National Meeting Program Schedule

2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Monday, August 01

 

Total Number of Records Found: 242

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AA:

PIRA: Outreach from the Ground Up
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Ramesh Sathappan,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AA01:

Outreach from Higher Ed to K-12: Collaboration and Engagement
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - Lisa L. Grable, NC State University
(919) 515-9403, grable@ncsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Lisa Grable
  Abstract: University departments in the STEM fields often work to develop partnerships and collaboration with K-12 school districts and other community partners. What are the issues with building a bridge from current research and practice in physics and other science and engineering to inquiry-based activities for the K-12 classroom? What are challenges to be addressed when working with teachers or students? How can one go from one-shot, feel-good demonstrations to sustained support and student achievement? What are the possible sources of funding for developing programs? How can university faculty and students be engaged in outreach work? Examples from The Science House at NC State University and other programs will be presented. See http://www.science-house.org/ for information and resources.
  Footnotes: -sponsored in part by NSF Award #0812121, Division of Engineering Education and Centers. -See http://www.science-house.org/ for information and resources.
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AA02:

Physics Phenomena as a Catalyst and Context for Cultivating Community and Camaraderie
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Erik A. Herman
Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator based Sciences and Education
520-400-0980, eah229@cornell.edu
  Co-Author(s): Lora K. Hine
  Abstract: Over the past year, Cornell's Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences and Education has been field-developing its science outreach mobile programming. An iterative process based on existing models, our expansion includes a theatrical kid-powered physics demonstration show, the use of informal venues for science experiences, and bringing science into family conversations with make-and-take exploration. Each component is driven by core motivations: illuminating the simple intrinsic beauty of physical phenomena, making physics familiar and accessible, and bringing people together in the context of science. Practical considerations include: the use of cheap and available resources, establishing a brand, building and maintaining a enthusiastic team of volunteers, and building a following. There are also challenges: how to teach without being didactic, how to provide problem-solving experiences that aren't frustrating, and how to measure success.
  Footnotes: None
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AA03:

Gravitational Waves from the Ground Up
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Kathy D. Holt, LIGO LLO Science Education Center
225-686-3193, kholt@ligo-la.caltech.edu
  Co-Author(s): Amber Stuver
  Abstract: The LIGO Lab in Livingston, LA, searches for gravitational waves or ripples in space-time caused by massive objects undergoing incredible accelerations -- such as colliding neutron stars. LIGO Science Education Center seeks to connect this active scientific research to the public through simple science activities and demonstrations. At LIGO-SEC students of all ages learn about gravity waves by developing their understanding of mechanical waves, sound waves, light waves, and general wave properties. Kathy Holt, LIGO Science Educator, will provide an overview of several low-cost demonstrations and activities that LIGO-SEC uses to explain wave properties and how an interferometer works. Demonstrations will bridge the gap from interference in a hanging wave machine to lissajous patterns from a membranophone. Material will be provided for participants to build at least one demonstration.
  Footnotes: None
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AA04:

Taking Physics to the Next Level: Physics in Multimedia
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:30AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Invited - Angella Johnson, University of Southern California
213-740-1149, angellaj@usc.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Opportunities are expanding for physicists and physics technicians to be involved in outreach efforts in the media. There is a growing interest amongst the general public to truly understand physics concepts and to see it presented in an interesting way. Improving the public's understanding of physics can lead to a greater appreciation for science. This will be illustrated with snippets from recent projects and other colleagues' involvement at USC.
  Footnotes: None
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AB:

Objectives and Assessment of the Physics Graduate Program
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Juan Burciaga,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AB01:

Changes and Challenges in Physics Graduate Programs
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:20AM
  Author: Invited - Michael Thoennessen, Michigan State University
517 908 7323, thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Many physics departments have made significant changes to their graduate programs in the last few years. These changes were partly driven by the increasing specialization of the field and the increasing number of interdisciplinary programs. Changes included modifications of the core curriculum and the comprehensive exams. Are these changes effective? Are the students better prepared for non-academic/industry careers? Are these changes improving the traditionally high drop-out rates? It is still too early to answer these questions, but the departments are encouraged to document and analyze the results of the implemented changes carefully so that the "best practices" can be implemented in other departments.
  Footnotes: None
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AB02:

Defining and Assessing Goals of a Graduate Physics Program
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:20AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Invited - Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh
41-262-49045, clsingh@pitt.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss and encourage participants to consider how success should be defined for a graduate physics program and how departments can assess it. A particular focus will be on the inclusion of underrepresented students in the physics graduate programs.
  Footnotes: None
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AB03:

The Challenge of Setting Objectives in Physics PhD Programs
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:40AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Thomas D. Cohen, University of Maryland
301-654-7702, cohen@physics.umd.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: It is particularly challenging in the context of physics PhD programs to construct objectives and schemes to systematically assess whether these objectives are met. This is for two reasons. The first is that these programs focus on research. It is probably true that there is broad agreement the purpose of these programs is to train students to become independent and highly competent researchers. The challenge is to articulate in a precise and measurable way precisely what skills and/or knowledge an independent and competent researcher needs to acquire. The second challenge is related to the great diversity of research subfields that exist in Physics PhD programs. Students who work on experimental "big science'' such as an LHC experiment need to learn a radically different set of skills than students working in say biophysics or computational plasma physics. Given the disparate needs of these subfields, it is particularly difficult to construct meaningful objectives that apply to all of these.
  Footnotes: Sponsor: Juan Burciaga
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AB04:

Graduate Education as Vocational School: Industrial and Entrepreneurial Physics
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:20PM
  Author: Invited - Robert W. Brown, Case Western Reserve University
216-368-4010, rwb@case.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Three decades of my industrial partnerships with more than 10 companies have led to significant publications, patents, start-ups, and jobs. My 20 graduated PhD students have upwards of 150 patents and 200 publications and abstracts, and have worked in remarkably diverse areas, from radiation, imaging, and heat transfer physics, to magnetic particle ferrofluids, and sensor development for contaminated industrial fluids. I am connected to three new manufacturing companies with more than 100 employees, 20% of whom have been trained in my computational laboratory. This is aligned with a national award-winning master's program in physics entrepreneurship, where I've been co-advisor for 25 graduates. As an outgrowth of a unique imaging course, my former students and I have co-authored a 900-page textbook referred to as the "daily companion of the MRI scientist." I discuss the relevance of all of this to general physics graduate education, especially in today's funding climate.
  Footnotes: None
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AC:

Physics Education Research Around the World I
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 9:40AM
  Presider: Genaro Zavala,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AC01:

Diagnosing Student Understanding of Data Analysis Techniques
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - Ross K. Galloway, University of Edinburgh
+44 (0)131 650 8614, ross.galloway@ed.ac.uk
  Co-Author(s): Simon P. Bates, Helen E Maynard-Casely, Katherine A Slaughter, Hilary Singer
  Abstract: Physicists acquire data from a multitude of sources, ranging from their own experimental equipment or numerical simulations to the outputs of large experimental collaborations. However, the mere acquisition of this data is not enough: it is essential to know how to analyse and interpret it once it has been gathered. We expect that physics degrees will equip our students with the necessary analysis skills, but do they? We have formulated a diagnostic test of data-handling skills, and have deployed it in a number of universities across the UK and Ireland. Our findings suggest that student abilities in data handling are not being strongly developed by typical laboratory instruction, and that explicit tuition of the required techniques is needed. Furthermore, we find that part of the problem may be that the graduate teaching assistants we rely on may themselves not possess fully developed skills in this area.
  Footnotes: None
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AC02:

Can Student Generated Content Enhance Engagement and Learning in Physics?
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Simon P. Bates, The University of Edinburgh
+44 (0)131 650 5280, s.p.bates@ed.ac.uk
  Co-Author(s): Ross K. Galloway, Karon McBride
  Abstract: We describe a pilot study undertaken in a first-year physics class at the University of Edinburgh, in which students were tasked with creating their own assessment content in the form of multiple- choice questions. Using the PeerWise online system, a regular homework assignment was substituted for one in which students were required to author at least one original question, answer five others contributed by their peers, and rate and comment on a further three. The question repository was not moderated during the assignment, with tutors merely observing. The talk will discuss the scaffolding we provided for students in order to help them create questions and illustrate examples of engagement with the task and the exceptionally high quality of questions and comments provided by the student community. We also present correlations of degree of engagement with the task with end-of-course assessment performance.
  Footnotes: None
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AC03:

Perceptions and Beliefs of Undergraduate Physics Majors toward Physics in Saudi Arabia
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Hisham A. Alhadlaq
The Excellence Research Center of Science and Mathematics Education, King Saud University
+96614676435, hhadlaq@ksu.edu.sa
  Co-Author(s): Katherine K. Perkins, Wendy K. Adams, Omar M. Al-Dossary
  Abstract: In the last decade, physics researchers around the world have studied student perceptions and beliefs on physics and learning physics. Several instruments have been used to measure these perceptions and to identify how close they are to perceptions of experts. Recently, we have administered a newly developed Arabic version of the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) to a sample of senior physics-major students at King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The survey was distributed to about 100 male and female students over a three-year period (2009-2011). We will present our findings of perceptions and beliefs of undergraduate physics majors about physics and learning physics at KSU. We will take a closer look at how their perceptions compare to those of experts. An analysis of how these perceptions compare to the perceptions of a sample of freshmen students will also be presented.
  Footnotes: None
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AC04:

The Effect of Formative Assessment in Brazilian University Physics Courses
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Emerson F. Cruz, Michigan State University
517-355-3122, efcruz@msu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Gerd Kortemeyer
  Abstract: Most post-secondary physics courses in Brazil offer no meaningful formative assessment opportunities. We implemented online homework with immediate feedback in two courses, one with traditional learners at a public university, and one with nontraditional learners at a private university. In addition, at the public university, clickers were used in lecture. While surveys showed broad acceptance of these techniques by the students and the belief that they helped in learning, grades did not significantly improve - instead, we observed a narrowing of the grade distribution toward mid-range grades at the public university, and no difference at the private university. Our study also identifies a number of logistical and organizational hurdles that need to be overcome before a hopefully more successful implementation of these techniques should be attempted.
  Footnotes: None
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AC05:

Mathematics in Cameroon: from Text to Talk in the Classroom
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Anne E. Emerson, University of California, Santa Barbara
6262156764, aemerson@education.ucsb.edu
  Co-Author(s): Danielle B. Harlow
  Abstract: Mathematics is a gateway for learning science and thus limits the number of students choosing physics as a discipline of study. In Cameroon, this limitation is exacerbated by the introduction of algebra and early math and science tracking in secondary school. Textbooks prescribe classroom practices and relationships between content, teachers, and students, especially in Cameroon where they have strong foundations in European pedagogy and are often the sole resource in the classroom (Fonkeng, 2007). In this study, we examined how a mathematics textbook served to mediate the structure and interactions for two classes at a secondary school in Yaoundé, Cameroon. This research provides insight into how a textbook informs algebra instruction in an effort to better understand its role in supporting or constraining access to the fields of math and science.
  Footnotes: Fonkeng, George Epah (2007). The history of education in Cameroon, 1844-2004. Lewiston, New York: The Edwin Mellen Press, Ltd.
Sponsored by Danielle B. Harlow
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AC06:

Contextual Elements in Translation of Force Concept Inventory into Japanese
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Michi Ishimoto, Kochi University of Technology
81-887-57-2510, ishimoto.michi@kochi-tech.ac.jp
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We create a new Japanese version of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) by combining three existing versions administered at three universities in Japan. The new version is for distribution to high schools and universities to assess students' preconceptions. The three existing versions are quite dissimilar because of differences in the interlingual translation stemming from large variation of expression in the translator's personal sense of language. We identify three elements of the interlingual translation that can alter the context of the questionnaire. The first element is the coining of scientific terms, such as velocity and acceleration, for school use so as to differentiate from everyday language. The second element is the use of gender expression, which is not necessary to describe in questionnaires in Japanese. The third element concerns lifestyle and cultural differences. For example, a car pushing a truck at cruising speed does not occur in Japan.
  Footnotes: None
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AD:

Reflections on the Gordon Conference on Experimental Research and Labs in Physics Education
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 9:30AM
  Presider: Kiko Galvez,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AD01:

Using Experiments to Foster Conceptual Understanding: Insights From PER*
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - MacKenzie R. Stetzer, University of Washington
206 543-6390, stetzer@phys.washington.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Physics Education Group at the University of Washington has been investigating student learning in an upper-division laboratory course in analog electronics. Our findings indicate a need for research-based instructional materials that are expressly designed to help deepen student understanding and to address specific difficulties identified through research. As we begin this curriculum-development effort, we plan to draw on our extensive experience designing research-based and research-validated materials for use in special laboratory-based, inquiry-oriented courses for K-12 teachers.1 In this talk, I will highlight the role of experiments in instructional strategies that have been shown to strengthen the conceptual understanding of K-12 teachers. I will also reflect on how such approaches may be implemented in upper-division laboratory courses.
  Footnotes: *This work has been supported in part by the NSF under Grant No. DUE-0618185. 1. Physics by Inquiry, L.C. McDermott and the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, Wiley (1996).
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AD02:

Dynamic Interferometric Measurements: Acoustical/Mechanical Resonators and Changing Magnetic Fields
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Richard Peterson, Bethel University
703-292-4629, petric@bethel.edu
  Co-Author(s): Keith Stein
  Abstract: Physical optics combines with computational physics to make three experimental project areas especially rich in experimental breadth (optics, electronics, acoustics, fluid dynamics, along with structural and magnetic properties of materials), in addition to facilitating year-to-year student/faculty creativity. Stroboscopic holography techniques with a high (130 - 160) dB gas resonator allow real-time imaging of sound patterns at resonance as gas density variations impact the index of refraction and produce quantifiable fringe motions at pressure antinodes. A steel tuning fork is rich in torsional and transverse modes that yield to spectral analysis and computational FFT work with COMSOL. Stroboscopic holography produces quantifiable video images of these modes that may be compared to spectral and COMSOL predictions. Rapidly changing magnetic fields in a material produce Faraday-effect induced interferometric phase shifts between circularly polarized beams, and real-time fringe readouts can measure rapidly changing fields at the level of a few gauss in TGG.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by the MN NASA Space Grant and the Carlsen-Lewis Endowment at Bethel University.
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AD03:

Quantum Mechanics with a Lab
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Enrique J. Galvez, Colgate University
(315)228-7205, egalvez@colgate.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: I report on an undergraduate course on quantum mechanics with a lab component. The lab consists of five experiments with correlated photons for students to learn applications of quantum mechanics. Optical components are represented by matrix operators. Hilbert spaces can be momentum modes (propagation along x or y directions), polarization modes (horizontal or vertical), or combinations of these for one or two photons, forming two or four-dimensional spaces. The experiments explore basic quantum mechanical operations such as basis projection, basis rotation, superposition and measurement. Experiments also touch modern themes such as the concepts of qubits and entanglement. We use two optical layouts, each set up on a 2' x 5' optical breadboard.
  Footnotes: None
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AD04:

Fundamental Instructional Labs in Quantum Mechanics for Undergraduate Physics Majors
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Gabriel C. Spalding, Illinois Wesleyan University
(309) 556-3004, gspaldin@iwu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Many students have a difficult time grasping quantum mechanical models and, particularly given that the most popular undergraduate text on quantum (Griffiths) forgoes references to real experiments, a new generation of instructional experiments is deemed to provide the absolutely critical visualization and tangible proof that are needed to convince students of key elements of quantum theory. Such instructional labs have been featured highlights of the 2009 Advanced Lab Topical Conference in Ann Arbor and of the 2010 Gordon Conference on Physics Research and Education, and have also been incorporated into the ALPhA Immersion Program, which provides hands-on training for lab instructors (e.g., in demonstrating the existence of photons, single-photon interference, indistinguishability and the quantum eraser, entanglement and tests of Bell's inequalities, etc.). This led us to establish a group focused on furthering efforts to make these sorts of labs more affordable.
  Footnotes: None
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AD05:

What Is the Relevance of Physics Education Research to the Advanced Lab?
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Benjamin M. Zwickl, University of Colorado at Boulder
3034921446 , benjamin.zwickl@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Noah D. Finkelstein, Heather J Lewandowski
  Abstract: The University of Colorado Boulder is in the early stages of a 2.5-year research-based redesign of our upper-division physics lab courses. There has been a nationwide resurgence of interest in advanced physics labs among instructors and faculty, but the PER community to date has focused on introductory and lecture-format classes. Little research has been conducted on these uniquely sophisticated and resource-rich learning environments in terms of goals, measurements of learning, and outcomes of modification. We are applying the existing research-base and methods of PER as a tool to make our labs better with the dual purpose of finding generalizable lessons about effective instruction in advanced lab courses. We will report preliminary outcomes that include our process of modification, learning goals, assessment frameworks, and a revised lab example.
  Footnotes: None
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AE:

PER: Investigating Classroom Strategies I
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Tom Carter,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AE01:

Understanding the Variable Effect of Course Innovations on Student Learning
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:10AM
  Author: Heidi Iverson, University of Colorado Boulder
303-492-4331, heidi.iverson@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Over the last several decades, research has challenged the efficacy of the traditional lecture-based instructional model of undergraduate physics education. As a result, a large number of reform-oriented instructional innovations have been developed, enacted, and studied in undergraduate physics courses. While previous work has shown that the impact of course innovations on student learning has been overwhelmingly positive, it has also been highly variable. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate this variability. For this analysis 170 published studies on undergraduate physics course innovations were coded with respect to the characteristics of the innovations as well as the methodological characteristics of the study designs. The findings of this analysis have indicated that nearly half of the variability can be accounted for by study design characteristics rather than by characteristics of the innovations used. However, a subsequent analysis has highlighted some of the critical characteristics of more effective innovations.
  Footnotes: None
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AE02:

Teaching Creativity and Innovation to Physicists Using Tablet PCs
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:10AM - 8:20AM
  Author: Patrick B. Kohl, Colorado School of Mines
303-384-2303, pkohl@mines.edu
  Co-Author(s): Vincent H. Kuo, Frank Kowalski, Susan Kowalksi
  Abstract: As the rest of the world catches up to the U.S. in industrial output and technological sophistication, our continued economic prosperity will depend on strengthening our historical success in generating new ideas. While there are limited efforts to foster creativity and innovation through formal and informal instruction in the business world, few efforts exist in science or engineering education. To address this, the Colorado School of Mines has recently created a dedicated Tablet PC classroom where we hold an elective physics course for the purpose of improving creativity in our students. In this talk, we report on the structure of the course and the technologies used. The latter include pedagogical implementations of InkSurvey, a free web-based software package that enables detailed, real-time interactions with the instructor. We assess student progress via the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, and discuss early work towards developing a physics-specific instrument for measuring creativity.
  Footnotes: None
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AE03:

Clickers 2.0: Managing Classroom Interactions
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:20AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Brian Lukoff, Harvard University
617-495-9616, blukoff@seas.harvard.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Mazur
  Abstract: Clickers are widely used for formative assessment in physics classrooms, but current clicker systems have numerous limitations. In particular, most clicker systems have limited question formats beyond multiple-choice, and provide only limited ways for instructors to use data to improve instruction. We will introduce a new web-based system we have developed that allows students to use laptops and smartphones to answer many different kinds of questions (e.g., indicating the direction of a vector, or entering an algebraic expression) and allows instructors to use the data in real time to automatically group students for peer instruction based on their responses and their reported geographical locations in the classroom. Based on an initial deployment of this system in an introductory electricity and magnetism course, we will show some examples of what can be learned about student understanding from non-multiple-choice items and what can be learned about peer instruction from automatic grouping.
  Footnotes: None
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AE04:

