments and associated questions for use in lectures, recitations, laboratories, and homework; and (c) a set of labs with inexpensive equipment that can be used to construct, test and apply concepts to solve practical problems. During the workshop we will illustrate how to use the materials not only in college and high school physics courses but also in courses for future physics teachers to have an explicit emphasis on using the processes of science and various cognitive strategies. *Participants who own laptops should bring them to the workshop. The computer should have Quicktime installed. If you do not own a computer, you will be paired with somebody who does.

  • W04: Make, Take, and Do: Homemade Physics Equipment

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Tom Senior

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Pat Callahan, George Amann, Al Gibson

    Cost

    • Members: $95
    • Non-members: $120

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 0

    A chance to make apparatus tested and approved by the PTRA's over the years of the program. We will make a Soda Can Van de Graaff, a holiday light circuit puzzle, a color addition ping pong ball, a pendulum wave machine for the desk or overhead, a homopolar motor, and several other items. Brush up on some simple soldering and other skills useful in the physics class. All items will be easily transported home.

  • W05: Physics By Design

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Julia Olson

    Cost

    • Members: $108
    • Non-members: $133

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 10

    What is understanding? What is the relationship between knowledge and understanding? What does "teaching for understanding" look like in the physics classroom? How can we implement reformed teaching along with new standards? These and other important questions will be explored as participants design, develop and refine a cohesive unit plan based on the principles found in Understanding by Design (UbD). In the UbD classroom, there are high expectations and incentives for all students while exploration of big ideas and essential questions is differentiated, so students who are able delve more deeply into the subject matter than others. This workshop is appropriate for instructors from pre-high school through college levels. Participants will receive a copy of UbD, 2nd Ed. Note: participants are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptops to the workshop.

  • W06: PIRA Lecture Demonstration I

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dale Stille & Sam Sampere

    Cost

    • Members: $115
    • Non-members: $140

    Seats

    • Max: 50
    • Available: 2

    Topics in this workshop cover the standard first semester of physics instruction from Mechanics to Thermal. It is taught by an experienced team of lecture demonstrators. The format allows for and encourages interplay between instructors and participants. It is recommended that both Lecture Demonstrations 1 and 2 be taken as this will cover the complete year of demonstrations needed for a typical course. The demonstrations used and exhibited will be based on, but not limited to, the PIRA top 200 list of demonstrations. See http://www.pira-online.org for more info on this list. Please note that this workshop is intended to expose as many demonstrations and ideas as possible to the participants. Since we will be doing approximately 100 demos during this workshop, time restraints DO NOT allow for extensive or in depth discussions of each demonstration. We will make every effort to answer all questions and concerns.

  • W07: Van de Graaff Repair

    This workshop has been canceled by the Workshop Leader

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jerry Hester

    Cost

    • Members: $105
    • Non-members: $130

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Topics in this workshop cover the operation, theory, cleaning, and maintenance of Van deGraaff Electrostatic Generators. It is taught by an experienced team of lecture demonstrators. The format allows for and encourages interplay between instructors and participants. This workshop is aimed at those who may have seldom used or unused Van deGraaff generators sitting on their shelves because they don?t function properly. Participants are encouraged to bring their Van deGraaff generators and we will attempt to solve the problems that may be occurring and teach participants how to perform needed maintenance themselves. We will make every effort to answer all questions and concerns either during or after the workshop.

  • W08: LivePhoto Physics: Advanced Projects with Video Analysis

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Aaron Titus

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Bob Teese, Pat Cooney

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 1

    Video analysis is now being used in many ways in introductory physics courses. For example, teachers and students have been analyzing their own high-speed videos or determining whether various YouTube videos or animated games such as Angry Birds are realistic. Many exciting new uses of video analysis require advanced techniques. In this workshop, participants will learn how to capture video segments from games and how to use advanced features in Tracker or Logger Pro video analysis software. Advanced techniques include measuring relative motion, compensating for panning and zooming, or dealing with non-standard frame rates. (Familiarity with basic video analysis is assumed.)

  • W09: CASTLE Workshop - Model Building Investigations of Electromagnetic Field Production and Transformer Operation

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dick Feren

    Cost

    • Members: $85
    • Non-members: $110

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 4

    Participants will explore complex concepts using simple equipment in straightforward experiments designed to promote image-based understanding of electromagnetic field concepts that are usually developed mathematically. These include using a portable radio to detect an electric field radiated by accelerating charge when a current is turned on or off; using shaped-wire circuits to show that magnetic fields of turned-on current contain energy that radiation carries to the radio; using a transformer with a variable iron core as a dimmer and brightener for a bulb at the output. The current detected in the coil with the moving magnet, and the changing output of the transformer with the variable core are both predicted by Faraday's Law.

  • W10: "Hands-on" on the Road

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Richard Flarend

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Pati Sievert, Northern Illinois University Outreach

    Cost

    • Members: $95
    • Non-members: $120

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 10

    Come to this workshop and learn more about hands-on activities suitable for outreach and road programs for a variety of age ranges. Some activities are great for your classroom too. Of course, you will also do the activities yourself! Some activities are great for young kids, while others are for older kids. Activities will come from five different outreach programs in the areas of Electricity, Magnetism, Optics, Lasers, and Sound. Ideas based on experience with thousands of kids will also be presented about how to manage equipment and groups of children with your own "Hands-on" on the road program.

  • W11: New RealTime Physics and Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tools and Curricula: Video Analysis, Clickers and E&M Labs

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    David Sokoloff

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Priscilla Laws, Dickinson College Ronald Thornton, Tufts University

    Cost

    • Members:
    • Non-members:

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 0

    RealTime Physics (RTP) and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) have been available for over 15 years--so what's new? The just released Third Edition of RTP includes five new labs on basic electricity and magnetism in Module 3 as well a new approach to projectile motion in Module 1. Some of these new labs make use of video analysis. Also new are clicker-based ILDs. This hands-on workshop is designed for those who want to make effective use of active learning with computer-based tools in their introductory courses. These active learning approaches for lectures, labs, and recitations (tutorials) are based on physics education research (PER). Participants will work with new activities as well as original ones. The following will be distributed: Modules from the Third Edition of RTP, the ILD book, the Physics with Video Analysis book and CD, and Teaching Physics with the Physics Suite by E.F. Redish. Partially supported by the National Science Foundation. Organizer: David Sokoloff and Co-Organizers: Ronald K. Thornton, Tufts University Priscilla W. Laws, Dickinson College.

  • W12: Teaching Physics in Urban Schools

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dan Smith

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Katemari Rosa, Columbia University; Katya Denisova, Baltimore City Public Schools; Angela M. Kelly, Stony Brook University

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 4

    Urban educators who have taught high school physics in some of the toughest environments in the U.S. (New York City, and Baltimore, MD) will share their challenges and successes in this workshop. Workshop participants will be presented with activities that have engaged student interest as well as the strategies for developing their own activities. In addition, a panel presentation will serve as the springboard for a discussion of extra-curricula difficulties and how to confront them.

  • W13: Using FPGAs in the Digital Lab

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kurt Wick

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 16
    • Available: 0

    As part of an advanced lab course students are exposed to the basics of analog and digital electronics. In the last few years the physical implementation of digital circuits has moved away from the traditional application specific standard products (ASSPs), such as the 4000 or 7400 series chips, towards Field Programmable Gate-Arrays (FPGAs) and Complex Programmable Logic Devices (CPLDs). This workshop covers the experience of converting the 3-week digital logic lab segment of an advanced lab course from ASSPs towards FPGAs. Educational hardware and software, options of programming the devices and some lab exercises and applications suitable for such a lab course are presented. As demonstration and practice, the participants will use their laptops to program and interface the devices. A basic knowledge of digital logic will be assumed.

  • W14: Ben Franklin is My Lab Partner

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Robert Morse

    Cost

    • Members: $72
    • Non-members: $97

    Seats

    • Max: 18
    • Available: 0

    Benjamin Franklin's experiments and observations on electricity established not only his reputation as a scientist, but also our electrical conventions and vocabulary, and the principle of charge conservation. In his letters, Franklin builds, test, and defends his model with skill and eloquence, arguing from experiment and sharing both his wisdom and doubts, while clearly conveying his fascination with electricity. As Franklin was not formally schooled in mathematics, his theory was qualitative, and is an approachable example of hands-on and minds-on construction of a conceptual model with significant explanatory power. In this workshop, developed by the author at the Wright Center for Science Teaching at Tufts University, working with Franklin's descriptions, we will recreate many of his experiments using modern, inexpensive equipment. Participants will receive equipment and a CD-ROM containing the workshop manual, a collection of Franklin's letters relating to electricity, and movie clips illustrating the experiments.

  • W15: Introductory Laboratories

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Mary Ann Klassen and Scott Shelley

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Scott Shelley, Haverford College

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 0

    Whether your lab curriculum is ripe for an overhaul or well-established, this workshop will provide new ideas to bring home to your institution. Six presenters from colleges and universities across the United States will each demonstrate their approach to a favorite introductory lab exercise. Attendees will have the opportunity to work with each apparatus. Documentation will be provided for each experiment, with lab manuals, sample data, equipment lists, and construction or purchase information. This workshop is appropriate primarily for college and university instructional laboratory developers.

  • W16: Labs Experiments that (can) Re-appear Across the Curriculum

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Paul Dolan

    Cost

    • Members: $100
    • Non-members: $125

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 6

    Do your favorite lab at any level in the curriculum! This workshop will provide participants with hands-on experience working with equipment from several physics lab exercises that can be adapted to being done at many different levels of the curriculum, potentially from Middle School to the Advanced Lab, thus moving the 'spiral curriculum' from the lecture into the lab. Participants will cycle through the various stations to optimize their 'hands-on' time. Documentation will be provided for each experiment with sample data, equipment lists, and construction or purchase info. Possible topics include (but are not limited to): the pendulum (in its many various forms), the ballistic pendulum, granular materials, lenses & image formation, NanoTech, and examples of exponential growth & decay, such as population simulations & radiation/counting. The presentations will be active & interactive.

  • W17: Modeling Physics for University Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Eric Brewe

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 0

    Modeling Instruction is a pedagogical approach to university-level physics that focuses on model development and testing. The Physics Education Research Group at Florida International University has been implementing Modeling Instruction for university physics for the past 10 years. This workshop presents a university version of Modeling Instruction curriculum for the mechanics semester of introductory physics. Participants will engage in inquiry activities that focus on building qualitative and quantitative models, explore the curriculum materials available on an instructional CD, and explore video examples from the Modeling Instruction classroom. Participants in this workshop will receive a CD with weekly planning guides for one semester of introductory physics, activities designed for students, and video clips for instructor use. Participants are encouraged to bring laptop computers to this workshop.

  • W18: Science and Religion: Teaching Critical Thinking

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Paul Nienaber

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Matthew B. Koss, College of the Holy Cross

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 18

    Recent interchanges between science and religion have sparked serious interest and no little heat. Science educators have an investment in these discussions, not just because they impact public school curricular policy - curious students and colleagues often raise questions whose answers require examining subtle distinctions. This workshop seeks to map out a particular approach to the discourse, an explorative juxtaposition of fundamental (and sometimes deeply implicit) characteristics of the two principal disciplines (science and theology). The intent is not to exhaustively survey the current literature, nor to demolish or advocate particular positions. The aim, rather, is to provide an opportunity for participants and presenters to interact in a number of guided discussions and activities on this topic. These directed engagements will help construct a framework that the presenters feel will permit participants to address the issues more productively, and to open avenues to better help students develop critical thinking skills.

  • W19: Skepticism in the Classroom

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 28
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dean Baird

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Matt Lowry, College of Lake County

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 32
    • Available: 6

    We will present a variety of lessons, appropriate for the physics classroom, that focus on the skeptical and critical thinking nature of science. Some lessons involve obvious physics content; some bring in examples from the real world. Participants will get ready-to-use lessons and resources designed to bring healthy, scientific skepticism to their classrooms. Topics include fire walking, ghosts and angels, balance bracelets, back masking, the credulity of local media, woo at school, and more.

  • W20: PIRA Lecture Demonstration II

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dale Stille & Sam Sampere

    Cost

    • Members: $115
    • Non-members: $140

    Seats

    • Max: 50
    • Available: 38

    Topics in this workshop cover the standard second semester of physics instruction from E&M to Modern plus Astronomy. It is taught by an experienced team of lecture demonstrators. The format allows for and encourages interplay between instructors and participants. It is recommended that both Lecture Demonstrations 1 and 2 be taken as this will cover the complete year of demonstrations needed for a typical course. The demonstrations used and exhibited will be based on, but not limited to, the PIRA top 200 list of demonstrations. See http://www.pira-online.org for more info on this list. Please note that this workshop is intended to expose as many demonstrations and ideas as possible to the participants. Since we will be doing approximately 100 demos during this workshop, time restraints DO NOT allow for extensive or in depth discussions of each demonstration. We will make every effort to answer all questions and concerns.

  • W21: The Physics of Energy

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Abigail Mechtenberg

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Regina Barrera, Lee College

    Cost

    • Members: $110
    • Non-members: $135

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 16

    Educators from US HSs, TYCs and colleges/universities adapt this Physics of Energy workshop for experimental and theoretical Science, Technology, and Society (STS) curriculum. Whether motivated by energy security or environmental stability, physicists at all levels must play a role in the scientific literacy shaping the past as we have known it and the future of the world as we should know it. The academic level is set for undergraduate engineers and physicists; however, the astute teacher can easily apply this to other students. During the workshop ten laboratories will be executed in groups (starting with cookbook to inquiry through a hybrid approach), project-based implementation. All participants will leave with a CD of resources. Together the workshop will weave a coherent common thread for our Physics of Energy from mechanical to electrical energy, thermal to electrical, solar to electrical, and chemical to electrical energy.

  • W22: UTeach Observation Protocol (UTOP)

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Mary Walker

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Candace Walkington, Monica Plisch

    Cost

    • Members: $90
    • Non-members: $115

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 4

    The UTeach Observation Protocol (UTOP) is an instrument to observe the classroom practices of inservice teachers. It is based on the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) and the Inside the Classroom instruments of Horizon Research. This workshop will provide training on how to use the UTOP to assess pedagogical practices shown by research to improve student learning.

  • W23: Computation and the Modeling Curriculum

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Michael Schatz

    Co-Organizer(s)

    John Burk, The Westminster Schools; John Aiken, Georgia State University,

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 10
    • Available: 0

    This workshop will describe methods for enhancing Modeling Instruction in High School Physics with curricular materials that teach computation (i.e., teach students to simulate, to visualize and to solve physics problems using the computer). The computation curricular materials are based on the easy-to-learn and use VPython environment; no prior programming experience is assumed or required (either for the workshop or for classroom use). The workshop focuses on computation applied to force and motion; the materials are suitable for any high school physics course ranging from algebra based physics through AP Physics. The workshop offers the opportunity to become part of a growing community of instructors, who are helping students develop Computational Thinking skills (like computational physics) that are a vital part of all professional STEM disciplines in the 21st century.

  • W24: Physics Union Mathematics: Science Processes and Mathematical Reasoning

    This workshop has been canceled by the Workshop Leader

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Eugenia Etkina

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Suzanne Brahmia, James Finley, Joe Santonacita

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    Workshop participants will learn how to use Physics Union Mathematics (PUM) materials. PUM (http://pum.rutgers.edu) is a new curriculum that spans through middle school and high school and attempts to bridge the gap between physics and mathematics. It is based on the Investigative Science Learning Environment system (ISLE) that was found to help students learn physics and develop scientific abilities at the college level. The main feature of ISLE is that students learn physics by mirroring the processes physicists use to construct knowledge (some of those are experimental design and reasoning with multiple representations). PUM materials can be used in middle school physical science, Physics First, College Prep, Honors and AP physics. We provide 9 modules broken into individual lessons with homeworks, daily assessments, final tests, and a website with more that 200 videotaped experiments and supporting questions. Modules can be used with any textbook.

  • W25: Real-time Assessments of Student Understanding

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Scott Franklin

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Eleanor Sayre

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 0

    This workshop will introduce participants to RAWR, the Rapid Assessment and Web Reports system that allows instructors to get real-time assessment of student understanding. Ideal for larger class sizes, but suitable for all, RAWR administers a between-student testing of physics concepts that compares the results of one group of students at one time with that of another at a later time. Faculty can see when students begin to forget prior knowledge, and adjust their methods accordingly. Faculty can choose from a large set of validated concept questions or generate their own to be incorporated into the database. Results are presented to faculty in multiple forms, and are can assist Just-in-Time-Teaching methods. Workshop participants will learn the philosophy behind the between-students method and get hands-on experience with the RAWR interface, and so will be fully capable of implementing RAWR testing, if they so desire, in the coming Fall term.

  • W26: PRISMS - A High School Physics Curriculum

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Lawrence Escalada

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Alison A. Beharka, University of Northern Iowa

    Cost

    • Members: $145
    • Non-members: $170

    Seats

    • Max: 15
    • Available: 3

    Physics Resources and Instructional Strategies for Motivating Students (PRISMS) is a high school physics curriculum and professional development program that utilizes a learning cycle pedagogy. The PRISMS curriculum has been used extensively in UNI teacher preparation and professional development. The original PRISMS materials were a collection of 130 high interest activities related to the real-life experiences of high school physics students designed to develop student conceptual understanding and to cultivate student scientific reasoning and problem skills. The enhanced and revised version, called PRISMS PLUS, focuses on complete learning cycles that provide fully integrated experiences that enable students to develop not only their problem solving and inquiry skills but also deep, long-lasting understanding of physics concepts. Participants will be introduced to PRISMS PLUS and work through a number of learning cycles. Participants will engage in discussions how the curriculum can be implemented in various high school physics classrooms.

  • W27: Activities for Teaching about Weather and Climate

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Brian Jones

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Paul Williams, Austin Community College

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 9

    During the day, the earth is warmed by sunlight that shines on it. This is something that your students can see, something that they can feel. But, over the course of a day, the surface of the earth receives more radiant energy from the bottoms of clouds and the lower atmosphere than it does from the sun. This influence of thermal radiation is critically important for an understanding of the earth?s climate and how it is changing. In this workshop we?ll share activities that make this invisible form of energy transfer tangible. We'll also share activities that illuminate other important but complex concepts, such as how climate models work, how feedbacks - both positive and negative - affect the climate. Our goal is to give you a set of tools to give your students a real understanding of the earth's climate and how scientists predict its development in the future.

  • W28: Can You Teach Radioactivity Using Inquiry? Yes!

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Andy Johnson

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 5

    High school or beginning college students can develop meaningful understandings of radioactivity via inquiry! The NSF-supported Inquiry-Based Radiation project has developed a coherent set of over 35 hours of inquiry materials. Topics include basic properties of ionizing radiation, the origins of radiation, interaction of radiation with matter (including health effects), half lives and nuclear waste. These research-based materials resolve numerous student difficulties that we have identified through repeated classroom trials, observations, and interviews with students. Notable problems addressed include differentiating radiation from its source(!), EM vs. ionizing radiation, the behavior and structure of atoms, the process of ionization by radiation, zoom scale thinking, interaction of radiation with matter, and the meaning/microscopic basis of half life. Participants will get a flavor of the materials, learn about learning issues and receive electronic copies of the full current version including homework, teacher information, and three fun and powerful simulators.

  • W29: ClassAction: Interactive Classroom Materials for Introductory Astronomy

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kevin Lee

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Todd S. Young, Wayne State

    Cost

    • Members: $30
    • Non-members: $55

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 10

    Educational research has clearly defined the characteristics of the optimal introductory astronomy classroom -one where students are actively engaged in the learning process and frequently receiving timely feedback on their learning progress. The NSF-funded ClassAction project is a computer database of Think-Pair-Share questions designed to be projected in the classroom for student voting and discussion. Instructors have the capability to recast these questions into alternate forms based on their own preferences and formative feedback from the class. The questions are accompanied by simulations and other resources for providing feedback. This workshop will provide teachers with hands-on experience using ClassAction materials and present lessons we have learned about the most effective ways to engage students. All materials will be disseminated through the web (http://astro.unl.edu) before the workshop and attendees will bring their own laptops with the software already installed.

  • W30: How to Make Significant and Lasting Changes In Your Introductory Physics for Life Science Course

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dawn Meredith

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Joe Redish, University of Maryland; Catherine Crouch, Swarthmore College; Nancy Beverly, Mercy College; Eric Anderson and Lili Cui University of Maryland, Baltimore County; James Vesenka, University of New England

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 35
    • Available: 0

    In recent years there has been much activity focused on major changes in the introductory course for life science students. Prompted by several national policy documents (e.g. Bio 2010 and proposed changes in medical school admissions criteria), changes in the course are aimed at creating a curriculum better suited to the needs and interests of life science students. In this workshop several educators who have been working on this problem will share resources and ideas (rich biology based problems, texts and lectures; rethinking topic coverage; fundamental differences between biology and physics that must be acknowledged; and institutional challenges to change).Co-presenters: Joe Redish (University of Maryland), Catherine Crouch (Swarthmore College), Nancy Beverly (Mercy College), and Eric Anderson and Lili Cui (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), James Vesenka (University of New England).

  • W31: From Ptolemy to Einstein: Using Computer Simulations in Astronomy

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Mario Belloni

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Wolfgang Christian, Todd Timberlake

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 7

    One of the most popular courses in physics is astronomy. However, the topics taught require visualizations that are not familiar to the typical students in these courses. To address this issue, we have created a set of flexible resources for the teaching of introductory astronomy based on two- and three-dimensional simulations. These simulations are created with Easy Java Simulations (EJS) which is a free and open source tool for creating Java simulations. Because EJS allows teachers to easily change simulations, existing simulations can be customized to the type of astronomy course one is teaching. In this workshop, we will describe how to use and modify astronomy simulations such as the celestial sphere, Ptolemaic and Copernican models, Keplerian orbits including eclipses, galactic collisions, and orbits about black holes. All of these materials will be distributed on a CD but are also available on the OSP Collection on the ComPADRE digital library.

  • W32: Sound & Music, Ways to Teach It (Free Kit !)

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Wendy Adams

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 0

    The Acoustical Society of America is proud to offer a "Sound and Music Activity Kit" free to K-12 teachers. The kit includes ten tuning forks (frequencies chosen to address a range of learning goals), a sound level meter, four laminated posters of the inner ear and hair cells (healthy and damaged), ping pong balls, fuzzy sticks, straws and 15 research-based, interactive, student-tested lessons which have been developed to use with the Activity Kit materials. These lessons have been reviewed by the AAPT PTRAs (Physics Teacher Resource Agents). There are lessons that are appropriate for a range of levels K-14. Topics include, but are not limited to, how sound is produced, the basics of waves, how musical instruments work, echolocation, the Doppler effect and Sound Labs. In this workshop the introductory lesson will be demonstrated and we will work with several of the hands-on portions of additional lessons.

  • W33: PTRA Workshop: Using Children's Literature to Teach Science

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Nina Morley Daye

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Nina Morley Daye

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 26
    • Available: 8

    Storytime is a magic time - a time of amazement and imagination for pre school-ers to high school-ers (and for many lucky adults) The magic unleashed in children?s literature should not disappear when the story is completed. We can bridge the gap from story to experiment by asking "I wonder if ?..." Then investigate those predictions with hands-on activities that capitalize on this magic. This workshop will explore how we can use children?s literature at a number of different levels. Whether we are working with pre service or practicing elementary teachers or our own physics students, children?s books provide a spring board to science investigations, a way to model the processes of science and even serve as assessment for our instruction. The workshop will be hands on and interactive. Participants will receive a DVD of activities, book and topic pairings, children?s literature resources, bibliographies, websites and lesson plans.

  • W34: A Kaleidoscope of Free and Easy Web Tools for Teachers

    This workshop has been canceled by the Workshop Leader

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Cathy Ezrailson

    Cost

    • Members: $62
    • Non-members: $87

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    Educators have more opportunities than ever to begin teaching in today's "smart environments" through e-texts, simulations, and today's emerging and "customizable" web-tools. Especially since web-based tools can also be pressed into service in order to organize, design, and assess learning. This workshop is one opportunity to access, investigate and begin to apply a few of these resources in your courses. Most of these tools and applications are free on the web, easy to grasp and implement. Coupled with a course redesign, implementation could markedly enhance your course and communication with students. This workshop aims to help you to model, create and gain experience with some of these free tools. Ezrailson, C. M. (2011, Aug) Web Tech Tools for Teachers. AAPT Summer Meeting, Omaha, NE. Ezrailson, C. M. (2010, Feb). Tech Tool Savvy for Physics Teachers. AAPT Winter Meeting, Washington, DC.

  • W35: Simple Experiments for Learning the Strategies That Mirror Scientific Practice

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Gorazd Planinsic

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 3

    This is a hands-on workshop designed for teachers interested in using Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE) system to engage students in practical work that mirrors scientific practice and thus helps them develop scientific habits of mind. Creation of successful practical ISLE problems relies on finding suitable experiments. The key features of such experiments are that they are simple, easy to build, that they allow students to construct multiple explanations within the accessible curriculum domain and that they provide opportunities for the students to actively experience how experiment and theory are interwound. Obviously the requirements are tough and therefore it is understandable why such experiments are not easy to find. In the workshop participants will be solving different problems based on simple experiments using ISLE approach. Participants will work in rotating groups. At the end there will be a discussion about the results.

  • W36: Advanced & Intermediate Laboratories

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Van Bistrow

    Cost

    • Members: $95
    • Non-members: $120

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 3

    This workshop is appropriate for college and university instructional laboratory developers. At each of six stations, presenters will demonstrate an approach to an intermediate or advanced laboratory exercise. Each presenter will show and discuss the apparatus and techniques used. Attendees will cycle through the stations and have an opportunity to use each apparatus. Documentation will be provided for each experiment, with sample data, equipment lists, and construction or purchase information.

  • W37: Biology-Inspired Labs for Introductory Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Nancy Beverly

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Juan Rodriguez, Phillip Lockett Sytil Murphy, Dyan McBride, Sathappan Ramesh

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 0

    There is a growing need for introductory physics laboratory activities that allow life science students to explore and deepen their understanding of physics through biological contexts such as physiology, biomechanics, biophysics, and medicine. Individuals and groups who have been developing such introductory laboratory activities will present examples from their labs. After an initial overview by the presenters, participants will break into rotating groups for hands-on experience with laboratory activities and more detailed discussion with each presenter about the pertinent pedagogy and apparatus. A flash drive with resources for the laboratory activities will be given to the participants.

  • W38: Cosmology in the Classroom

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Daniel Smith

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Kim Coble, Chicago State University

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 3

    Recently, powerful observations and advances in computation and visualization have led to a revolution in our understanding of the structure, composition, and evolution of the universe. Experts should not be the only ones, however, who understand the physics and data that provide overwhelming evidence for big bang cosmology and its dark matter-dark energy extensions. The first part of the workshop will introduce participants to (1) results of our research on common alternate student conceptions in cosmology, and (2) a sample of interactive web-based exercises from a curriculum designed to help students master the scientific concepts and processes that led to our current understanding of the universe. In the second part of the workshop we will present classroom-tested labs on the Large Scale Structure, featuring data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Participants should bring their own laptops with spreadsheet software and Adobe Flash installed.

  • W39: Free Online Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics, with Powerful Problem Solving Pedagogy

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dave Pritchard

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Saif Rayyan, MIT; Daniel Seaton, MIT; Yoav Bergner, MIT;Raluca teodorescu, GWU; Andrew Pawl, UW-Platteville

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 2

    Use our Integrated Environment for Mechanics (ILEM) in your next mechanics course. Hosted in LON-CAPA, an open source online learning system, ILEM combines multi-level research-based homework sets with an online e-text and discussion boards, and will have a physics library with about 10,000 problems indexed by topic and difficulty that can recommend additional problems like one you like. The system can measure the skill of your students regardless of which particular problems they actually do. This system can implement our successful Modeling Applied to Problem Solving pedagogy that generates problem-solving skills that transfer to a subsequent E&M course. Students also develop more expert-like attitudes towards science, particularly in problem-solving self confidence. Workshop participants should bring a laptop to explore some or all of these features, sample the various teaching materials for in-class use, and participate in innovative activities. We seek users/collaborators for generating/improving open source materials.

  • W40: Heliophysics Applications for Physics Teaching

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Mary Kadooka

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Katie Whitman

    Cost

    • Members: $10
    • Non-members: $35

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 15

    Our sun has numerous applications for teaching physics such as how the solar wind affects our magnetosphere to interactions of charged particles in space. It provides a wealth of fascinating resources to stimulate student interest and increase motivation to learn physics. From the twisting magnetic field lines of sunspots resulting in solar flares and coronal mass ejections that can cause blackouts on Earth, you will learn about the sun's central role in space weather. Complementing this background knowledge will be activities using images from the NASA Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) developed by physics teachers and heliophysicists. You will use JHelioviewer, a database of sun images, that will stimulate your thinking to enable you to create your own lessons. Check out http://c2h2.ifa.hawaii.edu for more information about the group sponsoring this workshop.

  • W41: K-12 Teacher Preparation and Professional Development*

    This workshop has been canceled by the Workshop Leader

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Paula Heron, Lillian McDermott

    Cost

    • Members: $85
    • Non-members: $110

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    The UW Physics Education Group has been developing research-based and research-validated instructional materials for use with K-12 teachers. Physics by Inquiry (PbI), which has been widely implemented, helps teachers develop scientific concepts and reasoning skills from their own observations.1 Drawing on our experience with Tutorials in Introductory Physics, we are developing a supplement to PbI to help experienced teachers identify and address specific student difficulties.2 University faculty and K-12 teachers will work through sample materials and participate in a discussion on implementation 1L.C. McDermott and the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, Physics by Inquiry (John Wiley & Sons, inc., 1996). 2 L.C. McDermott, P.S. Shaffer and the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, Tutorials in Introductory Physics (Pearson Education, Inc., 2002). *This work has been supported in part by NSF grants: DRK-12 #0733276 and CCLI #1022449

  • W42: LEAP: Learner-Centered Environment for Algebra-based Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Paula Engelhardt

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Steve Robinson

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 0

    The Learner-centered Environment for Algebra-based Physics (LEAP) is a newly developed, two semester physics curriculum for algebra-based physics. The course pedagogy and activity sequence is guided by research on student learning of physics and builds on the work of the NSF supported project, Physics for Everyday Thinking (PET). Students work in groups to develop their understanding of various physics phenomena including forces, energy, electricity and magnetism, light and optics. Students utilize hands-on experiments and computer simulations to provide evidence to support their conceptual understanding. Traditional problem solving is scaffolded by using the S.E.N.S.E. problem solving strategy. During this workshop, participants will be introduced to the LEAP curriculum and S.E.N.S.E. problem solving strategy, will examine and work through a sample of the types of activities students do and view video from the college LEAP classroom. *Supported in part by NSF CCLI grant #DUE-0737324

  • W43: Physics and Toys II: Energy, Momentum, Electricity, and Magnetism

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Beverly Taylor

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Raymond Turner

    Cost

    • Members: $62
    • Non-members: $87

    Seats

    • Max: 36
    • Available: 0

    This hands-on workshop is designed for teachers at all levels in search of fun physics demonstrations, lab experiments, and interactive materials through the use of ordinary children's toys. More than 50 toys will be demonstrated, and the physical principles related to these toys will be discussed. The workshop will concentrate on toys that illustrate the concepts of kinetic and potential energy, linear and angular momentum, electricity, magnetism, pressure, temperature and properties of materials. You will have the opportunity to participate in both qualitative and quantitative investigations using toys. The workshop leaders have found that toys can be utilized at all grade levels from kindergarten through college by varying the sophistication of the analysis. These same toys can be used for informal presentations to public groups of all ages, whether children or adults.

  • W44: Seeking Employment in Academia

    This workshop has been canceled by the Workshop Leader

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Sytil Murphy

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Applying for career in academia can be an art form. You have to catch the eye of the employer based on a few pages of written words. You must be able to interpret the ad, gather pertinent information quickly, and tailor your materials to the position. There are many questions such as how long, personal, specific, etc. your materials should be. How should you tailor materials when applying to a field specific position versus a general announcement? What do small private schools look for that large public universities are not interested in? During the workshop, we will discuss some general guidelines for creating your application materials. We will also have a panel of ?experts? from various schools to provide thoughts on tailoring your application materials to better meet the needs of that academic environment. Please bring a draft of your application materials with you to the workshop.

  • W45: Video Resource for Learning Assistant Development

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 29
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Renee Michelle Goertzen

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Rachel E. Scherr Seattle Pacific University

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 20

    The Video Resource for Learning Assistant Development is a package of thematic case-based "video workshops," designed to supplement the University of Colorado?s widely disseminated LA development program. In a video workshop, short, compelling video episodes are accompanied by captions, transcript, excerpts from instructional materials, and targeted discussion questions to help LAs and faculty explore the principles and values that inform instructor and student behavior. The video episodes showcase a variety of exemplary (yet real-life) LA-relevant instructional formats including Tutorials in Introductory Physics, Modeling Instruction, Investigative Science Learning Environment, and Open Source Tutorials. After a brief overview of the project, participants will spend most of their time actually participating in a sample video workshop: i.e., watching compelling classroom video of LAs and students interacting, and discussing the observations they make. Participants will be provided with full access to the package of video workshops. Bring a laptop if it's convenient.

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