Assessing Course-Integrated Problem Comparisons Activities Using Similarity Ratings Surveys
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Frances A. Mateycik, Penn State Altoona
8149495177, fam13@psu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Kendra E. Sheaffer
  Abstract: Students in an algebra-based physics course were required to complete a compare and contrast activity each week. The treatment was used to examine whether direct problem comparisons are useful for facilitating student awareness of physical, deep-structure problem characteristics. Students were expected to write detailed arguments as to how two problems of their own selection from the weekly homework assignment were similar and different from one another. Handwritten feedback was offered after each assignment, and students were deducted points if their responses were considered too vague. Pre- and post-treatment similarity ratings surveys were used to evaluate the emphasis students placed on deep-structure. The survey required students to rate the similarities between eight pairs of problems of varying similarity, and write a description that supported their numerical rating. This talk will summarize student survey responses before and after treatment, and compare any trends with previous semesters where no immediate feedback was offered.
  Footnotes: None
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AE05:

Adapting PER Strategies for Middle School Science Classes
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: David E. Meltzer, Arizona State University
480-727-5215, david.meltzer@asu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: There is great potential in adapting, for the middle-school classroom, instructional strategies and curricular materials developed and validated for use with college students. Substantial modifications in content, format, and instructional design are needed and must conform to a variety of constraints such as time availability for instruction and grading, equipment and administrative resources, etc. I will describe my experiences in adapting PER-based materials and methods for weekly science classes taught to grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 during the 2010-2011 academic year. The context was a one-hour class taught each week to five different classes, all in the setting of a university instructional laboratory.
  Footnotes: Supported by a grant from Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College
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AE06:

Examining Correlations Between Lecture Conceptual Question Responses and Course Performance
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Jeffrey T. Morgan, University of Northern Iowa
319-273-2290, jeff.morgan@uni.edu
  Co-Author(s): Cynthia Wakefield
  Abstract: We have implemented peer instruction in an introductory level conceptual physics course for non-science majors, based on the success that others report with this method.(1) We expected to see that learning from peer conversation, as evidenced by answering conceptual questions correctly following discussion, would correlate with course grade, but did not observe any link. We did, however, note moderate correlation between answering a conceptual question correctly prior to peer conversation and course grade, indicating that while peer conversation improves the interactivity of a lecture course, interaction may be more important than arriving at the correct answer to student success.
  Footnotes: 1. Crouch, C. H. and E. Mazur, "Peer Instruction: Ten years of experience and results." American Journal of Physics 69 (9), 970-977.
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AE07:

Scaffolding Students' Development of Mental Models for Pulleys Systems
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Amy Rouinfar, Kansas State University
785-532-1612, rouinfar@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Adrian M. Madsen, Tram Do Ngoc Hoang, N. Sanjay Rebello, Sadhana Puntambekar
  Abstract: Research has shown that students have several misconceptions about pulleys. To construct a mental model of how pulley systems work, students must elicit and confront these misconceptions. We report on a study with students in a conceptual physics laboratory investigating pulley systems using physical or virtual manipulatives. Written materials guided students through a sequence of activities designed to scaffold their model construction process. The activity sequences facilitated students' sense making by requiring them to make predictions about different pulley systems and testing these predictions by building and comparing different systems. At the end of each of the two weeks of the activity, students were given the task of designing the best pulley system for lifting a piano. We investigate the ways in which students use the manipulatives while navigating scaffolding activities and how the students' mental model development of pulley systems compares between the physical and virtual treatments.
  Footnotes: This work is supported in part by U.S. Dept. of Education IES grant award R305A080507.
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AE08:

Peer Instruction Self-Efficacy
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Julie A. Schell, Harvard University
917-319-9741, schell@seas.harvard.edu
  Co-Author(s): Brian Lukoff, Jason Dowd, Laura Tucker, Eric Mazur
  Abstract: Physics education research suggests that students' beliefs in their ability to complete physics tasks successfully--that is, their physics self-efficacy--may play an important role in explaining their learning and success in undergraduate physics classrooms (Fencl & Scheel, 2005; Kost, Pollock, Finkelstein 2005). Following this line of research, we introduce a new self-efficacy construct, Peer Instruction Self-Efficacy (PISE), which describes students' beliefs in their abilities to engage in specific Peer Instruction activities. For example, PISE includes physics students' beliefs that they can successfully convince their neighbors of the validity of their responses to conceptually based questions during Peer Instruction. In this talk, we will introduce our instrument for measuring PISE, as well as data on how students' PISE changes over the course of one semester of an introductory undergraduate electricity and magnetism course at one major research university. We will also report initial findings about the relationship between students' PISE and their eventual learning outcomes in the course.
  Footnotes: H. Fencl & K. Scheel, J. Col. Sci. Teach. 35, 20 (2005). L. E. Kost, S. J. Pollock, N.D. Finkelstein. Physics Education Research Conference, (2009).
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AE09:

Is this Good Teaching? Assessment Challenges for Both Faculty and Institutions
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Chandra A. Turpen, Western Michigan University
303.817.0250, Chandra.Turpen@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Charles Henderson, Melissa Dancy
  Abstract: As part of a larger research study, we focus on the investigation of barriers to instructional change. One significant barrier that has emerged is that neither faculty nor their institutions know how to evaluate student learning (or teaching effectiveness) in introductory physics courses. In this talk, we will present results from telephone interviews with 70 physics faculty related to how faculty and their institutions evaluate teaching effectiveness. We will focus on the following research questions: 1) What information is gathered about instructors? teaching and students? learning? 2) How is this information used? 3) How are different sources of information perceived or valued by faculty? Helping faculty (and possibly institutions) make judgments about whether their instruction is working may be an integral part of supporting efforts to improve undergraduate physics instruction.
  Footnotes: Supported, in part, by NSF Award No. 0715698
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AE10:

Teaching Assistant Impact on Student Understanding of Electrostatic Concepts
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Keith West, Texas Tech University
806-742-3971, keith.h.west@ttu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Beth Thacker
  Abstract: Teaching assistants were given a ranking problem in electrostatics to teach during recitation sections. The same problem was given on an in-class exam two weeks later. Student performance on the exam question is examined as a function of TA teaching style, which is ranked using the RTOP assessment.
  Footnotes: This project is supported by the NIH grant 5RC1GM090897-02. Sponsored by Beth Thacker.
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AE11:

Comparison of an Inquiry-based Algebra-based Course to Traditional Teaching
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Mahmoud Yaqoub, Texas Tech University
806-742-3972, m.yaqoub@ttu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Beth Thacker, Keith West, Mark Ellermann, Jake Schwierking
  Abstract: We present data comparing an inquiry-based, algebra-based introductory physics course to courses taught traditionally and by interactive engagement. The inquiry-based course was taught in a hands-on, laboratory-based classroom. It was taught without a text, using materials developed explicitly for the algebra-based population, supported by two NSF grants.(1) We present data both from conceptual inventories and written pre- and post-tests administered to all of the classes.
  Footnotes: (1)arXiv:physics/0702247v1 supported by CCLI #9981031 and CCLI-EMD #0088780. This project is supported by the NIH grant 5RC1GM090897-02. Sponsored by Beth Thacker.
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AE12:

High-School Teachers' Implementation of 'Troubleshooting-Tasks' Presented in an In-Service Program
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:50AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Edit Yerushalmi, Weizmann Institute of Science
97289343743, edit.yerushalmi@weizmann.ac.il
  Co-Author(s): Sawsan Ailabouni, Rafi Safadi
  Abstract: "Troubleshooting Tasks" require students to detect an error in a statement describing a situation, explain it, and correct it. Such tasks can serve as a context for refining interpretations of scientific concepts if designed appropriately. In particular, statements should include mistaken reasoning reflecting alternative conceptions known from the research literature, and feedback should highlight how a mistaken interpretation differs from the scientific one. "Troubleshooting Tasks" were presented in an in-service program for high school teachers from the Arab sector in Israel. We report how these tasks were implemented in the classrooms. Data sources consist of statements and sample solutions composed by the teachers, teachers' assessment of students' performance, and their reflections regarding their experience. In particular, we answer: To what extent did actual implementation confirm with the aforementioned guidelines? What challenges did teachers face when implementing these tasks? The results can inform the design of in-service programs presenting teachers with similar tasks.
  Footnotes: Edit Yerushalmi
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AF:

Learning Progressions
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 9:00AM
  Presider: Vivian O'Brien,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AF01:

Linking Research with Practice: How Learning Progressions Guide Instructional Decisions
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - Karin Hess
National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment
802-899-5238, Khess@nciea.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This session will address the question: What are learning progressions (LPs) and how can they be used in the classroom to determine the "next steps" for instruction? Several hands-on activities will illustrate how classroom teachers can use science LPs to: (1) evaluate the scope of current assessments across the year; (2) plan curriculum sequences using research-based learning continua; and (3) use ongoing assessment data to monitor student progress. Examples of how teachers in several states are designing assessments to determine where students are along the continuum of learning using LPS will be shared.
  Footnotes: None
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AG:

Methods to Improve Conceptual Learning in Quantum Mechanics I
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 9:30AM
  Presider: Mario Belloni,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AG01:

Teaching Quantum Mechanics in the Paradigms in Physics Curriculum
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - David H. McIntyre, Oregon State University
541 737-1696, mcintyre@ucs.orst.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: To improve conceptual learning, the Paradigms in Physics program has reordered material from the subdisciplines and incorporated modern pedagogical strategies. In the quantum part of our curriculum, we adopt a "spins-first" approach by introducing quantum mechanics through the analysis of sequential Stern-Gerlach spin measurements. The aims of the spins-first approach are: (1) To immerse students in the inherently quantum mechanical aspects of physics, and (2) To give students experience with the mechanics of quantum mechanics in the forms of Dirac and matrix notation. To facilitate our spins-first approach, we use Stern-Gerlach simulation software to study measurements, interferometers, spin precession in a magnetic field, and "which-path" detection. We build upon the spins-first approach by using the spin-1/2 example to introduce perturbation theory, the addition of angular momentum, and identical particles. We use Dirac notation and matrix notation throughout our five quantum courses, emphasizing the importance of fluency in multiple representations.
  Footnotes: This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. 9653250, 0231194, and 0618877. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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AG02:

Ask, and It Shall be Given You
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Daniel F. Styer,
440-775-8183, Dan.Styer@oberlin.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Conceptual learning in a quantum mechanics course can be promoted by a balanced, interwoven treatment of concepts, formalism, and applications so that each thread reinforces the other. In particular, it is important that most problems, no matter how technical, contain conceptual elements as well.
  Footnotes: None
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AG03:

Turning Quantum Mechanics Course Notes into Tutorials
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Todd K. Timberlake, Berry College
(706) 368-5622, ttimberlake@berry.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Efforts have been under way for many years to introduce active engagement strategies in the teaching of introductory physics. More recently there have been attempts to expand the use of active engagement into upper-division physics courses. In this talk I will discuss my efforts to employ active engagement in an upper-level quantum mechanics course, using a series of tutorial activities covering many of the standard topics in quantum mechanics. I will discuss some of the challenges of using active engagement to teach quantum mechanics, as well as my process for creating the tutorials, most of which were simply adapted from the derivations and sample problems that I had previously presented in lecture format. In addition, I will comment on the overall success of this approach, mention some topics for which I still make use of traditional lecture, and share the reactions of my students to the tutorials and the class as a whole. The tutorials (in pdf and LaTeX format) can be found at http://facultyweb.berr.edu/ttimberlake/active_quantum/.
  Footnotes: None
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AH:

Best Practices in the Use of Educational Technologies I
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:40AM
  Presider: Andrew Garvin,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AH01:

Minds-On Audio-Guided Activities in Introductory College Physics Courses
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: James Brian Hancock, II, Central Michigan University
989-714-5331, hanco1jb@cmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Marco Fornari
  Abstract: Minds-On Audio Guided Activities (MAGA) are Podcast-delivered instruction designed to engage students in all-body experiments and foster long-term conceptual learning. These Podcasts guide students through experimentation, prompt group discussion, and lead students toward connecting daily experiences with the activity. Instruction by MAGA has undergone preliminary testing in an introductory physics course at Central Michigan University. The experiment is designed according to the standard protocol of learning assessment and involves pre- and post-tests and student interviews. Topics are currently focused on mechanics and range from discovering the differences between distance and displacement to momentum to the Coriolis effect. The session will include details of the approach and a discussion of preliminary results.
  Footnotes: None
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AH02:

The Monty Hall Problem Using Clickers
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: Stephen H. Irons, Yale University
203-432-3664, stephen.irons@yale.edu
  Co-Author(s): C. Meg Urry
  Abstract: In the lecture setting, clickers make the collection of student-generated input quick and easy. Though traditionally employed in conjunction with conceptual questions and peer instruction, clickers can also be used to perform statistical experiments in real time. We describe an activity that combines clickers and a simple paper prop to conduct rapid and multiple statistical experiments. The eponymously named Monty Hall problem is an excellent exercise in conditional probability for students as it has a counterintuitive solution, but the actual outcomes can be dramatically demonstrated. Here we describe the problem and its solution and then discuss the results of an in-class implementation conducted during a lecture on probability. In addition to expanding the activity to include variations on the initial problem statement, instructors can also model radioactive decay using students, clickers, and a random number generator.
  Footnotes: None
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AH03:

Tweetment of Twitter in the Classroom
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: John T. Miller, Thornapple Kellogg High School
617-970-0044, johnthomasmiller@hotmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: How do I better connect with and appropriately communicate with my students? Twitter should be considered as part of the solution. This presentation is about unleashing the power of Twitter to better educate, inform, and connect your students to your classroom and curriculum. This talk will be focused on how Twitter is being used in a high school setting and strategies to make it successful. Educators of all levels will find this talk informative.
  Footnotes: www.tinyurl.com/tweetment
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AH04:

Using Simulations to Help Prepare Students for the Lab
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Mark J. Paetkau, Thompson Rivers University
250 828 5453, mpaetkau@tru.ca
  Co-Author(s): Dan Bissonnette, Colin Taylor
  Abstract: For the past few years we have been using online simulations to help students prepare for their Introductory Physics labs. We have written online animations allowing students to simulate the lab before arriving, which, ideally, more effectively prepares students for the lab. To test whether the simulations are more effective than traditional pen-and-paper questions as pre-lab exercises, we attempted to measure the "level-of-preparedness" of our students. Using our preparedness measure, we compare the preparedness for the two forms of pre-lab exercises. A statistically significant change in "preparedness" is found with the use of online simulations over the pen-and-paper pre-labs.
  Footnotes: None
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AH05:

Using Web-based Multimedia Prelectures in Introductory Physics
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Homeyra R. Sadaghiani, Cal Poly Pomona
(909)869-5194, hrsadaghiani@csupomona.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: For the last two years, I have been using Multimedia Learning Modules (MLM)* developed by University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne as online Pre-lecture assignments in introductory physics courses at Cal Poly Pomona. By exposing students to the key ideas of lecture prior to class, MLMs allow instructors to focus on more in-depth application of the physics concepts during class. I will discuss the impact MLMs had on student preparation for class discussion and exam performance.
  Footnotes: * https://online-s.physics.uiuc.edu/courses/phys211/gtm/No_Login/page.html
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AH06:

Math Machines: Connecting Physics with Math and Engineering
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Fred Thomas, Sinclair Community College
937-832-0792, fred.thomas@mathmachines.net
  Co-Author(s): Robert Chaney
  Abstract: Math Machines is a unique technology that establishes explicit links to mathematics and engineering within physics labs and student-focused classrooms. Students design and test free-form mathematical functions to control engineering-style physical systems and complete immediate, physical and dynamic tasks. Examples include programming a light to follow an accelerating object, programming an astronomical clock to replicate the motions of the Moon, programming motions of a platform to simulate earthquakes of arbitrary magnitude, and programming red, green, and blue lights to display oscillating colors in various combinations. Equipment is inexpensive, consisting primarily of such things as a hobby servo motor and a 3-color LED in combination with a SensoDAQ or NI myDAQ computer interface. Schools are encouraged to build similar equipment and share it with math, science, engineering and technology teachers in their region.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NSF?s Advanced Technological Education Program through grant DUE-1003381. More information is available at www.mathmachines.net.
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AH07:

Teaching with a TabletPC in Introductory Physics
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Krista E. Wood, University of Cincinnati
513-745-5745, Krista.Wood@uc.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Students in introductory physics often need significant support to develop the thought processes to be successful in physics. A TabletPC, similar to a SMART Board, can be used to create screencasts (videos) of worked out problems or even complete problem-solving sessions. If the instructor records the audio with the writing, students can watch the videos or replay parts they don't understand. The TabletPC can also be used to record Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD) results using the screen capture function or screencasts of complete video analysis demonstrations. Since ILDs particularly focus on helping students develop concepts, these videos are effective reinforcements for what occurs during the ILD in class.
  Footnotes: None
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AI:

Potpourri of Teacher Preparation Programs I
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Taha Mzoughi,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AI01:

A Teacher Preparation Model that Cultivates Student Success and Diversity
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - Laird Kramer, Florida International University
305 3486073, Laird.Kramer@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We present the rationale and results driving Florida International University's (FIU's) new physics teacher preparation program, a program designed to cultivate success for all students. FIU implemented yhe University of Colorado's Learning Assistant (LA) model in 2008 through a PhysTEC Grant. The LA model is an experiential teaching program for undergraduates that recruits and prepares future teachers while driving departmental reform, as LAs must experience research-validated curricula in order to make informed decisions about their future in teaching. The program now supports 45 LAs, impacts over 2,000 introductory physics students per year, and is now fully sustained by department funding. The LA program's success has prompted a spread to chemistry, earth science, mathematics, and biology. The impact is most compelling as FIU is a minority-serving urban public research institution in Miami, serving over 42,000 students, of which 64% are Hispanic, 13% are black, and 56% are women.
  Footnotes: Work supported by PhysTEC and NSF PHY-0802184.
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AI02:

100 Physics Teachers 7 Years, How Does BYU Do It?
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Duane B. Merrell, Brigham Young University
801-422-2255, duane_merrell@byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Brigham Young University restructured the physics teaching program in 2004. Since that time, this year we will reach our 100th physics-certified teacher. The highlights and heartaches of this program will be discussed. The efforts of the College of Math and Physical Science to bring the Physics Teaching Program back to the Department of Physics and the support this came with from the College of Education will be discussed. The working relationships between the two colleges and the local school districts will be shared. How we fund a teacher in residence and the value of the mentor teacher network to develop our students as teachers will be highlighted as one of the strengths of the program. We will also share the efforts that are made with mentoring and induction of new physics teachers as part of this talk.
  Footnotes: None
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AI03:

Physics Teacher Preparation at Buffalo State College
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Luanna Gomez, Buffalo State College
716-878-5639, gomezls@buffalostate.edu
  Co-Author(s): Daniel MacIsaac, David Henry, David Abbott, Lowell Sylwester
  Abstract: The physics department at Buffalo State College offers both a BS and MS Ed. degree that lead to New York State certificate for teaching high school physics. There are two MS Ed. degree programs. One is designed for currently certified professional teachers who wish to add physics as a second certification area, and the other is designed for career changing science and engineering professionals who wish to become New York state physics teachers through a two-year alternative certification process. We will discuss the rationale behind the programs and describe the course offerings.
  Footnotes: Submitted abstract and speacker in place of Dan L. MacIsaac.
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AI04:

Cogenerative Teaching in a Physics and Everyday Thinking Course
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Natan Samuels, Florida International University
305-348-3507, nsamu002@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Seth Manthey, Eric Brewe
  Abstract: We present the results of a cogenerative teaching experience in an elementary science content and methods course. This course implemented the Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET) curriculum, which we adapted to meet student and programmatic needs. In this talk we will discuss the cogenerative mediation process for learning environments (CMPLE) by which those adaptations occurred. Implementing CMPLE helped us to identify the needed course changes and effective teaching practices for this student population. Having done so was worthwhile, and provided us with a valued experience.
  Footnotes: None
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AI05:

Developing a Biology Extension within Physics and Everyday Thinking
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Seth R. Manthey, Florida International University
3053483507, smant005@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Natan Samuels, Eric Brewe
  Abstract: We present the results of a cogenerative teaching experience in an elementary science content and methods course. This course implemented the Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET) curriculum, which we adapted to meet student and programmatic needs. In this talk we will be discussing a specific adaptation we made to the PET curriculum. This change was achieved by uncovering the students' needs using the Cogenerative Mediation Process for Learning Environments (CMPLE) and then creating an extension from the infrared portion of the PET curriculum. This extension connected PET and physics in general to biological concepts. This extension was a result of cogenerative discussion regarding the needs of the students.
  Footnotes: None
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AI06:

Interface Physics Education with Science Education
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:50AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Celia C. Chow, CSU
860.888.8209, cchungchow@comcast.net
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Physics education is an essential part of science education. Physical and biological sciences should be introduced to young students as early as possible in elementary schools and kindergardens. Then physical science will be divided into physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, etc. in senior high schools. Later, at the college/university level, they are sharply divided as different fields and highly specialized to particular topics. For high school teachers-to-be, it is challenging to teach with some areas combined at high school level due to the sharp specialization at college studies. How do we help new teachers apply physics laws to chemical, geological, and biological processes. And above all, how to apply physics laws to environmental issues. This task is for both teachers, high school and college levels.
  Footnotes: None
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BA:

Don't Put That Phone Away: Personal Electronics in the Classroom
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:30PM
  Presider: Steve Perroni,
  Co-Presiders(s): Nina Daye
  Equipment: N/A
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BA01:

Physics apps for the iPhone, the Touch, and the iPad
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Andrew Duffy, Department of Physics, Boston University
508 5234135, aduffy@bu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk will discuss physics apps for the iPhone, the iPod Touch, and the iPad. You can create your own apps and make them available through the App Store, and we will address that process briefly. However, there are a significant number of physics-related apps already available through the App Store, and we will talk about some of these and about ways in which you can use them in your own classes. Finally, some lucky attendees will receive a code so they can download a physics app for free.
  Footnotes: A link to some app information: http://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/iPhone/
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BA02:

VCalc: An iPhone app for Intro Physics Courses
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Steve J. Spicklemire, University of Indianapolis
(317) 847-3548, spicklemire@uindy.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: VCalc is an RPN vector calculator for the iPhone/iPod designed to help in performing various vector-intensive computations on a portable device. VCalc was created out of a need to perform vector calcuations like those required in intro physics courses, particularly the great "Matter and Interactions" curriculum developed by Ruth Chabay and Bruce Sherwood. This talk is a "behind the scenes" view of the development of an iPhone application intended for student use and the likely potentialities and limitations of such an approach. Alternative approaches and related apps are also discussed.
  Footnotes: URL for VCalc: http://www.spvi.net/VCalc_Support
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BA03:

Student Choices: Podcast or Text Preferences of Elementary Science Methods Students
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Invited - Cathy M. Ezrailson, University of South Dakota
281-773-5458, cathy.ezrailson@usd.edu
  Co-Author(s): Shane Miner
  Abstract: As part of an ongoing study with digital methods of content delivery, students in an Elementary Science Methods course were given the choice of content type: Podcast and/or text while studying assessment models. Student choice of and comfort level with digital media were examined. Student choice yielded some surprising results and interesting feedback.
  Footnotes: None
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BB:

Best Practices in the Use of Educational Technologies II
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 3:00PM
  Presider: Andrew Garvin,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BB01:

Teaching with Clickers: How, for What, and with What Mind-Set?
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Ian D. Beatty, University of North Carolina Greensboro
336.256.8600, idbeatty@uncg.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Clickers are a powerful tool for classroom instruction, but like any tool, they may be used skillfully or clumsily, for more or less fruitful purposes. What purposes are fruitful? Why do some teachers give up, some muddle along, some succeed, and some entirely transform their teaching? Based on personal teaching experiences, mentoring of others, and several years of research with teachers learning to use clickers, we offer some hard-won answers to these questions. Clicker use is best aimed at supporting question-driven instruction, dialogical discourse, formative assessment, and meta-level communication in the classroom. How teachers *frame* classroom activity -- their deeper attitudes, models, and professional thought habits -- is the most important factor determining their results. Explicit, concrete yet flexible "question design patterns" for creating clicker questions and "pedagogical patterns" for using them in class help teachers avoid common traps, get unstuck from ruts, and take full advantage of clickers' potential.
  Footnotes: See http://ianbeatty.com/aapt-2011s for slides and additional materials.
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BB02:

EJS and Open Source Physics: Teaching with Interactive Materials Across the Curriculum
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Mario Belloni, Davidson College
704-894-2320, mabelloni@davidson.edu
  Co-Author(s): Wolfgang Christian, Anne J. Cox, Todd Timberlake
  Abstract: Over the past dozen years Davidson College has produced some of the most widely used interactive curricular materials for the teaching of introductory and advanced physics courses. These materials are based on Open Source Physics (OSP) programs and applications, such as Easy Java Simulations (EJS). This talk will focus on three distinct areas of using simulations: teaching introductory physics and astronomy courses using EJS-based materials, modeling in intermediate classical mechanics with EJS, and teaching computational physics using EJS to develop Java simulations.
  Footnotes: None
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BB03:

Technology Use in the Laboratory -- One TYC Instructors' Perspective
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Invited - Todd R. Leif, Cloud County Community College
785 243-1435 x 216, tleif@cloud.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: It's really hard to believe but, I've never taught a physics lab without using some sort of computer interfacing equipment. As a 25-year veteran teacher, doing labs with Vernier data-collection technology has been a career-long process. In my small college setting, I can have students do very traditional problem solving labs, PER-Activity Based Labs or I can even have them create their own student designed and driven experiment. Computer Interfaced Lab Equipment has enhanced and supplemented my lab activities for the past 25 years. This talk will discuss the origins, the changes, the advancements and what I now consider the best practices for using computer technology in the introductory physics laboratory.
  Footnotes: None
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BB04:

The Assessment Continuum -- Before, in, and After Lecture
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:30PM - 3:00PM
  Author: Invited - Gerd Kortemeyer, Michigan State University
517-282-6446, korte@lite.msu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk will discuss strategies for formative and summative assessment using LON-CAPA (http://www.lon-capa.org/). It will cover the implementation of pre-lecture questions that are embedded in the online reading materials (including Just-In-Time teaching strategies), LON-CAPA-graded clicker questions during lecture (using i>clicker and i>clicker2), online homework problems after lecture, practice exams, and exams as summative assessment (including online retakes for partial credit). For each of these elements of the assessment cycle, experiences, proven implementation mechanisms, and research results, gathered over the last 10 years, will be shared.
  Footnotes: None
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BC:

PER: Problem Solving I
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:30PM
  Presider: Paul Nienaber,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BC01:

Tutorials to Facilitate Physics Problem Solving with Differentiation and Integration
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:10PM
  Author: Dehui Hu, Kansas State University
785-532-1612, dehuihu@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Joshua Von Korff, N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: Students in introductory-level physics encounter several difficulties when solving physics problems involving differentiation and integration. Physics instructors tend to assume that students have the prerequisite mathematical skills for success in the course, however, research has shown that most students do not know how to apply mathematical tools in a physics context. Based on the knowledge of the difficulties students with the use of differentiation and integration in physics encoutered from previous studies, we are developing instructional materials aimed at facilitating students to address these difficulties in several topics in introductory physics. We have implemented these materials in group problem-solving sessions aimed at enabling students to learn the mathematical concepts of tangent lines, slope, Riemann sum, and approximation in a physics context. We present a discussion about student difficulties on those concepts and the development of our instructional materials.
  Footnotes: This work is supported in part by U.S. National Science Foundation grant 0816207.
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BC02:

The Influence of Hints and Training on Student Resource Selection
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:10PM - 1:20PM
  Author: Joshua S. Von Korff, Kansas State University
785-532-1612, vonkorff@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Dehui Hu, N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: We consider physics problems that require students to combine their existing resources in new ways. When students do this in the context of integration and differentiation, they have many procedures, concepts, and representations to choose from. In addition, they may have varying degrees of understanding about the procedures they invent. We examine students' resource selection in problem solving situations, using an online environment to control and monitor their progress through a series of hints. Over the course of a 30-minute testing period, students work through a single problem; initially inventing their own strategies, then following our suggestions toward particular solutions. We will present results from our assessment of students' naïve understanding, as well as the impact of cues and training after a 50-minute practice session prior to the test. We will also describe students' ability to learn new ways of thinking about the problem.
  Footnotes: This work is supported in part by U.S. National Science Foundation grant 0816207.
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BC03:

Do Prescribed Prompts Prime Sensemaking During Group Problem Solving? Part One
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:20PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Mathew A. Martinuk, University of British Columbia
7788366366, martinuk@physics.ubc.ca
  Co-Author(s): Joss Ives
  Abstract: Many researchers and textbooks have promoted the use of rigid prescribed strategies for encouraging development of expert-like problem-solving behavior in novice students. The UBC Physics 100 course has been using context-rich problems with a prescribed five-step strategy since 2007. We have been analyzing audio recordings of students during group problem-solving sessions to analyze students' epistemological framing based on the implicit goal of their discussions. By treating the goal of "understanding the physics situation" as "sensemaking," we analyze the effectiveness of structured prompts intended to promote a shift to a sensemaking discussion. This talk will describe the setting and research methods, and a subsequent talk will discuss the analysis and results.
  Footnotes: None
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BC04:

Investigating Sequencing Effect on Biomedical Physics Problem Solving
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 1:40PM
  Author: Bijaya Aryal, University of Minnesota-Rochester
5072588216, baryal@umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): Robert L. Dunbar
  Abstract: This study focused on the effect of varying the sequence of problem solving and laboratory activities on the students' ability to solve subsequent biomedical contextual physics problems. A series of laboratory and problem solving activities were designed using concrete physical situations. Following the introduction of specific physics concepts, students worked in groups to complete related laboratories and problem solving activities. The order of problem solving and laboratory activities was regularly altered throughout the semester. Subsequently, the students were asked to solve related contextual biomedical physics problems. The result of the study indicated that altering the sequence of activities had a measurable impact on students' contextual problem solving performance and strategies.
  Footnotes: None
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BC05:

How to Improve Transfer from Difficult Worked Examples by Designing a 'Good Looking' Animated Solution
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:40PM - 1:50PM
  Author: Zhongzhou Chen
The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
217-721-8411, zchen22@illinois.edu
  Co-Author(s): Gary Gladding
  Abstract: It is well known that transfer from worked examples to new problems can be very hard for students. The goal of this research is to promote transfer by improving the quality of the example solution. According to our experience, elaborate verbal explanation often seems to have little, if not negative, effects on transfer. Therefore, we focus on designing a better visual representation. Based on knowledge from grounded cognition research, we designed several animated multimedia solutions for some difficult physics problems, in which the underlying logic is illustrated through visual perception. When compared to two other very similar versions of animated solutions that lack the critical perceptual elements, the designed solutions significantly improved transfer of the underlying physics principles to harder problems. Moreover, transfer is improved even when the target problem involves largely abstract logical reasoning, and little visual-spatial reasoning.
  Footnotes: None
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BC06:

The Impact of Sample Size in Using IRT with FCI
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:50PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Li Chen
School of Electronic science and engeering, Southeast University
614-292-2450, chenli.seu@163.com
  Co-Author(s): Jing Han, Liangyu Peng, Yan Tu, Lei Bao
  Abstract: Item Response Theory is a useful tool for analyzing quantitative data. The sample size will impact the uncertainty of the estimated parameters. It is then important to find out the approximate minimum sample size, with which reliable results can be calculated. In this study, we choose R (with its LTM package) to estimate the parameters with different sample sizes, which are randomly selected from the college students' FCI data collected at The Ohio State University. The total number of the data is 3139. The results show an exponential relationship between sample size and the mean difference of the results obtained with subsets of the data. When sample size is larger than 1600, the difference is tolerable for most items and the mean total difference can be controlled within 5%. This can provide useful guide for future data analysis using IRT.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NIH Award RC1RR028402 and NSF Awards DUE-0633473 and DUE-1044724
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BC07:

The Effect of Problem Format on Students' Answers
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:10PM
  Author: Mark Ellermann, Texas Tech University
806-742-3971, mark.ellermann@ttu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Beth Thacker, Keith West
  Abstract: The same problem written in multiple formats was administered as a quiz in the large introductory physics sections in both the algebra-based and calculus-based classes. The formats included multiple choice only, multiple choice and explain your reasoning, explain your reasoning only, ranking and explaining your reasoning, and a few others. We present the data.
  Footnotes: This project is supported by the NIH grant 5RC1GM090897-02. Sponsored by Beth Thacker.
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BC08:

What Students Learn When Studying Physics Practice Exam Problems
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:10PM - 2:20PM
  Author: Witat Fakcharoenphol
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
217-898-4854, fakchar1@uiuc.edu
  Co-Author(s): Timothy J. Stelzer
  Abstract: We developed a web-based tool to provide students with access to old exam problems and solutions. By controlling the order in which students saw the problems, as well as their access to solutions, we obtained data about student learning by studying old exams problems. Our data suggest that in general students learn from doing old exam problems, and that having access to the problem solutions increases their learning. However, the data also suggest the depth of learning may be relatively shallow. In addition, the data show that doing old exam problems provides impor-tant formative assessment about the student's overall preparedness for the exam, and their particular areas of strength and weakness.
  Footnotes: None
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BC09:

Using Problem-Solving Computer Coaches to Explore Student Decision-Making Difficulties
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:20PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Qing Xu, University of Minnesota-Twin cities
6126259323, qxu@physics.umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): Ken Heller, Leon Hsu, Andrew Mason
  Abstract: The Physics Education Group at the University of Minnesota has been developing Internet physics coaches to help students improve their problem-solving skills in introductory physics. In this talk, we analyze keystroke data collected from students' usage of the computer programs, including the identity and timing information for all students' keystrokes and mouse clicks while using the programs, as well as derived information such as the average time spent on each module. We use the data to try to determine how students use the computer programs, where they might have the most difficulty, and details of their decision-making behavior during the problem-solving process. Other data sources such as students' written solutions will be used as a consistency check.
  Footnotes: None
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BD:

Using Literature to Teach Physics
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:40PM
  Presider: Ann Brandon,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BD01:

My Best NYTimes Physics Applications on Web
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:10PM
  Author: John P. Cise, Austin Community College
512 751 4773, jpcise@austincc.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: From three years developing over 400 physics applications from the NY Times I will show the best applications rich in data verifying physics concepts. Most applications are on mechanical concepts. The site is: http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm. The site lists 12 pages with 40 single one page applications per page. Each single page application contains: brief edited text and graphics from the NY Times, introduction,questions,hints, and answers. I use these pages as: introduction to new concepts in general college physics, extra credit for students, and quiz questions. Students enjoy verifying physics concepts using NY Times current physics applications as seen at this site: http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm
  Footnotes: None
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BD02:

The Physics in Einstein's Dreams
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:10PM - 1:20PM
  Author: Donald R. Franceschetti, The University of Memphis
901-678-5257, dfrncsch@memphis.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Einstein's Dreams by physicist/author Alan Lightman has for years been a popular selection for high school and college summer reading programs and for student presentations as narrative theater. The book describes a number of "dreams" that the young Swiss patent clerk Albert Einstein might have had during the "miracle year" of 1905. While the dream narratives can be read for their entertainment value by people with little knowledge of physics, any physicist reading them will find numerous references to relativity theory, quantum theory, thermodynamics and cosmology. A few of the dreams also reflect aspects of physics student culture and quips that Einstein is believed to have made. These references can be used for teaching and to demonstrate the creative element in physics, which clearly bridges C. P. Snow's two cultures or the alleged left brain/right brain duality. It provides an opening for interaction with literature and history teachers as well. The presentation will discuss a number of the "dreams" and their allusions to physics, and will provide some suggestions for further reading.
  Footnotes: None
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BD03:

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in Physics
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:20PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Igor V. Proleiko, McKinnley Classical Academy
(314) 664 2767, igor.proleiko@slps,org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In a Sherlock Holmes adventure "The Sign of Four" the culmination is the race along the Thames. The relative speeds could be analyzed to discuss the possibility and feasibility of this part of the story. Also a discussion of projectile motion could be made from the data mined from Sir Arthur's description. The exercise is well within the grasp of introductory physics students.
  Footnotes: None
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BD04:

Storytime Science: Another Look at Teaching Physics through Childrens' Literature
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 1:40PM
  Author: Bill Reitz, Retired
330-922-0589, wreitz@neo.rr.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Once upon a time your students' imaginations and curiosity were unleashed through the fantasy of their first picture books. We can recapture some of that excitement if we reopen the classic books and allow them to guide us as we explore the real world in our high school classes. Let us examine some new examples of how children's books can model science processes, lead to science investigations and even act as assessment. This paper is follow-up to the "Seuss Science" presentation given at the Portland Summer Meeting. Additional books not mentioned in that paper will be used.
  Footnotes: None
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BE:

Preparing Minority Students for Graduate School
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:30PM
  Presider: Theodore Hodapp,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BE01:

Physics at Morehouse College: Making a Major Difference!
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Willie S Rockward, Morehouse College
404-614-6036, wrockwar@morehouse.edu
  Co-Author(s): 'Kale Oyedeji, Aakhut E Bak, Carlyle E Moore, John B Howard
  Abstract: Physics is Phun! Physics needs everyone and everyone needs physics! With physics, the UNIVERSE is the limit! These statements are the underlying principles that we, the physics faculty at Morehouse College, embed in our students through experiences in the classroom, laboratory, advisement, mentoring, and outreach programs. How are we making a positive difference by consistently increasing the number of under-represented minorities, especially African American males, in physics? We will present our antidote which includes curriculum, research, advisement, and a few hidden ingredients.
  Footnotes: None
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BE02:

Preparing Minority Students for Graduate School: Timbuktu Academy Approach
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Diola Bagayoko, Southern University and A&M College
225-771-2730, Diola_Bagayoko@subr.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Timbuktu Academy is a comprehensive, systemic mentoring program at Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge, LA (SUBR) (www.phys.subr.edu/timbuktu.htm). To date, the Academy has assisted in the production of 170 minority undergraduate scholars who have earned a Bachelor of Science degree. Seventy of 83 physics graduates, 20 of 29 chemistry graduates, and 22 of 49 engineering graduates have earned graduate degrees or are successfully enrolled in graduate school, with an emphasis on the pursuit of the PhD. The aim of this presentation is to discuss key factors that explain the success of the Academy. They include the rigorous implementation of the Ten-Strand Systemic Mentoring model of the Timbuktu Academy, with extensive research participation on and off campus. They also include standard-based curriculum, teaching, and learning (i.e., SBC, SBT, and SBL). The Timbuktu Academy received several national awards for the above model and results.
  Footnotes: None
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BE03:

APS Minority Bridge Program: Overview, Findings and Directions
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Invited - Peter Muhoro, APS
301-209-3245, muhoro@aps.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Physics provides a fundamental foundation for nearly all major technical innovations, groundbreaking research, and policy recommendations. Physics also ranks at the bottom when considering the fraction of students completing either baccalaureate or doctoral degrees. In addition, the fraction of PhDs awarded to underrepresented minorities has not increased in the past decade despite the growing population of such groups. This talk will discuss some data on the current situation and describe a number of actions by the American Physical Society (APS) and its partnering organizations in addressing these issues, primarily the Minority Bridge Program, a new national initiative that seeks to dramatically increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive PhDs in physics.
  Footnotes: None
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BF:

Spacetime Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:30PM
  Presider: Wolfgang Christian,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BF01:

Completing John Wheeler's Vision: Undergraduate General Relativity
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Panel - Edwin F. Taylor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
781-646-7775, eftaylor@mit.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: John Archibald Wheeler was a radical conservative: Take the laws of physics seriously, then drive them to their limits. He drove general relativity to its limits with the black hole, our "little jugged apocalypse." Wheeler's Rules of Writing include "Simplify! Simplify! Simplify!" For undergraduate general relativity this means (1) Describe curved spacetime with the metric instead of the field equations, which reduces required mathematics to simple calculus. (2) Command the moving stone to obey the Principle of Maximal Aging, a simple extension of the Twin "Paradox." A second edition of Exploring Black Holes with cosmologist Edmund Bertschinger treats the wealth of recent cosmological observations and repairs the first edition's neglect of the dark side of General Covariance: We can choose global coordinates with (almost) complete freedom, so they need have no direct relation to physical measurements and observations.
  Footnotes: None
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BF02:

Einstein for Everyone?
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Panel - Anne J. Cox, Eckerd College
727-864-8435, coxaj@eckerd.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Special relativity for the nonscience student: In an introductory freshman seminar course “Einstein for Everyone” Yes! We know that the physics of special relativity does not require mathematics beyond high school trigonometry, but how often do we offer nonscientists the chance to explore the intuitive and nonintuitive implications of the ideas at the core of spacetime physics? Using one course as an example, we will explore questions of its depth of coverage and its role in the curriculum. This will include examples of sample assignments, student projects as well as simulations that stand at the heart of the course and serve as the course "laboratory."
  Footnotes: None
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BF03:

Visual Aids for Teaching Special Relativity
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Panel - Thomas A. Moore, Pomona College
909-621-6474, tmoore@pomona.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In my experience, successfully teaching special relativity to introductory students is much easier if one extensively uses (1) the geometric analogy for spacetime, and (2) visual aids based on that analogy, including (but not limited to) multiple-observer spacetime diagrams. In this presentation, I will describe some of these visual aids and how such tools can help students reason more intuitively about relativity and thus avoid many common errors and misconceptions, and describe resources one can use in special relativity courses at any level.
  Footnotes: None
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BG:

Energy and the Environment
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 3:00PM
  Presider: John Roeder,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BG01:

Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Richard Flarend, Penn State Altoona
814-931-2750, ref7@psu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Tim Dolney, Jeremy Walsh
  Abstract: A large demand for energy in Pennsylvania is for space heating. Unfortunately, this demand coincides with low winter solar insolence making traditional solar thermal energy impractical for space heating. However it is possible to collect this solar energy in the summer and to store it for later use in the winter using a seasonal thermal energy storage system (STES). Existing STES systems have had a variety of problems due to cost, thermal losses, and/or slow thermal time constants of the storage field. This research has focused on designing and locating a potential site for a solar STES system using an abandoned coal mine that solves many of these problems. The design, dynamic simulation, and estimated performance of such a system will be presented. Construction estimates and return on investment will also be presented for a potential site in which a favorable abandoned mine has been found very close to a K-12 school.
  Footnotes: None
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BG02:

Energy and Power Density in Society
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Abigail R. Mechtenberg, University of Michigan
734-975-0724, amechten@Umich.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: From the dawn of civilization, energy density and power density has been sought and fought after. This talk will walk through the foundation civilization has built for ourselves throughout the technological and nontechnological world and compare it to how nature has evolved. We will ponder if economics has broken a historical global symmetry by making the lowest energy state not the preferable state and ask ourselves why? Ten interactive Societal Ragone Plots will be presented and passed out: from vehicles to robots to hummingbirds. Results from an agent-based model of African electricity microgrids will be presented and juxtaposed to policy implications in the U.S. for our centralized grid with and without nuclear power. Monte-carlo simulation results for a designed U.S. military forward operating base in Afghanistan will be presented to discuss the risk that explains an amazing quote that "the U.S. loses one person, killed or wounded, for every 24 fuel convoys it runs in Afghanistan to run air-conditioners and power diesel generators." Energy and power density engages with society -- from African health care to U.S. military risk to everyday U.S. civilian activities.
  Footnotes: None
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BG03:

A Broad Look at the Energy Curriculum
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Invited - Shawn Reeves, EnergyTeachers.org
607-216-7289, shawn@energyteachers.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Having consulted a broad sweep of educators teaching about energy for several years for EnergyTeachers.org, Mr. Reeves will comment on the integration of energy curriculum into the physics curriculum as well as the possibility of energy becoming its own field to rival the importance of physics. Learning new and even traditional energy concepts presents a challenge in the world of standardized or traditional curriculum, especially concerning sequence and rigor. Textbooks, professional development, lesson plans, field experiences, workforce training, and academic pathways need to be developed further. The content and structure of EnergyTeachers.org represents the wide range of answers to such challenges for K-16 and informal educators, but there is much work to be done. What role will physics educators have in this work?
  Footnotes: None
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BG04:

Growth, Population, Resources, and the Meaning of Sustainability
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:30PM - 3:00PM
  Author: Invited - Albert A. Bartlett, University of Colorado at Boulder
303-443-0595, Albert.Bartlett@Colorado.EDU
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Because they are used carelessly and indiscriminately, the words "sustainable" and "sustainability" have lost their meaning. The reasons for this loss of meaning range from simple carelessness to commercial greed. The ultimate contradiction is the oxymoron "sustainable growth." We will examine the definition of "sustainability" and then will look at what it has to mean in terms of growth, population, and the extraction of mineral and fuel resources from the Earth.
  Footnotes: None
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BH:

Induction and Mentoring of Physics Teachers
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 3:10PM
  Presider: Monica Plisch,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BH01:

The Best of Both Worlds
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Doug K. Panee
Brigham Young University / Oak Canyon Jr. High
801 318-3237, doug.panee@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: I have a unique perspective of "Developing a Network of Cooperating Teacher." I've been a cooperating teacher for the past 18 years for 20 student teachers and now I am a CFA, Clinical Faculty Assistant or TIR, at BYU. I have the best of both worlds because now I have the wonderful opportunity to support many of my friends that are cooperating teachers as a university mentor. I will share how this network has supported me as a cooperating teacher as well as how I and BYU help support the cooperating teachers in our network.
  Footnotes: I am sponsored by Duane Merrell of BYU
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BH02:

Mentor Me...Mentor You
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Jon Anderson, Centennial High School
612-845-3468, anderson.jon.p@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: New physics teachers need mentoring! In addition to the need to know and understand their content, they need direction deciding upon appropriate demonstrations, analogies, examples, and labs, pacing of topics, seniors in the spring, classroom management, lab supply budgets, and much more. This talk will explore the role that mentors play in attracting new physics teachers, in helping them through those critical first years, and in retaining them in the profession. As a former mentee, I can speak to the value of all of these.
  Footnotes: None
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BH03:

Training the Future
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Invited - Jan Mader, Great Falls High School
406-268-6388, jan_mader@gfps.k21.mt.us
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: As I near retirement I am beginning to panic. Who will take my place? Will they care as much as I do? Will teaching be their passion not just a job? With the diminishing number of science teachers entering the "pool" and even fewer in physics, what can veteran teachers of science do to encourage beginning teachers to enter the profession and remain in the profession when the going gets tough?
  Footnotes: None
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BH04:

A Case for Induction--Keeping New Teachers in the Classroom
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:30PM - 3:00PM
  Author: Invited - Duane B Merrell, Brigham Young University
801-717-6038, duane_merrell@byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Mentoring from a master teacher during student teaching may be the most important semester in the preparation of a new teacher. But even this mentoring does not prepare a student for what happens during the first year when they have a classroom full of their own students. I want to follow the story of two students who without induction after they graduated most likely would not be teaching now. Retention of these new teachers is as important as training new teachers. I think our role in helping with the mentoring and induction of these new teachers is as important and on par with the efforts that we make to help these students get their teaching licenses. I know these students have graduated from our teacher preparation programs but they still need to see that friendly face, hear that friendly voice. These students just need to know you as their teacher preparation mentor are still there and care. I will try to show how I think that the two students I have talked about above may not be teaching if they had not been confident that a university mentor would help.
  Footnotes: None
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BH05:

Connecting Teacher Preparation to Professional Practice
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 3:00PM - 3:10PM
  Author: Eugenia Etkina, Rutgers University
732-932-7496, eugenia.etkina@gse.rutgers.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In this talk I will describe how the Rutgers Physics Teacher Preparation program connects pre-service training to post-graduation professional development and practice. The key here is to use social networks and face-to-face meetings as two components of a professional learning community. I will show how one can maintain such a community with very little time investment and no additional funding. The learning community not only supports beginning teachers during their most difficult years of teaching but also allows pre-service teachers to have high quality student teaching experience. I will share the achievements of the community and the difficulties that arise. Rutgers has been producing large numbers of physics teachers for the past eight years. Over 90% of these teachers remain in the profession.
  Footnotes: None
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BI:

Cross Campus Collaboration: What I Learned From the Liberal Arts About Teaching Physics
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:40PM
  Presider: Stephanie Magleby,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BI01:

Brigham Young University's 15-Week University Course
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - R. Steven Turley, Brigham Young University
8014223095, turley@byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Susan Gong, Tyler Jarvis
  Abstract: Brigham Young University's "15-Week University" course brought together students and faculty with diverse backgrounds and wide-ranging ability to experiment with learning principles as they applied to physics, calculus, English, and music. The challenge was to explore core ideas with enough depth and rigor to ensure that gains in learning could be retained, improved, and applied for long-term growth. A learning community emerged as everyone became a learner and teacher engaged in: 1) identifying key elements and core ideas, 2) maximizing resources through innovative use of technology, and 3) solving challenging problems that connected fundamental pinciples to concrete skills and personal values. Results included substantial (in some cases dramatic) increases in quantitative skills and writing ability, and enthusiasm for learning in general. The synergy of this wide-ranging learning experience happened as participants rotated their teacher/learner roles, connected ideas and information, and reframed their knowledge from multiple perspectives.
  Footnotes: None
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BI02:

Behind the 15-Week University
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Susan P. Gong, Brigham Young University
603 743-1447, spgong@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Steve Turley
  Abstract: The 15-Week U was an experience of re-imagining classroom relationships, content, and time. Rather than treating the inevitable spread in ability and background as a hindrance, this class emphasized and heightened the differences by shifting learner and teacher roles. Teachers from the various disciplines of the course became model learners as the topics shifted. Students with certain strengths became teachers as the course emphasis changed. Such shifts created a rich source of individualized input for every member of the community and multiplied the sources of energy and motivation for learning. The interdisciplinary nature of the course meant that content was viewed from multiple perspectives. Rather than dilute content, this framework intensified both quantitative and non-quantitative thinking. Students with little science background made surprising leaps forward in their engagement and competence, and students with a stronger background consolidated the magnified their grasp of skills and subject matter.
  Footnotes: None
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BI03:

The Physics of Theatre: Influences on Teaching and Research
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:10PM
  Author: Eric C. Martell, Millikin University
217-766-9078, emartell@millikin.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Physics of Theatre project was started to address a clear need within the theatrical community for better understanding of physics concepts in order to design and build increasingly more complex and potentially dangerous equipment safely and efficiently. My efforts within the project are in two main areas: 1) experimentally studying the properties of materials commonly used in theatre and 2) educating theatre technicians about the principles of physics through lectures, workshops, and the development of pedagogical materials. Through this project, we have developed lecture materials and labs that I use in both introductory and advanced undergraduate classes. I have also been able to expand my research interests into areas which are accessible to undergraduates as early as their sophomore year. The physics in these projects is not particularly advanced, but students can develop a much deeper understanding of what they did and have true ownership of their projects.
  Footnotes: None
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BI04:

Introductory Physics at a Small Campus
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:10PM - 2:20PM
  Author: Gabriela Popa, Ohio University Zansville
7405881469, popag@ohio.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Traditionally, introductory physics courses require a good handling of mathematical manipulations. Many students come to college with a desire to learn physics, and they say that they like it. But when they take college physics they find the mathematics involved in it challenging. However their desire to do well is not enough sometimes to solve problems. Many students have a good feeling for the concepts and like laboratory experiments. In an introductory physics class at a small college, the student population is very diverse in background and expectations. Talking with my colleagues from other disciplines I learn about their type of assignments, and I offered my students choices. I will present different types of choices for in class and at home assignments.
  Footnotes: None
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BI05:

Development of Active Learning Tools for a Course on Physics and Music
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:20PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Heather Whitney, Wheaton College
6307525897, heather.whitney@wheaton.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The physics education research literature provides a wealth of information on active-learning procedures, such as interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs), peer instruction facilitated with clickers, or tutorial systems. However, much of this material has been focused on their use in courses that cover the canon of topics, such as introductory physics courses designed for science majors or conceptual physics courses. Courses that investigate the connections between physics and music are common in physics department course offerings for general education purposes, and they provide an important opportunity to instruct students who may not otherwise take a course in the field. A suite of these tools has been developed for a course on physics and music. Discussion will include clicker ILDs, clicker questions, and lab-based activities, all designed to enhance the learning of students in topics such as motion, oscillations and waves, and sound.
  Footnotes: None
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BI06:

Physics for Filmmakers: Goals, Tracker Labs, and Projects
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:30PM - 2:40PM
  Author: Timothy L. McCaskey
Columbia College Chicago - Dept. of Science and Mathematics
312-369-7765, tmccaskey@colum.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Columbia College offers an introductory, algebra-based mechanics course called "Physics for Filmmakers." The course is for students who wish to learn how to use the laws of physics in making more accurate and/or artistically deliberate choices in their filmmaking. We debunk common movie errors and misconceptions, and students must also complete a film project that demonstrates correct physics in some way. In this talk, I will discuss how we use Tracker (http://www.cabrillo.edu/~dbrown/tracker/) in our labs to teach both filming ideas and physics concepts, some final film projects we have seen, and how we use PER-influenced ideas to further support our learning goals.
  Footnotes: None
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BJ:

Astronomy Teaching and Learning
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:50PM
  Presider: Spencer Buckner,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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BJ01:

Near-Earth Asteroids: Risk Assessment with Middle School Students
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:10PM
  Author: Kathryn E. Devine, The College of Idaho
208 459 5064, kdevine@collegeofidaho.edu
  Co-Author(s): Robin Cruz, Ann Koga, James Dull
  Abstract: The College of Idaho (C of I), located in Caldwell, ID, runs a cooperative summer program with Syringa Middle School (Caldwell, ID). This program, titled The C of I/Syringa Math and Science Summer Institute (MSSI), is now in its third year. MSSI is an educational enrichment program for Caldwell 7th and 8th grade students that specifically targets students who demonstrate potential for academic success but who are at risk for dropping out of school. The MSSI provides enrichment activities in science/engineering with a strong mathematical component. The 8th grade students spend the week-long program studying near-Earth asteroids and probability. The students discover what types of asteroids pose a risk to civilization, and apply their knowledge of probability to determine whether civilization is, indeed, at risk. This talk will focus on the misconceptions MSSI students have about probability and asteroid collisions, as well as the benefits of a summer enrichment program for these students.
  Footnotes: None
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BJ02:

Astronomical Imaging for Introductory Honors Astronomy Students
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:10PM - 1:20PM
  Author: Robert D. Moore
University of West Georgia, Dept. of Physics
678-839-4096, rmoore@westga.edu
  Co-Author(s): Bob Powell
  Abstract: The University of West Georgia has acquired several astronomical cameras and guided telescopes to accommodate an increasing number of introductory astronomy students and projects that are being conducted by students. This equipment was purchased using local Tech Fee grants. Beginning in the fall semester 2010, honors astronomy students are required to image two celestial objects and to process those images. A majority of these students are non-science majors. Students are given a CD with their images and the images made by their classmates. During the first two semesters of this requirement, the images made by students are excellent, and the student attitudes about the work are positive.
  Footnotes: None
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BJ03:

Problem Solving and Epistemology in Nonquantitative Introductory Science Classes
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:20PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Bradley McCoy, Azusa Pacific University
6264724092, bmccoy@apu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: General-studies science classes at many universities, such as physical science, earth science, or astronomy, stress memorization and repetition of concepts. This approach leaves students with little appreciation for how science is used to explain phenomena from general principles. We present a novel instructional technique for an earth science class in which the students are instructed in the use of a general problem-solving strategy, adapted from well-known quantitative problem-solving strategies, in order to train the students in how to apply physical principles. Preliminary data using the Epistemological Beliefs Assessment for Physical Science has shown that explicit training in problem solving significantly improves students' epistemology.
  Footnotes: None
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BJ05:

Astronomy, History, and Computer Simulations: Teaching the Nature of Science
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:40PM - 1:50PM
  Author: Todd K. Timberlake, Berry College
(706) 368-5622, ttimberlake@berry.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Introductory astronomy courses are among the most popular science courses taken by non-science majors in college. As a result, these courses represent a crucial opportunity to educate students about the nature of science. I have developed two courses that focus on teaching the nature of science through an exploration of the history of astronomy. One course examines the development of planetary astronomy from Aristotle to Isaac Newton. The other course follows changing notions about our place among the stars from Aristotle to Hubble. In both courses, students make frequent use of computer programs to simulate observations and to visualize theories. The goal of these activities is to help students see how scientific theories are judged against empirical data, consistency with other knowledge, and aesthetic criteria. Course materials are available at http://facultyweb.berry.edu/ttimberlake/copernican/ and http://facultyweb.berry.edu/ttimberlake/galaxies/.
  Footnotes: None
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CA:

Use and Misuse of Lasers
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:30PM
  Presider: Sam Sampere,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CA01:

How Physics Teachers Learned to Love the Laser
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Invited - Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr., Kenyon College
740-427-2989, Greenslade@kenyon.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: One can become almost incoherent trying to remember how we taught physics without the laser. In April 1963 the first issue of The Physics Teacher appeared, and the journal soon began to carry seductive advertisements for lasers showing how the physics teacher could use this wonderful new device in the lecture room and the laboratory. Two years later the Kenyon College physics department paid $1,650 for a relatively short-lived laser, and I was hooked. In this talk I will use advertisements from TPT to show how the prices decreased and our expertise in using the laser increased. Soon it became as indispensible to teaching physics as a multimeter or a meter stick.
  Footnotes: None
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CA02:

Laser Safety
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Invited - Thomas A. Machacek
University of Nebraska ? Lincoln/Environmental Health and Safety
(402) 472-8676, tmachacek1@unl.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Laser safety is not always given the attention it might warrant. When one evaluates the level of laser safety required, using a laser pointer is substantially different than aligning a Class 4 laser. This presentation will emphasize basic laser safety when using Class 3B or Class 4 lasers in a university setting but could easily be applied to any similar facility or classroom environment. Laser safety information presented and practices described will be in accordance with the American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers (ANSI Z136.1 - 2007) and CLSOs' Best Practices in Laser Safety (Laser Institute of America - 2008).
  Footnotes: None
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CB:

PER: Student Reasoning I
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:50PM
  Presider: Stamatis Vokos,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CB01:

Student Reasoning about Graphical Representations of Definite Integrals
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 6:40PM
  Author: Rabindra R. Bajracharya
Physics Department, University of Maine
2076029860, ab_study@yahoo.com
  Co-Author(s): John R. Thompson, Thomas Wemyss
  Abstract: Physics students are expected to apply the mathematics learned in their mathematics courses to physics concepts and problems. Few PER studies have distinguished between difficulties students have with physics concepts and those with either mathematics concepts, application of those concepts, or the representations used to connect the math and the physics. We are conducting empirical studies of student responses to mathematics questions dealing with graphical representations of (single-variable) integration. Reasoning in written responses could roughly be put into three major categories related to particular features of the graphs: area under the curve, position of the function, and shape of the curve. In subsequent individual interviews, we varied representational features to explore the depth and breadth of the contextual nature of student reasoning, with an emphasis on negative integrals. Results suggest an incomplete understanding of the criteria that determine the sign of a definite integral.
  Footnotes: None
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CB02:

Expanding the FCI to Concepts of Energy-Work, Momentum, and Rotational Dynamics
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:40PM - 6:50PM
  Author: Alex Chediak, California Baptist University
951-343-4912, achediak@calbaptist.edu
  Co-Author(s): Katrina Hay, Carolina Ilie, H. Trevor Johnson-Steigelman
  Abstract: The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) has deservedly become a widely accepted assessment tool. The metric "normalized gain" can be used to evaluate conceptual mastery in a high school, college, or university-level mechanics course. Left out of this analysis, however, is student mastery of other physics concepts typically presented in the same course. For example, conservation of energy and momentum, as well as rotational motion, receive virtually no coverage on the FCI (or, for that matter, the Mechanics Baseline Test). The authors will present a revised assessment tool, one that incorporates the strengths of the FCI, but also assesses these other mechanics-related concepts. Our tool will preserve the straightforward multiple-choice format of the FCI. Ten additional questions have been written, in part inspired by material from the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington and in part inspired by the authors' own experiences with common student misperceptions.
  Footnotes: None
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CB03:

The Impact of Virtual Experiments on Student Reasoning in Physics
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:50PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Jiawu Fan, Beijing Normal University
6142922450, wojiaofjw@yahoo.com.cn
  Co-Author(s): Shaona Zhou, Chunhui Du, Jing Han, Lei Bao
  Abstract: Using computer technology, we develop a virtual reality (VR) platform that supports interactive physics activities. We use the platform to help students conduct guided explorations to learning physics concepts and reasoning. A teaching experiment with two random selected groups of students was conducted. Students were asked to complete a one-hour exploration on one dimensional motion (1D motion) and circular motion. Using a cross-controlled design, we find that students doing virtual experiments outperform their peers doing paper-based problem solving. Supported in part by NIH Award RC1RR028402 and NSF Awards DUE-0633473 and DUE-1044724
  Footnotes: None
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CB04:

Probing Student Understanding with Alternative Questioning Strategies
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:10PM
  Author: Jeffrey M. Hawkins, The University of Maine
2075706067, jeffrey.hawkins@maine.edu
  Co-Author(s): Brian W. Frank, John R Thompson, Michael C Wittmann, Thomas M Wemyss
  Abstract: Common research methodology uses research tasks that ask students to identify a correct answer and justify their answer choice. We propose expanding the array of research tasks to access different knowledge that students might have. By asking students to discuss answers they may not have chosen naturally, we can investigate students' abilities to explain something that is already established or to disprove an incorrect response. The results of these research tasks also provide us with information about how students' responses vary across the different tasks. We discuss three underused question types and their possible benefits. Additionally, we present results from data gathered using these question types and contrast these with results gathered using a traditional question.
  Footnotes: None
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CB05:

Students' Contradictory Commitments in Damped Harmonic Motion Problems
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:10PM - 7:20PM
  Author: Adam Kaczynski, The University of Maine
906-553-4232, A.Kaczynski@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Michael C. Wittmann
  Abstract: Students working through the Intermediate Mechanics Tutorials on damped harmonic motion are expected to use mathematical, graphical, and physical reasoning, as well as their intuitions. We observe that students remain committed to assumptions they bring to the problem, not using the instructional resources provided by the tutorials. We also observe moments when commitment to an assumption in, for example, mathematical reasoning conflicts with a conclusion found through physical reasoning. We will discuss the effect of multiple commitments on students' classroom discussion and the way that students reconcile contradictory commitments and conclusions.
  Footnotes: None
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CB06:

How Students' Conceptual Structure Relates to their Sophistication of Reasoning
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:20PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Mojgan Matloob haghanikar, Kansas State University
7855327167, mojgan@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sytil Murphy, Dean Zollman
  Abstract: While investigating the impact of interactive learning strategies on pre-service elementary science teachers, we devised open-ended content questions focusing on the application of learned concepts to new contexts. We designed a protocol to evaluate students' responses through different lenses. First, we classified concepts into three types: descriptive, hypothetical, and theoretical [1], and categorized the level of abstraction of the responses in terms of the types of concepts and the links between them [2]. Second, we devised a rubric based on Bloom's revised taxonomy [3] with seven traits (both knowledge types and cognitive processes) and a defined set of criteria to evaluate each trait. Looking at the same responses with both lenses we can investigate the correlation between the level of abstraction and the sophistication of students' reasoning as indicated by the traits of our rubric. Supported by NSF grant ESI-055 4594.
  Footnotes: 1. Lawson, A.E, et. al, (2000). What kinds of scientific concepts exist? Concept construction and intellectual development in college biology. JRST,37(9) 2. M. Nieswandt & K. Bellomo, JRST,46 (3) 3. L.W. Anderson & D.R. Krathwohl, A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. New York: Longman (2001)
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CB07:

Learning Mathematics in a Physics Classroom
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:30PM - 7:40PM
  Author: Jing Wang, Eastern Kentucky University
859-6221526, jing.wang@eku.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jerry Cook
  Abstract: It has long been known that a students' entering mathematical skill level is one of the best indicators of success in introductory physics courses.[1, 2] Physics teachers expect that students who meet the prerequisite requirement of an introductory physics course will be well-prepared, however, this is not always the case. In reality, every physics teacher faces the challenging question: Can we identify and save the students who meet the required course prerequisite yet who are not really prepared? A recent study at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Eastern Kentucky University suggests that when students take physics, their mathematical skills improve significantly, perhaps even more so than they do in a traditional mathematics course. This work will focus on the analysis of what mathematical skills have been improved, and reveal the link between the course content and mathematical skill improvement.
  Footnotes: [1] I. A. Halloun and D. Hestenes, The initial knowledge state of college physics students. American Journal of Physics, 53(11), 1043-1055 (1985) [2] D. E. Meltzer, The relationship between mathematics preparation and conceptual learning gains in physics: A possible ?hidden variable? in diagnostic pretest scores. American Journal of Physics, 70(12), 1259-1268 (2002)
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CB08:

Students' Understanding of the Concept of Sampling
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:40PM - 7:50PM
  Author: Shaona Zhou, South China Normal University
614-292-2450, zhou.shaona@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Hua Xiao, Jing Han, Yu'an Pi, Lei Bao
  Abstract: Sampling is an important scientific reasoning ability frequently used in experimental design and data interpretation. As part of the research on assessment of students' scientific reasoning skills, we designed a series of multiple-choice instruments that probe students' understanding of the concept of sampling. The assessment was carried out among the students from grade four to grade 11 to study the development of students' understanding about sampling which was involved in the scientific context. Results from students at different grade levels indicated that students did not understand and consider the concept of sampling as a significant scientific reasoning skill until grade eight.
  Footnotes: **Supported in part by NIH Award RC1RR028402 and NSF Awards DUE-0633473 and DUE-1044724
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CC:

Best Practices in the Use of Educational Technologies III
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 8:00PM
  Presider: Cathy Ezrailson,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CC01:

PhET Sims for Middle School -- Design, Use, and Classroom Implementation
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 6:40PM
  Author: Noah S. Podolefsky,
303-641-8217, Noah.Podolefsky@Colorado.EDU
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The PhET Interactive Simulations project is a collection of more than 100 simulations of physical phenomena that create animated, interactive, game-like environments in which students learn through scientist-like exploration. While the sims are designed and tested with introductory college-level courses, anecdotal data from middle school teachers suggested that PhET sims could be used effectively with fifth-eighth graders -- with teachers citing the intuitive controls and engaging, game-like style. These reports motivated us to study how sims can be best designed for and used in middle schools more systematically. We have conducted numerous interviews with middle school students using PhET sims, and collected video and observational data from middle school classes using sims. We will present our findings from these studies, including effective design principles for middle school sims, insights into how middle school students learn from sims, and benefits of and challenges to using sim-based activities in middle school classes.
  Footnotes: This work is funded by the Hewlett Foundation, NSF DRK12 Grant #1020362, The O'Donnell Foundation and the University of Colorado at Boulder.
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CC02:

Going Beyond End of Chapter Problems in LON-CAPA
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:40PM - 6:50PM
  Author: Boris Korsunsky, Weston High School
781-786-5800, korsunskyb@mail.weston.org
  Co-Author(s): Raluca E. Teodorescu, Carolin N Cardamone, Saif Rayyan, David Pritchard
  Abstract: We describe the open-source library of physics problems we are collecting in LON-CAPA (http://loncapa.mit.edu). Currently, the library features both traditional and research-based problems intended to expose students to various contexts, problem features, knowledge and cognitive processes. We are adding conceptual questions and challenge problems that require out-of-the-box thinking. The conceptual questions were developed at Ohio State University and MIT. The challenge problems are inspired by various tasks published in The Physics Teacher. 1-3] We are planning to evaluate the difficulty and pedagogical effectiveness of those problems using Item Response Theory (IRT). This permits determination of a student's skill independent of which problems they do. We welcome collaborators willing to add their problems to our library.
  Footnotes: [1] Korsunsky, B. (2004) Ready, SET, Go! A research-based approach to problem solving. The Physics Teacher, 42, 493-497. [2] Korsunsky, B. (2001-present) Physics Challenges for Teachers and Students (a monthly column). The Physics Teacher. The library of past Challenges is online at http://tpt.aapt.org/features/physics_challenge_solutions. [3] Korsunsky, B. (1995). Braintwisters for physics students. The Physics Teacher, 33, 550-553.
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CC03:

First Assessment of the Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:50PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Raluca E. Teodorescu
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
615-253-5729, rteodore@mit.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sara Julin, Analia Barrantes, Daniel Seaton, David Pritchard
  Abstract: We present the first evaluation of our open-source Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics (ILEM)[1] - http://loncapa.mit.edu. The centerpiece of this environment is a collection of multi-level research-based homework sets organized by topic and cognitive complexity, whose design helps students learn physics problem solving. These sets are associated with learning modules that contain short expositions of the content supplemented by integrated open-access videos, worked examples, simulations, and tutorials. In our evaluation of homework problems, we analyze student attempts, preferences, and performance on different types of problems (e.g. representation, ranking and strategy writing problems). In our evaluation of content, we analyze observations generated by student comments in the discussion boards and during critical thinking activities. We continue to expand and improve the content and we welcome users and collaborators.
  Footnotes: [1] R. Teodorescu, A. Pawl, S. Rayyan, A. Barrantes and D. E. Pritchard, Toward an Integrated Online Environment, 2010 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings, edited by S. Rebello, M. Sabella and C. Singh
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CC04:

Expanding LON-CAPA Homework Sets to Include Student-Generated Graphs
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:10PM
  Author: James T. Laverty, Michigan State University
419-944-5802, laverty1@msu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Gerd Kortemeyer
  Abstract: The ability to work with graphs is a necessary skill in all of the sciences, yet students still struggle with it. Previous graph-related problems in LON-CAPA (http://www.lon-capa.org/) required students to pick the correct graph from a set of graphs or infer data from a given graph. Data gathered from the Test of Understanding Graphics -- Kinematics (TUG-K) confirms that these problem types only minimally improve representation translation skills. A new problem type has been developed in LON-CAPA that allows students to construct (draw) graphs for themselves, in response to a given textual (or formulaic) description. These graphs are then checked by the server, which determines whether or not the student submitted graph is correct or incorrect. We present some preliminary experiences with this new problem type, while a study is under way to test the effectiveness of this approach.
  Footnotes: None
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CC05:

Item Response Theory Analysis of the Mechanics Baseline Test
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:10PM - 7:20PM
  Author: Carolin N. Cardamone, MIT
617-324-2731, cnc@mit.edu
  Co-Author(s): Saif Rayyan, Daniel Seaton, Raluca Teodorescu, Dave Pritchard
  Abstract: Item Response Theory (IRT) algorithms are being developed to better assess student performance in our Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics (ILEM; [1]). A student's skill, as determined by IRT, provides more information than the traditional student score because it takes into account universally calibrated problem difficulties. Importantly, it allows determination of skill on a universal scale independent of which questions the student answers. Our approaches seek to dynamically update student and class skill level in ILEM throughout the course based on their performance, rather than relying primarily on the gain from pre/post testing. We present results comparing IRT and pre/post gain analysis of the Mechanics Baseline Inventory Test, including discussion of item parameters for the 26 questions on the MBT exam.
  Footnotes: [1] R. Teodorescu, A. Pawl, S. Rayyan, A. Barrantes and D. E. Pritchard, Toward an Integrated Online Environment, 2010 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings, edited by S. Rebello, M. Sabella and C. Singh
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CC06:

Integration of Computer-based Pre-, in- and Post-lecture Activities in Physics
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:20PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Kelvin Cheng, Texas Tech University
806-742-2992, kelvin.cheng@ttu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Amy Pietan, Mehmet Calglar, Hani Dulli
  Abstract: Monitoring and assessing the students' learning activities before (pre-), during (in-) and after (post-) lecture teaching in a large (more than 150 students) introductory physics class are important to evaluate the efficacies of new teaching pedagogies and methods. At Texas Tech, an online and integrative computer-based approach of using an interactive pre-lecture Just-in-Time tutorial, in-lecture Peer-Instruction clickers, and post-lecture Lab and online homework was implemented in the last two semesters. Using standard mechanics concepts and baseline surveys as well as independent classroom observations, the effects of these computer-based technologies on students' learning of physics concepts and problem-solving skills among different student subgroups taught by TAs and lecturers using different levels of student interactive engagement in class are investigated. Comparisons among computer-based technology interventions and their predictive roles in learning outcomes will be examined using Pearson correlation and multivariate analysis methods. (This work was supported by an NIH-STEM grant 1RC1GM090897)
  Footnotes: None
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CC07:

PASE: A Professional Development and Equipment Loaner Program
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:30PM - 7:40PM
  Author: Susan M. Engelhardt
S. C. Governor's School for Science and Mathematics
843-383-3901x3950, engelhardt@gssm.k12.sc.us
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Learn about the Portable Advance Science Exploration (PASE) program and how it provides professional development and equipment loans to middle and high school teachers, allowing over 40 teachers to have engaged 3,500+ students with inquiry-based labs using technology at no cost to the teachers. PASE is an outreach program sponsored by the South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics (GSSM). Also learn about other outreach initiatives conducted by GSSM which reach hundreds of teachers and thousands of students.
  Footnotes: *Sponsored by Larry Engelhardt
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CC08:

Teaching Kids to Create Computer Simulations Using EJS
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:40PM - 7:50PM
  Author: Larry Engelhardt, Francis Marion University
843-661-1452, lengelhardt@fmarion.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Easy Java Simulations (EJS) is a free, open-source tool for creating interactive computer simulations. This summer (June 2011) I will be using EJS to teach 9th and 10th graders to create computer simulations in a week-long (summer science camp) course. Will we succeed? What will they create? Come find out! During the past year I have also used EJS for teaching multiple undergraduate courses in computational physics, so I will address the specific challenges and opportunities that arose when teaching high school students versus college students.
  Footnotes: None
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CC09:

Electricity and Magnetism Self-Testing and Test Construction Tool
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:50PM - 8:00PM
  Author: John C Stewart, University of Arkansas
479-445-2522, johns@uark.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk presents an online resource for teaching and evaluating introductory electricity and magnetism classes. The resource contains a library of highly characterized, multiple-choice, conceptual, and quantitative electricity and magnetism problems and solutions all linked to a free online textbook. The library contains over 1000 classroom tested problems. Each problem is characterized by the complexity of its solution and by the fundamental intellectual steps found in the solution. Exam construction, administration, and analysis tools are provided through the resource's website. Problems may be downloaded for use in exams or as clicker questions. A self-testing tool is provided for students or instructors, an excellent tool for brushing up on conceptual electricity and magnetism. Conceptual inventory scores produced by the site are normed against the Conceptual Survey in Electricity and Magnetism. There is no cost associated with using any of the facilities of the site and you can begin to use the site immediately. Supported by NSF - DUE 0535928. Site address http://physinfo.uark.edu/physicsonline.
  Footnotes: None
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CD:

Alternative Assessments and Practicums
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:30PM
  Presider: Pat Callahan,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CD01:

Using Chapter Challenges in Active Physics
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Invited - John L. Roeder, The Calhoun School
212-497-6500, JLRoeder@aol.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Chapter Challenges in Active Physics provide an alternative way to assess student learning. The author will share how he has used them in his 17 years of teaching Active Physics to ninth graders at The Calhoun School in New York City.
  Footnotes: None
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CD02:

Project-based Curricula in the Active Learning Environment
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:10PM
  Author: Simon P. Huss, Windward School
310-738-7438, shuss@windwardschool.org
  Co-Author(s): Rebecca Carter
  Abstract: Windward's Science and Technology Department has incorporated several unit-long, hands-on projects into the introductory level through AP Physics level curricula. Project-based learning provides more meaningful context for instruction and creates opportunities for teamwork, limited competition, and the activation of multiple learning modalities. Student role selection, differentiated instruction, methodologies for varied assessment, and project inspiration are all discussed. Specific strategies for implementation of a few select projects are discussed in detail.
  Footnotes: None
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CD03:

Problem-based Learning in Physics Instruction
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:10PM - 7:20PM
  Author: David G. Schultz, Maine East High School
(847) 825-4484 ext. 1362, dschultz@maine207.org
  Co-Author(s): Rebecca Stewart, Tom Foley
  Abstract: Problem-based learning (PBL) focuses on experiential learning organized around the investigation and resolution of a real-world, or "messy" problem. The problem is typically one that is closely tied to students' communities and involves stakeholders from both within and outside of a particular school building. We present several examples of how the PBL methodology has been successfully applied to secondary-level physics instruction. In these examples, students 1) investigated how to incorporate renewable energy technologies within their school district, and 2) evaluated the impacts of noise pollution upon the school environment. In PBL projects, student evaluation relies heavily upon final presentations to stakeholders, and is more authentic than traditional pencil and paper tests. Students master curricular goals while at the same time achieving deeper levels of understanding through inquiry and the exploration of multifaceted problems.
  Footnotes: None
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CD04:

What Are the Effects of Self-Assessment Preparation?
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:20PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Sara Severance, University of Colorado Boulder
303 829 5949, sarasev14@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This research was conducted by an urban middle school science teacher who sought to investigate the effects of self-assessment on student performance. A group of students were asked to give themselves a score on each learning target assessed in class and to provide evidence for their decision. Student self-assessment scores were compared to scores given by the teacher to see if students who accurately assessed their own learning scored higher on final assessments than students who did not. Assessment scores between groups of students who completed the self-assessment preparation and students who did not were also analyzed. Preliminary findings will be discussed in this presentation as well as further implications for this teacher's classroom.
  Footnotes: sponsored by Valerie Otero University of Colorado Boulder
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CE:

Online Courses and Simulated Learning
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:30PM
  Presider: David Weaver,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CE01:

Multivariable Regression Analysis of Online Physics Success
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Invited - Erik L. Jensen, Chemeketa Community College
503.589.7838, erik.jensen@chemeketa.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: I used a multivariable regression to analyze success (grades) in six years of online and campus-based introductory physics classes at Chemeketa Community College. I analyzed independent variables including incoming GPA, grade in trigonometry, gender, age, home institution, and delivery method to determine their effects on success. I found that incoming GPA, home institution (Chemeketa students fared worse than outside students), and delivery method (there was an online "penalty" of about half a grade) significantly impacted success while other independent variables did not. In addition to presenting the multivariable regression analysis, I will provide both evidence of academic honesty and evidence that my students conduct substantive labs at home; these appear to be points of considerable skepticism among physics educators. I will also provide data and practices regarding retention, a challenge for any class with any delivery method at a community college.
  Footnotes: None
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CE02:

Taking Advantage of Sensor Technology to Create a Home-Based Kinematics Class
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:10PM
  Author: Richard Gelderman, Western Kentucky University
270 745 6203, gelderman@wku.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Sonic ranger sensors have been successfully used in physics labs and play a major role in the design of reformed introductory physics classes. We have recently taken advantage of advances in the portability and ease of use of sonic rangers to develop a lab-based kinematics course delivered completely online. Following established curriculum plans utilizing progressively scaffolded interactive labs, this course uses digital data collection and analysis as the foundation of an interactive peer learning experience. Students in our online "Concepts of Force and Motion" course are required to purchase an equipment kit that includes a USB-interface motion detector and data collection and analysis software. The overwhelming success of this effort is how much students enjoy using this lab equipment at their home. Our experience is that every student has managed to overcome any initial trepidation, to complete the class with a positive reaction to both the technology and the emphasis on experimentation.
  Footnotes: None
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CE03:

Simulations of Mechanics with DynaMo
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:10PM - 7:20PM
  Author: Michael G. Duffy, Emory & Henry College
276 944-6204, mgduffy@ehc.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: DynaMo is a program for developing, editing, and delivering simulations of a wide range of physical systems typically encountered in introductory physics and classical mechanics classes. I will be demonstrating a variety of newly created simulations and discussing various ways they can be delivered to students.
  Footnotes: None
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CE04:

Student Use of Geometer's Sketchpad to Model Physics Concepts
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:20PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Dale Yoder-Short, Iowa Mennonite School
319-656-2073, dyodershort@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Geometer's Sketchpad by Key Curriculum Press was created as a tool for teachers and students to model geometric situations. We have adapted it to create dynamic models of physics phenomena. We will show how to create an illustration and give examples of teacher and student sketches. We suggest the student is learning physics by building the sketch and then by using it as a tool to explore and analyze physics concepts.
  Footnotes: None
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CF:

Physics of Sports
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:50PM
  Presider: Bruce Mason,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CF01:

Using Physics for Baseball Analysis
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Invited - Alan M. Nathan, University of Illinois
217-333-0965, a-nathan@illinois.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The trajectory of a baseball moving through the air is very different from the one we teach in our introductory classes in which the only force is that due to gravity. In reality, the aerodynamic drag force (which retards the motion) and the Magnus force on a spinning baseball (which causes the ball to curve) play very important roles that are crucial to many of the subtleties of the game. These forces are governed by three phenomenological quantities: the coefficients of drag, lift, and moment, the latter determining the spin decay time constant. In past years, these quantities were studied mainly in wind tunnel experiments, whereby the forces on the baseball are measured directly. More recently, new tools have been developed that focus on measuring accurate baseball trajectories, from which the forces can be inferred. These tools include high-speed motion analysis, video tracking (the so-called PITCHf/x and HITf/x systems), and Doppler radar tracking via the TrackMan system. In this talk, I will discuss how these new tools work, what they are teaching us about baseball aerodynamics, and how they have the potential to revolutionize the analysis of the game itself.
  Footnotes: None
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CF02:

Making Sport of Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Invited - John E. Goff, Lynchburg College
434-544-8856, goff@lynchburg.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The sports world provides an unlimited number of introductory physics examples. I will use a few of those examples to illustrate how an introductory physics teacher (high school or college/university) can use sports to not only teach physics but to help motivate students. Students in need of a little push may find connections to sports a way to make physics more "real world" than traditional examples.
  Footnotes: None
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CF03:

The Physics of Kubb
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:30PM - 7:40PM
  Author: Erick P. Agrimson, St. Catherine University
651-690-8834, erickagrimson@stkate.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: If one defines a sport as an activity of diversion in which one engages in relaxation, Kubb or otherwise known as "Viking chess," is a sport to many Scandinavians. The physics behind this Viking game will be discussed such as forces involved, inertia of batons as well as a short synopsis of the game for the uninitiated.
  Footnotes: None
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CF04:

Student Projects with Video Analysis
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:40PM - 7:50PM
  Author: Aaron Titus, High Point University
336-841-4668, atitus@highpoint.edu
  Co-Author(s): Shawn Sloan, Luke Grome, Mary Funke, Nikki Sanford
  Abstract: Using video analysis software such as Tracker and inexpensive high-speed video cameras, students can do very interesting projects at the introductory level. In this presentation, I will demonstrate two projects completed by students in my introductory calculus-based physics class. (1) High-speed video analysis of a soccer ball kicked with backspin was used to measure the force and torque on the soccer ball by the foot. The force and torque were used to calculate how far off center the foot impacted the ball, i.e. the moment arm. (2) A mechanical device was used to model a hula hoop rotating around a person's arm. High-speed video analysis of a hula hoop rotating on the device showed that a point on the hoop travels in a spiral-like path. A graph of x-position vs. time for a point on the hoop was a sum of two sine curves of similar frequencies, similar to a beat pattern in acoustics.
  Footnotes: None
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CG:

Indigenous Astronomy
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:30PM
  Presider: Tom Foster,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CG01:

Ethnoastronomy: Exploring Native Astronomy on the Great Plains
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Invited - Mark Hollabaugh, Normandale Community College
651-261-4125, mark.hollabaugh@normandale.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Ethnoastronomy is the study of an indigenous people's astronomy. Through legends, winter counts, and second-hand reports, we know a great deal about astronomy on the Great Plains in the 19th century. This talk will explore how ethnoastronomers use many well-known tools of astronomy to understand phenomena, events, and beliefs of a native people. Focusing primarily on the Lakota people of the western Dakotas, examples will include eclipses, meteor showers, and the aurora borealis.
  Footnotes: None
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CG02:

Ways of Seeing: Native Perspectives in Astronomy
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Invited - Diana Wiig, University of Wyoming
307-977-5218, dwiig@uwyo.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: While attending a cultural festival at the Wind River Reservation, I brought my telescope to share with the students and their parents. During our night sky navigation, I began to hear murmured stories that were unfamiliar to me. I was intrigued; so began my journey into the rich oral/written narratives of Northern Arapaho and Shoshone cultures. This presentation will share some of the stories, resources, and websites to further enhance the astronomy experience from a native perspective.
  Footnotes: sponsored by Thomas Foster
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CH:

Science and Society
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 8:00PM
  Presider: Steve Shropshire,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CH01:

Do Physics Best-Sellers Sell Physics Short?
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 6:40PM
  Author: Craig C. Wiegert, University of Georgia
706-542-4023, wiegert@physast.uga.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: There are many examples of non-technical physics and astronomy books that top the charts on Amazon and make it to the New York Times best-seller list. The most popular books often explore mind-bending topics like string theory, general relativity, and cosmology. While these books certainly generate excitement and fascination with physics among the general public---and future students---their prominence has the unfortunate side effect of misrepresenting the discipline as a whole. I'll discuss the sometimes unrealistic perceptions that our beginning college physics majors have about areas of research in physics and astronomy, and what we're doing to modify those perceptions without (hopefully!) diminishing students' interest in the field.
  Footnotes: None
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CH02:

The Haunted Physics Lab at Creighton University
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:40PM - 6:50PM
  Author: Thomas H. Zepf, Creighton University
402-558-3125, thzepf@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: For over 25 years at Creighton University, "Dr. Zepf's Haunted Physics Lab" has been a popular outreach attraction for teaching basic principles of physics to students and the general public. Currently it is an annual Physics Club project at Creighton University during the Halloween season. In 2004 an article* about it in TPT generated wide interest. Today, applications of the haunted lab theme for teaching science are widespread both in this country and abroad. In this presentation one of the exhibits in Dr. Zepf's Haunted Physics Lab will be explained and a video of it that was made during an actual session will be shown. Watch as visitors are greeted by a seemingly bodiless "Department Head." It talks. It answers questions. It's alive!
  Footnotes: *Thomas H. Zepf, ?The Haunted Physics Lab,? Phys. Teach. 42, 404 (Oct. 2004).
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CH03:

Data from the Use of a Domestic Ground-Source Heatpump
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:50PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Tom Carter, College of DuPage
630-942-3346, cartert@cod.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: During last summer’s Physics and Society session, there was a discussion of the benefits of the use of ground source (a.k.a “geothermal”) heatpumps. In this talk, I will briefly review how a ground source heatpump works and present some historical energy data from the use of my own unit in northern Illinois. I will also point out some reasons why these units are not the best green technology for all situations.
  Footnotes: None
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CH04:

A Physics of Energy Course by Train, West Coast, USA
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:10PM
  Author: Katrina M. Hay, Pacific Lutheran University
253 538 5999, hay@plu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Peter B. Davis
  Abstract: Inspired by concern for sustainability and environmental impact of conventional fuel usage, an introductory interdisciplinary travel course was designed. The course provides students with an understanding of the underlying physical principles of traditional and alternative methods of energy production. The Western United States is an ideal region to study practical use and research of hydroelectric, wind, nuclear, solar, ocean wave, and geothermal energy. This course, taught for the first time in January 2011, traveled by Amtrak Coast Starlight train, making stops in Washington, Oregon, and California. Students became aware of their impact on global energy by experiencing first hand the physics connection between communities and energy. This presentation will include learning objectives, energy source locations, an interdisciplinary connection to geology, and discussion of the unique opportunity for faculty to connect with students in an off-campus environment.
  Footnotes: Blog created by the participants of the course: http://plu-west-coast-2011.blogspot.com/
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CH05:

Integrating Sustainability Across the Science Curriculum of Gustavus Adolphus College
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:10PM - 7:20PM
  Author: Charles F. Niederriter, Gustavus Adolphus College
(507)933-7315, Chuck@gustavus.edu
  Co-Author(s): Amanda Hochstatter, Hasanga Samaraweera
  Abstract: We live in an era when student interest in energy, sustainability, and the environment is increasing, as it becomes clear that our current production and consumption of energy negatively impacts the environment and raises a number of potentially significant challenges for the future. The primary goal of this CCLI project is to improve science education at Gustavus and other colleges across the country by taking advantage of this trend. Integrating sustainability across the science curriculum is an excellent way to educate students about this important area while teaching quantitative skills and increasing interest and enthusiasm for science. We will report on our first summer's work developing laboratory and classroom experiences and discuss plans for future work.
  Footnotes: None
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CH06:

Physics and the Sewing Machine
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:20PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Courtney W. Willis, University of Northern Colorado
351 2961, courtney.willis@unco.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Few products of the industrial revolution have had as much impact on modern society as the sewing machine. The sewing machine, sometimes referred to as the "Queen of Inventions," was the first home appliance but it also brought us the "American System" of manufacturing with interchangeable parts, ready to wear clothing, the modern department store, the time payment plan, and the sweat shop. Introduced in the mid 1800s, the scientifically inclined were kept informed of each new development in the pages of "The Scientific American," and by the turn of the 20th century high school physics curriculum was being developed utilizing the sewing machine. Since most schools had little scientific apparatus and the sewing machine was rather ubiquitous, many hands-on activities were designed around the sewing machine for use in physics classrooms.
  Footnotes: None
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CH07:

Gender Bias in Faculty Hiring and Promotion: A Research Proposal
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:30PM - 7:40PM
  Author: Ramon S. Barthelemy, Western Michigan University
231-578-7885, ramon.s.barthelemy@wmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Charles R. Henderson
  Abstract: According to the AIP, in 2006 only 10% of faculty at Physics PhD-granting institutions were female. One potential contributor to this underrepresentation of women is gender bias in the hiring and promotion process. This talk will discuss a study of such gender bias in the field of psychology* and present a proposal for a similar study in physics. In the psychology study, a curriculum vita from a faculty member at the beginning or tenure phase of their career was sent to randomly selected faculty. Participants were asked to rate the content of the CV along with their decision for hiring the individual or granting tenure. The CVs were identical except that some had a traditionally male name and others had a traditionally female name. The psychology results found significant gender bias in hiring. Feedback will be invited on the design of a similar study in physics.
  Footnotes: *Steinpreis R, Anders K, Ritzke D (1999) The impact of gender on the review of the CVs of job applicants and tenure candidates: A national empirical study. Sex Roles 41: 509?528.
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CH08:

A Project-based Curriculum in Energy Studies
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:40PM - 7:50PM
  Author: Theresa Edmonds
Creighton University Energy Studies Program
402-280-3039, mgc91339@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jay Leighter, Gina Merys, Michael Cherney
  Abstract: A new program in Energy Studies at Creighton University recently welcomed its first students. This STEM program addresses energy issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. The new bachelor of science curriculum develops applied scientists with communications skills, knowledge of public policy, law, and the human factors relevant for implementing their work. In addition to a strong emphasis on problem solving, the program seeks to instill life-long learning skills, augment team work talents, reward innovation, and enhance communication abilities. The project-based curriculum works to tailor the experience to the student. Students are asked to identify what they want from a particular learning experience and to establish expectations. Projects are formulated so that students are required to work on the areas where they need development. Projects are structured to involve active participation of the students. Students are expected periodically to reflect on their work and follow up appropriately. A BA program is also offered.
  Footnotes: This work is supported by the United States Department of Energy. Sponsored by Michael Cherney.
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CH09:

Education Outreach Efforts of the Acoustical Society of America
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:50PM - 8:00PM
  Author: Wendy K. Adams, Acoustical Society of America
970-539-6154, wendy.adams@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Acoustical Society of America has recently been focusing effort on K-12 (note: the HS material works well for intro college students) outreach through a partnership with the Optical Society of America and AAPT/PTRA (Physics Teaching Resource Agents). This year the acoustical society has created a website with activities for students and materials for teachers at http://exploresound.org. The material addresses the science of sound including physics, music, our ears, animal bioacoustics, architectural acoustics, underwater acoustics, speech and medical acoustics. We've also put together a poster series with guidebooks and are working on an activity kit that will be freely available to teachers. All materials are research based and tested with students. In this presentation we will show the type and breadth of material that's available and where to find it.
  Footnotes: None
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CI:

Methods to Improve Conceptual Learning in Quantum Mechanics II
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:40PM
  Presider: Mario Belloni,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CI01:

Operators and Measurements in Paradigms in Physics, Part 1
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 6:40PM
  Author: Corinne A. Manogue, Oregon State University
541-737-1695, corinne@physics.oregonstate.edu
  Co-Author(s): Elizabeth Gire, David McIntyre, Janet Tate, Dedra Demaree
  Abstract: Operators have a central role in the formalism of quantum mechanics. However, many students have trouble using operators in computations related to quantum measurements. Many students erroneously believe that, for operators representing observables, the linear transformation of the quantum state vector corresponds to the process of making a measurement on the system. The upper level quantum mechanics curriculum at Oregon State University takes a "spins first" approach that emphasizes quantum measurements. Within this curriculum, we have developed a variety of activities to help address this common student difficulty.
  Footnotes: None
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CI02:

Operators and Measurements in Paradigms in Physics, Part 2
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:40PM - 6:50PM
  Author: Elizabeth A. Gire, University of Memphis
901-678-1668, egire@memphis.edu
  Co-Author(s): Corinne A. Manogue, David McIntyre, Janet Tate, Dedra Demaree
  Abstract: The Paradigms team at Oregon State University has developed a series of activities that emphasize quantum measurements. Some of these activities specifically target students' conceptual understanding of the role of operators in computations related to measurements. We will discuss evidence of how these activities help students develop productive conceptual understandings of operators. This evidence is gathered from classroom video of students working through the activities in small group, whole class discussions, and clinical interviews, as well as students' homework and exams.
  Footnotes: None
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CI03:

A Hands-On Introduction to Quantum Mechanics for Sophomores
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:50PM - 7:00PM
  Author: David P. Jackson, Dickinson College
717-245-1073, jacksond@dickinson.edu
  Co-Author(s): Brett J. Pearson
  Abstract: The Physics Department at Dickinson College has re-designed its curriculum for physics majors to take advantage of recently developed single-photon experiments in quantum mechanics.* The ultimate goal is to bring students face to face with some of the fascinating and subtle features of quantum mechanics in a hands-on setting. This is mainly accomplished in a sophomore-level course titled "Introduction to Relativistic and Quantum Physics." Experiments include the behavior of a photon at a beam splitter--it "must" go one way or the other--and the behavior of a photon at a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer--it "must" go both ways. This talk will describe our curriculum changes and discuss some of the successes and difficulties we have experienced.
  Footnotes: *This work was supported by NSF grant DUE-0737230.
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CI04:

Illustrating Quantum Non-Locality with the Two-Slit Interferometer
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:10PM
  Author: Scott C. Johnson, Intel
503-613-3862, scott.c.johnson@intel.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The classic demonstration of interference is the two-slit interferometer, so students are generally comfortable with this system and the calculations that go with it. This familiarity makes it a good system for illustrating new concepts, such as the non-local correlations seen in quantum entanglement. These can be illustrated with a modified interferometer that uses two sets of slits, one on each side of a source of momentum-entangled photons. (This actual system has not yet been realized, but a similar Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been constructed.) This system shows interference-like correlations between photons detected on opposite sides of the source, which can be very far away from each other. These correlations change with the spacing of both sets of slits, illustrating Einstein’s “spooky action at a distance.”
  Footnotes: None
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CI05:

A New Multimedia Resource for Teaching Quantum Mechanics Concepts
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:10PM - 7:20PM
  Author: Antje Kohnle, University of St Andrews
0044 1334 463195, ak81@st-andrews.ac.uk
  Co-Author(s): Donatella Cassettari, Tom Edwards, Callum Ferguson, Alastair Gillies
  Abstract: Since 2009, we have been developing and evaluating visualizations and animations for the teaching of quantum mechanics concepts [Kohnle et al., Eur J Phys, 31 6 (2010) 1441]. This new resource builds on existing education research as well as our lecturing experience, and aims to specifically target student misconceptions and areas of difficulty in quantum mechanics. Each animation includes a step-by-step exploration that explains key points in detail. Animations and instructor resources are freely available at www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~qmanim, and can be played or downloaded from this site. Animations have been used and evaluated in several quantum mechanics courses. Recent work includes extending the range of topics and levels of the animations, and a study of students' interactions with a previously unseen animation, aiming to test whether interface and content make sense, and whether the animations encourage interaction and exploration. Results of this work will be used to optimize the animations.
  Footnotes: Further authors: Christopher Hooley, Natalia Korolkova, Joseph Llama and Bruce Sinclair, University of St Andrews
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CI06:

Assessment of Student Understanding in Modern Physics
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:20PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Jessica L. Uscinski, American University
202-885-3505, uscinski@american.edu
  Co-Author(s): Teresa L. Larkin
  Abstract: A number of tools are widely available to assess student understanding of key concepts in introductory physics, but less so for modern physics and quantum mechanics. The Modern Physics course at American University presents an ideal opportunity for conceptual assessment given its somewhat atypical student composition. In this study, student understanding of the photoelectric effect is probed using a variety of measures. A quantitative assessment was first performed using the Quantum Physics Conceptual Survey (QPCS)*. A series of both qualitative and quantitative exam questions were then developed and given as additional assessment measures of the photoelectric effect. In this presentation we summarize the pre-/post-gains of the assessments and correlate them with academic background and performance. The preliminary results from these assessment methods will be discussed in the larger context of how assessment measures can be maximized to enhance student understanding in a modern physics course.
  Footnotes: *Wuttiprom, S., Sharma, M. D., Johnston, I. D., Chitaree, R., & Soankwan, C. (2009). Development and use of a conceptual survey in introductory quantum physics. International Journal of Science Education, 31(5), 631-654.
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CI07:

Educational Proposal for Teaching QED
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:30PM - 7:40PM
  Author: George E. Kontokostas
UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS, PEDAGOGICAL DEPARTMENT
00302109846897, gakon67@hotmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The session will focus on mentoring and induction programs for new physics teachers. Students need and desire to know the latest scientific knowledge. Quantum is introduced in order to give students an understandable qualitative view of the origin of Feynman diagrams as representations of particle interactions. Elementary diagrams are combined in a simple way in order to understand the standard Model. In this presentation we examine how an alternative way of teaching can help students to design, predict interactions, and understand how the diagrams work. Using special pedagogical methods and with the help of technology, we note that most students were able to design the three interactions and to predict the formation of some particles. Without using much math, the students were allowed to develop an understanding of QED. Some misconceptions were dealt with successfully.
  Footnotes: http://accelaratingeducation.blogspot.com http://micro-kosmos.uoa.gr/
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CJ:

Potpourri of Teacher Preparation Programs II
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:30PM
  Presider: Taha Mzoughi,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CJ01:

Science Teachers Acquired through New Directions in New Mexico (STAND-NM)
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 6:40PM
  Author: Jennifer J. Neakrase, New Mexico State University
575-646-7637, neakrase@nmsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Traditionally the certification of physics teachers at New Mexico State University has been part of the secondary education program in the College of Education. Students select a specific science discipline (e.g., physics) as part of a general science certification, in which they declare secondary education as their undergraduate major or receive their license through a Master of Arts program as graduate students. As part of the traditional program, students take a limited number of discipline specific courses. Previously there was no option for science majors to receive a secondary science teaching license without switching majors away from their science discipline or entering the Masters program. STAND-NM, an NSF Noyce-funded program, provides a new option for science majors to pursue secondary science licensure while finishing their undergraduate degree within their science major. This talk introduces the program at NMSU and discusses difficulties in recruitment, especially with our physics majors.
  Footnotes: Funding provided through an NSF Robert Noyce Scholarship grant DUE-0934919.
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CJ02:

Florida PROMiSE: The Perspective of Three Physics Faculty Participants*
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:40PM - 6:50PM
  Author: Mark W. Meisel, University of Florida and NHMFL
352-392-8867, meisel@phys.ufl.edu
  Co-Author(s): Selman Hershfield, James S Brooks
  Abstract: Florida PROMiSE (http://www.flpromise.org/) has a mission "to improve Florida student achievement in mathematics and science through professional development for Florida's Educators and to build capacity to sustain quality implementation of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS)." We participated in the design and inaugural deliveries (Summer 2009) of two institutes: Matter and Energy for K-8 teachers and Force and Motion for 6-12 teachers. With our continued participation, these institutes were revised and held again in summer 2010. This brief presentation serves to increase awareness of PROMiSE and to provide an overview of our participation, especially as it relates to "increasing the content knowledge of the participants." One outcome is our increased awareness of the "misconceptions" that K-12 students and teachers possess, and the role that a faculty member plays in reversing these misconceptions.
  Footnotes: *Supported, in part, by NSF DMR-0701400 (MWM), NSF DMR-0654118 (NHMFL), and the State of Florida.
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CJ03:

A First Attempt at a Physics Methods Course
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:50PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Michael R. Meyer, Michigan Technological University
906-487-2273, mrmeyer@mtu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: High school physics teachers have historically been certified at Michigan Technological University with only a general “teaching science” methods course in their education curriculum. In the spring semester of 2011 I piloted the first physics teaching methods course specifically designed to give pre-certification teachers exposure to and practice in PER-supported pedagogies. This presentation will review the curriculum and results of the new course, discuss lessons learned and take a quick look toward the future.
  Footnotes: None
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CJ04:

Helping Middle and High School Teachers' Students Do Inquiry
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:10PM
  Author: Gordon J. Aubrecht, Ohio State University Marion
7407256250, aubrecht.1@osu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: An Ohio Department of Education-supported project has concluded three years of funding, with a fourth pending. Student scores on the Ohio Achievement Test have climbed from the original poor level to a higher poor level in a district with about 80% of students receiving free or reduced-cost breakfast and lunch. Teachers want to continue to change. Details of the project will be presented.
  Footnotes: None
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CJ05:

Core Knowledge Movement Inspired Teachers Preparation in Middle School Physics
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:10PM - 7:20PM
  Author: Ana Rita L. Mota
CFP e Departamento de Física e Astronomia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto
00351963157970, anaritalopesmota@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): J M.B. Lopes dos Santos
  Abstract: We present a study involving physics teaching in Portuguese schools (seventh and eighth grades) inspired by the Core Knowledge movement (CKM), which defends the need for common curricula, well-defined teaching objectives and carefully planned classes. The project combined this approach with teacher training and weekly lab work, and required careful preparation of teaching materials (lesson plans and proposals for experimental activities), which were an outcome of the project. It was assessed with an analysis of the results of two groups; the experimental group under this instruction (CKM) and the control one, where the classes were taught the traditional Portuguese way. Data sources included analysis of the students' pre- and post-tests and interviews with the teachers involved. We found that the CKM instruction, inserted in an interactive and well-designed teaching environment, was more effective in promoting conceptual change and scientific understandings than the instruction in a traditional course.
  Footnotes: Sponsor: Carlos Manuel C. Guimaraes Carvalho Member ID: 41156
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CJ06:

Attracting Undergraduate Physics Majors into Becoming High School Physics Teachers
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:20PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Michael W. Prim
UNC-Chapel Hill Astronomy and Physics Department
919-419-2496, mwprim@earthlink.net
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: How do universities and colleges attract undergraduate physics majors into becoming high school physics teachers? It has been my task at UNC-Chapel Hill to talk to the physics majors and present the reasons why teaching high school physics can lead to a satisfying career as well as making a major social contribution to the planet. Few careers offer the enormous influence and satisfaction as does teaching high school physics. Many people look back on their life and wonder what they have given to the planet. An effective physics teacher can influence the manner in which a person thinks and lives their life. Now is the time to create a new breed of extraordinary high school physics teachers.
  Footnotes: None
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Crkrbrl01:

  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 11:30AM - 12:30PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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PA:

Reaching out to the Public: A Necessary Dialogue
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 10:30AM - 11:30AM
  Presider: Jill Mashall,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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PA01:

Reaching Out to the Public: A Necessary Dialogue
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 10:30AM - 11:30AM
  Author: Plenary - James H. Stith
Vice President Emeritus, American Institute of Physics
301-390-5914, jstith@aip.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: What are the roles and responsibilities of scientists to reach out and establish a dialogue with the public? Why is it important for scientists to do this? This talk will also describe various American Institute of Physics (AIP) media efforts including the Discoveries and Breakthroughs Inside Science TV (DBIS) program. DBIS is a peer-reviewed, syndicate science news service that distributes twelve 90-second news segments to local television stations. Each month, DBIS can be seen by more than 52 million people in the USA and over 200 million people internationally. DBIS was supported by the National Science Foundation (2003-2007) and currently has financial support from a broad coalition of scientific societies.
  Footnotes: None
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PB:

APS Division of Condensed Matter Physics Session: Frontiers in Nanoscience
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 3:30PM - 5:00PM
  Presider: Dick Peterson,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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PB01:

A Perspective on the Future of Nanotechnology
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 3:30PM - 4:15PM
  Author: Plenary - Barbara Jones, IBM’s Almaden Research Center
408-927-2494, bajones@almaden.ibm.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: I will give an overview of the state of nanotechnology, beginning with some current challenges, and including the promise it holds for the future, in particular for the IT industry. From carbon nanotubes to molecular electronics, spintronics to quantum computing, there are many promising avenues for new memory and devices, and I will show how these interesting systems all employ nanometer-scale, and even atomic-scale, critical features. I will give a specific example of my own nanoscience research, describing some surprises in the behavior of atomic-scale engineered spin chains. Finally, I will discuss some fundamental challenges that remain, and conclude with some open questions for the future of the IT industry and the important role that science can play.
  Footnotes: None
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PB02:

Etch-a-Sketch Nanoelectronics
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 4:15PM - 5:00PM
  Author: Plenary - Jeremy Levy,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The popular children's toy Etch-a-Sketch has motivated the invention of a new method for creating electronic circuits that are so small, they approach the spacing between atoms. The interface between two normally insulating materials, strontium titanate and lanthanum aluminate, can be switched between the insulating and conducting state with the use of the sharp metallic probe of an atomic-force microscope. By "sketching" this probe in various patterns, one can create electronic structures with remarkably diverse properties. This new nanoelectronics platform may lead to new ultra high- density information storage and processing and sensing applications, create new types of particles (called Majorana fermions), and meet the challenge of quantum computation.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1:

  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 9:30PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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PST1A01:

A Novel Way to Measure the Distance to an Asteroid
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Richard D. Dietz, University of Northern Colorado
9703512950, rdietz@unco.edu
  Co-Author(s): Maurice I. Woods, James P McDonald, Hunter P Nolen, Travis W Riggle
  Abstract: We have successfully measured the distance between the Earth and a main belt asteroid, 298 Baptistina. We used remotely operated telescopes in New Mexico and Spain to take simultaneous images of the asteroid. The position of the asteroid with respect to the background stars was slightly different in the two images, and application of the method of parallax to the images enabled an accurate determination of the distance to the asteroid.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1A02:

Robotic Telescope Observations and Active Learning Exercises in Introductory Astronomy
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Gintaras Duda, Creighton University
402-280-5730, gkduda@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jack Gabel
  Abstract: This poster will describe the current and future implementation of an NSF CCLI grant at Creighton University to rebuild and re-imagine the introductory astronomy curriculum. Traditional introductory lectures will be transformed through the addition of RF clickers and other innovations such as tutorial-style active learning exercises. The capstone to the project will be the purchase, installation, and operation of a robotic telescope capable of remote observations that will be made available to students and faculty at local and regional institutions as well as middle and secondary students in the region. This addition will greatly enhance Creighton astronomy lab courses, bringing a hands-on science experience to our curriculum that is currently lacking. The robotic telescope will allow the implementation of project-based learning with emphasis on advanced observational astronomy techniques and instrumentation including imagery, photometry, and spectral analysis at the introductory and advanced levels.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1A03:

Deliberately Building Spectroscopy into the Intro Astronomy Course
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Richard Gelderman, Western Kentucky University
270 745 6203, gelderman@wku.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We present and discuss a series of "minds-on" interactive student-centered exercises and activities built into an introductory astronomy course. The lessons are structured to help students improve their ability to recognize patterns and improve their ability to really see the details in front of them. Another goal is for students to realize there is "more than meets the eye" to learn how to discover "hidden" diagnostics, such as different sources of light their eyes see as white light. A curriculum that emphasizes spectroscopy also provides the opportunity to stress the story of the "Harvard Women," a tale that bridges gender gaps and often humanizes scientists in the eyes of non-science majors. Finally, with a solid foundation in spectroscopy, students are better prepared to understand exciting topics such as Hubble's law and the importance of primordial nucleosynthesis.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1A04:

Automating Small Observatory Domes
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Brian K. Hubbard, University of West Georgia
678 839-4095, bhubbar1@my.westga.edu
  Co-Author(s): Robert Moore, Jr., Bob Powell
  Abstract: Many small observatories have computerized telescopes housed in manually operated domes. As the telescope automatically slews to another part of the sky, the operator must activate a motor to move the shutter of the dome to allow the light from the target object to enter the telescope. Retrofitting an observatory dome for automated tracking, the direction the telescope is pointed is likely to be too expensive for a smaller institution. Using an Arduin microcontroller, a compass module, and Xbee wireless communications, we were able to track an independently operated telescope without the use of bulky and expensive rotary encoders. This demonstration is a low-cost solution of consumer microcontrollers and accessories and is a viable wireless solution to observatory dome automation.
  Footnotes: Brian Hubbard is an undergraduate student at UWG. I, Bob Powell, am a member of AAPT and will be his sponsor. bpowell@westga.edu
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PST1A05:

Effectiveness of Two Interactive Learning Techniques in Introductory Astronomy
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Jessica C. Lair, Eastern Kentucky University
859-622-4375, jessica.lair@eku.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jing Wang
  Abstract: As a part of the shift to active learning environments in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Eastern Kentucky University, we have implemented the use of a clicker system in all the introductory astronomy courses. The clickers were used in class on a daily basis to allow the students to actively participate in the lectures. We present pre- and post-test data from the solar system astronomy class utilizing the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT) from the first semester of clicker use compared to previous semesters. We also present the differences in the ADT results between the laboratory and non-laboratory sections of the introductory astronomy course.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Dr. Jing Wang at Eastern Kentucky University.
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PST1A06:

Stellar Bar Codes
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Doug Lombardi, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
702-513-4415, lombar37@unlv.nevada.edu
  Co-Author(s): Donna Young, Pamela Perry
  Abstract: Astronomers classify stars based on the major components of their spectra. Much like bar-codes on store items, stellar spectra are each slightly different. The study of spectra provides scientists with important information about stars that is otherwise inaccessible, including composition, temperature, mass, luminosity, age, and evolutionary history. Spectroscopy is the study of starlight -- which is analyzed and plotted by intensity versus wavelength -- and visually represented as spectra. The stellar classification system of O,B,A,F,G,K,M is based upon spectral analysis. Spectra also determine the position of an object on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram; each location on the diagram has a unique combination of magnitude and temperature, which gives information about the evolutionary stage of the star. This poster discusses an activity that uses real stellar spectra to help students learn about star properties and characteristics.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1A07:

A 'Make and Take' Overnight Workshop at the SLL Observatory
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Steven J. Maier, Northwestern Oklahoma State University
580 327 8562, sjmaier@nwosu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Bobette Doerrie
  Abstract: In the summer of 2011, an overnight astronomy workshop was held at the Selman Living Laboratory (SLL) Observatory [1]. In operation since 2000, the SLL Observatory regularly hosts summer programs for public groups, led by NWOSU faculty and members of a local astronomy club, SAS [2]. Located in northwest Oklahoma, many state park tourists and wildlife and nature conservation enthusiasts frequent the facility. For our summer 2011 program, several Oklahoma science teachers were invited to take advantage of our facility's dark skies, 12" Meade and 10" Dobsonian telescopes. Participants also took away numerous free instructional materials purchased through funding provided by the AAPT Bauder Fund grant program [3]. This poster will present some of the highlights of the workshop and summarize our efforts in making astronomy more accessible to teachers in a region where astronomy is very rarely included as part of regular HS/MS science curricula.
  Footnotes: [1] www.nwosu.edu/sll-observatory [2] www.starcreek.org [3] www.aapt.org/Programs/grants/bauderfund.cfm
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PST1A08:

Service Learning in Introductory Astronomy at Misericordia University
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Michael P. Orleski, Misericordia University
570-674-6251, morleski@misericordia.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Misericordia University's Introduction to Astronomy course during the fall 2010 semester incorporated a service learning component. The students in a service learning course use course content in a service project. They then reflect on the service and how it affected their learning. The astronomy students held observations for two groups of local elementary school students. This poster provides details on service learning, the observation sessions, and a summary of comments made by the astronomy students regarding the service learning experience.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1B01:

What Does the Fukushima Disaster Mean for Nuclear Energy?
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Gordon J. Aubrecht, Ohio State University Marion
7407256250, aubrecht.1@osu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The 9.0 earthquake, tsunami and its consequences will influence global acceptance of nuclear energy. We examine some of these.
  Footnotes: If possible, in Energy and Environment session as well as the poster session.
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PST1B02:

A Scientific Duty: Letters to the Editor
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Gordon J. Aubrecht, Ohio State University Marion
7407256250, aubrecht.1@osu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The author believes that letters to the editor of his local paper trying to explain what science is and how scientists work in response to letters demonstrating ignorance of those characteristics is a duty of all working scientists in view of the anti-scientific tidal wave sweeping America.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1B03:

Education Outreach Efforts of the Acoustical Society of America
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Wendy K. Adams, Acoustical Society of America
970-539-6154, wendy.adams@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Acoustical Society of America has recently been focusing effort on K-12 (note: the HS material works well for intro college students) outreach through a partnership with the Optical Society of America and AAPT/PTRAs (Physics Teaching Resource Agents). This year the acoustical society has created a website with activities for students and materials for teachers at http://exploresound.org. The material addresses the science of sound including physics, music, our ears, animal bioacoustics, architectural acoustics, underwater acoustics, speech and medical acoustics. We've also put together a poster series with guidebooks and are working on an activity kit that will be freely available to teachers. All materials are research based and tested with students. In this poster we will describe the type and breadth of material that's available and where to find it.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1B04:

Teaching and Intuitive Learning of Electronics Based Upon Projects
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Isabel Cárdenas, Grupo de Física / Gimnasio La Montaña
6761861, grupofisica@glm.edu.co
  Co-Author(s): Alejandra Corzo, Mauricio Mendivelso-Villaquirán
  Abstract: Based on intuitive learning of electronics and programming, with minimum teacher intervention, two 12-year-old girls can develop two physics lab interfases using open source hardware and software: distance ultrasound monitor and water level monitor. Issues about cognitive processes, building processes and teacher intervention are detailed.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1B05:

Cosmic Math Teacher Workshop
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Judy Vondruska, South Dakota State University
605-688-5859, Judy.Vondruska@sdstate.edu
  Co-Author(s): Larry Browning, Christine Larson
  Abstract: Cosmic Math is a curriculum project designed to use astronomy as a means of motivating students in learning geometry, algebra, trigonometry, Earth and physical science concepts in middle school and high school. The project begins with a week-long summer workshop on the campus of SDSU and continues with follow-up sessions during the fall and spring semesters. During the week's summer workshop, teams of teachers are involved in inquiry-based activities focused on building models (space and shape concepts), collecting and analyzing data (manipulation of quantities), and sharing ideas for implementation of activities into the classroom. The workshop is offered to physical science and mathematics teachers at both the middle and high school level with the intent of building local partnerships in teaching math skills. Teachers are encouraged to develop projects that cross between their classrooms so that students see the connections between science and math in each class.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1B06:

Math and Science Summer Institute for at Risk Students
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - James D. Dull, College of Idaho
208-861-5682, jdull@collegeofidaho.edu
  Co-Author(s): Robin A. Cruz, Melissa Ferro, Monica White, Kathryn Devine
  Abstract: The College of Idaho has collaborated with Syringa Middle School in Caldwell, Idaho, to promote the study of math and science in a population at high risk for dropping out of high school. Participants include the economically disadvantaged, rurally isolated, and traditionally under-represented students. The goal of the program is to engage these students with the potential for academic success by exposure to enrichment activities in science, engineering, and mathematics. Moreover, our program encourages these students to consider the importance of math and science in high school and promotes college as both a desirable and attainable goal through the participation of college student assistant role models.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1B07:

Opening up the Department: Day Camps and Workshops
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Timothy T. Grove
Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne
260-481-6157, grovet@ipfw.edu
  Co-Author(s): Mark F. Masters
  Abstract: We present information regarding two LaserFest events that happened at our home university (IPFW). Over the past two summers (2010 and 2011) we have had a day camp for high school age students and in 2010 we had a workshop for high school teachers. The day camps had several purposes: to teach about lasers as well as providing "fun" activities featuring lasers. The workshop was designed to have the teachers learn more about lasers and light so that they can incorporate them into their classes. We will present information regarding the activities we developed.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1B08:

Physics Outreach in Canada: A University-Industry-Government Collaboration
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Marina Milner-Bolotin
The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
1-604-822-4234, marina.milner-bolotin@ubc.ca
  Co-Author(s): Adriana Predoi-Cross, Li-Hong Xu, Shohini Ghose, Roby Austin
  Abstract: In Canada, education is part of a Provincial Mandate, thus every province has its own curricula in every school subject. All across the country, physical science is included as an important part of K-12 curricula. However, for the most part, elementary school teachers have very limited physical science knowledge. They are generalists and most of them have not taken physics beyond grade 11 and very few took introductory physics in college. This is especially troubling, since most of the students decide on their most and least favorite subjects in upper elementary school (grades 4-6). To combat this problem, the government, industry, and universities and colleges all across Canada have established a country-wide physics outreach effort. The poster will describe Canadian physics outreach activities in K-16 classrooms and their effectiveness.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1B09:

Conceptual vs. Numeric Problem Performance on the NY Regents Physics Exam
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Luanna S. Gomez, SUNY Buffalo State College Physics
716 878 5639, gomezls@buffalostate.edu
  Co-Author(s): Dan L. MacIsaac, Kathleen A Falconer, Joe L Zawicki
  Abstract: We review and discuss student performance (1000 < N < 3000) on selected items from the NYS Regents Physics standardized physics examinations offerings in the past five years. Student difficulty on conceptual items, traditional problem-solving exercises, and more challenging non-traditional problems are analyzed and compared.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C01:

Recruitment of High School STEM Teachers through the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program at Buffalo State College
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Luanna Gomez, Buffalo State College
716-878-5639, gomezls@buffalostate.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jane Cushman, Catherine Lange, Daniel MacIsaac, David Wilson
  Abstract: In January 2011, the National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Scholarship Program awarded up to $750,000 to the NSF-Noyce New Math and Science Teacher Partnership of Western New York at SUNY-Buffalo State College. The partnership builds on existing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) teacher preparation programs designed to address the shortage of math and physics teachers in New York's high needs schools by increasing the number of pre K-12 STEM teachers who are both certified and well-qualified. Noyce scholarships have been used to recruit and foster the development of new STEM teacher candidates through a variety of paths of entry into teaching. In return for receiving financial support, participants are committed to teach for two years in high needs districts for each year of scholarship support.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C02:

Creating a Conceptual Understanding of the Wave Nature of Light
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Andrew D. Boggs, Eastern Kentucky University
859-248-6486, andrew_boggs4@mymai.eku.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jing Wang
  Abstract: The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Eastern Kentucky University offers an inquiry physics course for middle and elementary pre-service teachers. This course uses procedures produced by Lillian C. McDermott and the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, specifically the textbook Physics by Inquiry. Over the past decade, we have found it is particularly helpful to address some common misconceptions students hold at this level. We have adapted several units to fit the requirements of the Kentucky Core Content. One requirement at the middle school level is student understanding of the wave nature of light, which is not addressed by McDermott's textbook. Using techniques parallel to McDermott and her group's work we developed an inquiry unit for introducing this topic to pre-service teachers. In this unit, we are using affordable items to provide tools for future educators to present this material to their students.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C03:

Examining High School Physics Teachers' Use of Resources
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Matthew E. Hanselman, University of Northern Iowa
319-273-2420, bighans@uni.edu
  Co-Author(s): Lawrence T. Escalada, Jeffrey T Morgan, Emily M Stumpff
  Abstract: The Iowa Physics Teacher Instruction and Resource (IPTIR) program is a three-year professional development program offered at the University of Northern Iowa. IPTIR's aim is to introduce physics teachers to a research-based inquiry style of teaching. In addition, teachers may use program credit to work toward a physics teaching endorsement. Two curriculum packages, Physics Resources and Instructional Strategies for Motivating Students (PRISMS) Plus (1) and Modeling Instruction (2), are used to teach both content and pedagogy. Participants are also given the opportunity to borrow computers and laboratory equipment, and are provided with additional resources that they can use to complement their teaching or to help analyze different aspects of student performance. We discuss the provided resources and the extent to which program participants utilized each and viewed its effectiveness.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Lawrence Escalada and Jeffrey Morgan 1. http://www.uni.edu/prisms/ 2. http://modeling.asu.edu/
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PST1C04:

Using the RTOP to Gauge Implementation of IPTIR Program Goals
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Jeremy B. Hulshizer, University of Northern Iowa
319-273-2420, jeremy.hulshizer@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Lawrence T. Escalada, Jeffrey T Morgan
  Abstract: The Iowa Physics Teacher Instruction and Resources (IPTIR) program at the University of Northern Iowa trains physics teachers in research-based inquiry strategies; many out-of-field teachers also use the program to gain certification to teach physics. As part of their program activities, participants submit two video lessons each academic year, which the staff use to evaluate the degree to which participants are employing methods emphasized by the program. The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (1) is used to rate each submission. We discuss trends observed in examining the RTOP scores of program participants, as well as correlations between RTOP scores and student performance on various standardized conceptual assessments and other measures. 1. 1. Sawada, Daiwo, et al. "Measuring Reform Practices in Science and Mathematics Classrooms: The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol," School Science and Mathematics 102(6), pp. 245-253.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Lawrence Escalada and Jeffrey Morgan.
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PST1C05:

Content, Process, Affect, and Physics Courses for Future Teachers
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Paul Hutchison, Grinnell College
(641) 269-4882, hutchiso@grinnell.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: A physics class must have some physics knowledge in it. This self-evident statement hides complexity worth examining. It is important to think about the role of physics knowledge and the role of students in relation to it. This study explores how different knowledge-student relationships interact with the multiple goals in physics courses aimed at pre-service elementary teachers, though the findings bear on any course for future teachers. I draw on analyses of existing curricula, scholarship from the science education and teacher education research communities, and data collected when I taught such courses. My study indicates different relationships between students and physics knowledge can create classroom environments that prize some goals over others. It's not clear this must necessarily be a zero-sum game, where the most important goal is identified and supported. I speculate how a physics course for teachers might be organized to simultaneously support multiple instructional goals.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C06:

Science Education in Road Safety Education
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Marisa Michelini
Research Unit in Physics Education, University of Udine, Italy
0432558208, marisa.michelini@uniud.it
  Co-Author(s): Alessandra Mossenta, Alberto Stefanel, Laura Tamburini
  Abstract: Physics in context fulfills the training and motivation task for a basic science education as a citizenship right. We therefore faced the challenge of designing curriculum materials for primary and junior high school teachers for an action-research project aimed at road safety education. Starting from motion and relative motions, with a conceptual grounding of the role of the frame of reference, trajectory and kinematics vectors, in a bi- and tri-dimensional space of the real environment, and its two-dimensional representation on a road map, we proposed an analysis of the safety distance, based on human reaction time and dynamic parameters of the motion on the road, such as momentum and sliding and rolling friction. Cameras and motion sensors, tape timer and paper and pencil games or trials on the track accompanied the planning of teachers, who through microsteps of experimentation proposed a more detailed analysis of the physics of collisions and the involved energy, of the rigid body motion and of the conservation of angular momentum. We proposed the curriculum and the teacher training model as an example of educational innovation development based on inquiry learning regarding physics in context, made possible by institutional collaboration.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C07:

Investigative Science Learning Environment in the Pre-Service Teacher Science Classroom
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Eric N. Rowley, Wright State University
859 462 4747, fizx_teacher@mac.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Changes to the physics instruction for our pre-service middle level science teachers began in fall 2010. The core of these changes has been the Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE). This initial implementation of an ISLE-based curriculum provided an opportunity for qualitative investigation. Students were asked a complex question requiring multiple representations and higher order thinking on their end of the quarter exam. Approximately 75 student responses were analyzed for qualitative patterns. This poster will discuss the course, the question with student responses, and implications for further refinement of the use of ISLE in the pre-service teacher physics content courses.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C08:

2011 New Faculty Conference for Two-Year Colleges Physics Instructors
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Scott F. Schultz, Delta College
989-686-9452, sfschult@delta.edu
  Co-Author(s): Todd Leif
  Abstract: In March of 2011 Butler Community College hosted the New Faculty Conference for Two-Year College Physics Instructors. Twenty-nine new physics instructors attended the four day conference. This poster will present data on the the demographics of the participants, the content covered and the evaluation of conference.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C09:

Streamline to Mastery Teacher-Driven Professional Development
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Samson Sherman, Univ of Colorado - Boulder
720-261-3215, samson.sherman@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Shelly Belleau, Susie Nicholson-Dykstra, Sara Severance, Emily Quinty
  Abstract: Streamline to Mastery is an NSF-funded learner-centered professional development program that seeks to capitalize on teachers' knowledge and experience to move newer physics teachers toward mastery. In this model, teacher participants choose their own goals and areas of growth and conduct research into their own teaching practices. Classroom research is conducted in close collaboration with pre-service teacher undergraduates, graduate researchers, and university faculty in a collaborative effort that benefits all partners in the pursuit of more effective and equitable K-12 physics education. Teachers will share their research findings, describe efforts to recruit and design professional development experiences for the next cohort of Streamline to Mastery teachers, and describe plans to scale this highly effective model of physics teacher education beyond the current funding structure.
  Footnotes: This research is partially funded by NSF grant #DUE 934921 and sponsored by Valerie Otero, University of Colorado, Boulder.
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PST1C10:

Connecting Three Pivotal Concepts in K-12 Science State Standards and Maps of Conceptual Growth to Research in Physics Education
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh
412-624-9045, clsingh@pitt.edu
  Co-Author(s): Christian Schunn
  Abstract: We discuss three conceptual areas in physics that are particularly important targets for educational interventions in K-12 science. These conceptual areas are force and motion, conservation of energy, and geometrical optics, which were prominent in the U.S. national and four state standards that we examined. The four state standards that were analyzed to explore the extent to which the K-12 science standards differ in different states were selected to include states in different geographic regions and of different sizes. The three conceptual areas that were common to all the four state standards are conceptual building blocks for other science concepts covered in the K-12 curriculum. We discuss the nature of difficulties in these areas along with pointers toward approaches that have met with some success in each conceptual area.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C11:

Comparing Conceptual Understanding of Physics Teachers and Students
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Emily M. Stumpff, University of Northern Iowa
319-273-2420, stumpffe@uni.edu
  Co-Author(s): Lawerence T. Escalada, Jeffrey T Morgan, Matthew E Hanselman
  Abstract: The University of Northern Iowa's IPTIR (Iowa Physics Teacher Instruction and Resources) program introduces high school physics teachers, most of whom are out-of-field, to inquiry-based approaches to physics teaching. Numerous activities help develop participants' skills and track their progress in learning the content and the pedagogy emphasized in this program. All participants and their students complete various conceptual exams as pre-tests and post-tests. Three tests common to both populations are the Force Concept Inventory (1), the Test of Understanding Graphs - Kinematics (2), and the Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (3). Because instructors as well as their students take these exams, we can compare the raw scores and gains of the instructor during summer workshops and the raw scores and gains of their pupils during the academic year. We present the relationships between the knowledge of the teacher, as measured by these tests, and the learning gains of their students.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Lawerence Escalada and Jeffrey Morgan. 1. Hestenes, David, Wells, Malcolm, and Swackhammer, Gregg, ?Force concept inventory,? The Physics Teacher, 30(3), pp. 141-158. 2. Beichner, Robert J., ?Testing student interpretation of kinematics graphs,? American Journal of Physics, 62(8), pp. 750-762. 3. Lawson, Anton E., ?The development and validation of a classroom test of formal reasoning,? Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 15(1), pp. 11-24.
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PST1C12:

From Learning Assistant to Physics Teacher: Perspectives from Minority Students
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Leanne M. Wells, Florida International University
305-348-9305, lwells@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): David Jones
  Abstract: Florida International University confers more bachelor and master degrees on Hispanic students than any other university in the country. It is also the main source of high school teachers for the country's fourth and sixth largest school districts. For the first time in a decade, FIU will graduate physics teachers who have discipline-specific pedagogical training and field experiences. We explore the impact of FIU's Learning Assistant (LA) program, transformation of the science education program, Introductory Physics course reform, and Teacher-in-Residence presence on student views on studying science, attitudes toward teaching and learning, and the evolution of career choices. This presentation will focus on: (1) what LAs from underrepresented groups bring to the table when studying physics and start to think about teaching as a career and (2) how these students view and use the programs and support structures as they pass through the program and as they begin teaching.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1C13:

The Characteristics of a Thriving Secondary Physics Teacher Education Program
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Courtney W. Willis, University of Northern Colorado
351 2961, courtney.willis@unco.edu
  Co-Author(s): Cynthia Galovich, Matthew R Semak, Richard D Dietz
  Abstract: The physics department of the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) typically graduates two to four secondary physics teachers each year. Since 2005 the UNC physics department has graduated 16 physics majors who have become teachers, and at present we have eight additional undergraduates who are planning on secondary teaching as a career. These are rather high numbers for any size university. Most universities have difficulties attracting physics majors into secondary teaching, which has led to the national shortage of qualified physics teachers. The exceptional productivity of our bachelor's-only program has been recognized by the American Institute of Physics. We examine possible causes for our success from the perspectives of both our faculty and our graduates.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1D01:

The Double Compound Pendulum
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Joel C. Berlinghieri, The Citadel
843 953 6942, berlinghieri@citadel.edu
  Co-Author(s): Erik T. Pratt, Erik Rooman
  Abstract: The double compound pendulum consists of two arms usually of uniform mass per unit length. The upper arm is attached to a rigid pivot by a frictionless bearing. One end of the lower arm is attached to the bottom end of the upper arm by a frictionless bearing. The bearings in our case are PASCO rotation sensors with the lower sensor using a Bluetooth wireless connection. DataStudio is used to record the initial angles and angular velocities and the subsequent angles, angular velocities, and angular accelerations of both arms. The motion of the arms is very sensitive to the initial conditions and is often chaotic. There are ranges of initial settings in which the lower arm will eventually flip over the top of its pivot. The motion is compared to models through numerical solutions. This experiment* is performed as part of the junior-level classical mechanics and numerical methods courses.
  Footnotes: *Physics Laboratory Manual for Scientists and Engineers, Joel C. Berlinghieri, Tavenner Publishing Co., 2011, ISBN 978-1-930208-35-3
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PST1D02:

Watching and Listening to the Coefficient of Restitution
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Marco Ciocca, Eastern Kentucky University
859-622-6172, marco.ciocca@eku.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jing Wang
  Abstract: Video analysis is a research-proven effective tool in physics teaching. Students learning physics through video analysis projects show better data interpretation skills and gain deeper understanding on certain topics.[1,2] Most studies of video analysis have been focused on projects for introductory-level physics concepts. The benefit of using video analysis in upper-level physics courses is often neglected. To fill this gap, we used video analysis techniques to measure the coefficient of restitution of a ball. The results obtained compared favorably with more standard techniques, with the advantage of immediate visualization. [1] Beichner, R. J. (1996) "The impact of video motion analysis on kinematics graph interpretation skills." American Journal of Physics 64(10), 1272-1277. [2] Laws, P. and Pfister, H. (1998) "Using digital video analysis in introductory mechanics projects," The Physics Teacher 36(5), 282-287.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1D03:

A Hands-On Introduction to Quantum Mechanics for Sophomore Physics Majors
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - David P. Jackson, Dickinson College
717-245-1073, jacksond@dickinson.edu
  Co-Author(s): Brett J. Pearson
  Abstract: The Physics Department at Dickinson College has re-designed its curriculum for physics majors to take advantage of recently developed single-photon experiments in quantum mechanics.* The ultimate goal is to bring students face to face with some of the fascinating and subtle features of quantum mechanics in a hands-on setting. This is mainly accomplished in a sophomore-level course titled "Introduction to Relativistic and Quantum Physics." Experiments include the behavior of a photon at a beam splitter--it "must" go one way or the other--and the behavior of a photon at a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer--it "must" go both ways. This poster will describe our curriculum changes and discuss some of the successes and difficulties we have experienced.
  Footnotes: *This work was supported by NSF grant DUE-0737230.
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PST1D04:

Wind Power Experiments Using an Electric Leaf Blower
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Stephen Luzader,
301-689-1976, sluzader@frostburg.edu
  Co-Author(s): Hang Deng-Luzader, Samuel Akyea
  Abstract: Some simple experiments demonstrating basic principles of wind turbine operation can be carried out using an electric leaf blower in vacuum configuration as a wind source. A small DC hobby motor fitted with a model airplane propeller or a small fan blade serves as the generator, which is placed in front of the air intake of the leaf blower. The equipment required for quantitative experiments include a resistance box and voltmeter, some means of controlling the air speed, and an instrument to measure the air speed. Most departments will have resistors and voltmeters and probably a Variac for controlling the blower speed. The only special piece of equipment we purchased was a hot-wire anemometer to measure wind speed. Experiments suitable for a wide range of students will be described.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1D05:

A Systematic Error in a Boyle's Law Experiment
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Richard P. McCall, St. Louis College of Pharmacy
314-446-8473, rmccall@stlcop.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Systematic errors can cause measurements to deviate from the actual value of the quantity being measured. Using a meterstick that is not marked off correctly, using a balance to measure mass that has not been properly zeroed, or misinterpreting the range of a voltmeter are all examples. A simple Boyle's law experiment seeks to show that the pressure of a gas multiplied by its volume is a constant. A first attempt results in an experimental difference of about 5%. However, when the proper volume is taken into account, the difference reduces to about 1%. A discussion of how to measure the correct volume by indirect methods is presented.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1D06:

Spring, String, and Inclined Plane: A Lab on Newton's Laws
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Carl E. Mungan, United States Naval Academy
410-293-6680, mungan@usna.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Students in an introductory physics course are typically presented with homework problems and lab work that separately involve strings (e.g. an Atwood's machine), inclined planes (e.g. conversion of gravitational to kinetic energy), and springs (e.g. oscillations of a mass hanging from a spring). But to fully develop student understanding of Newton's laws, it is important to combine elements to build up more complex situations. To this end, I propose tying together two blocks on an inclined plane and then attaching the upper block to a spring whose other end is fixed. Students can first be challenged to draw relevant free-body diagrams, initially ignoring drag. Next, if this setup is assembled in lab, even using low-friction motion carts instead of blocks, it is immediately observed that damping cannot be neglected. However, simple speed-independent friction fits the measurements well, so that analysis of the situation remains within student capabilities.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1D07:

Mathematical Modeling-based Engineering Education through an Axiomatic Design Approach
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Rafael Gutierrez, University of Texas at El Paso
(915) 747 6901, seflores@uacj.mx
  Co-Author(s): Sergio Flores, Fernando Tovia, Mariano Olmos, Sergio Miguel Terrazas
  Abstract: Many engineering students have difficulty resolving real life problems through traditional instruction. Most of them do not develop or apply the fundamental science-math knowledge to construct a functional understanding. A mathematical modeling learning approach named Axiomatic Design represents a didactical alternative to achieve not only the scientific skills but also the ability toward the design, creativity, and innovate of engineering processes based on an adaptive expertise for learning using mathematics and physics principles. We present an axiomatic design application in the context of a block stacking situation and the corresponding expected learning outcomes.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1D07:

You Can Build a Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Your Classroom!
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Mark W. Plano Clark, Doane College
402-826-8621, mark.planoclark@doane.edu
  Co-Author(s): Paul Garcia, Axel Enders
  Abstract: Two years ago the authors proposed to produce a low-cost room-temperature atmospheric-pressure scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with atomic resolution -- to be accessible to high school and college teaching labs. Project costs are currently less than $200. The techniques to produce the STM require access to a basic machine shop and materials, and some skill in producing low-voltage (<20 V) amplifiers to drive the piezos. Each of the components make great student projects. Flat piezoceramic sheets are cut and then formed into rectangular structures to provide the x, y, and z scanning motions. We are using the open-source Gnome X Scanning Microscopy (GXSM) software and a commercial digital signal processing board but hope to produce a much cheaper digital signal processing board to further lower the cost.
  Footnotes: Paul Garcia is currently an engineering student at Washington University, St. Louis.
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PST1D08:

Hubbert Peak and Radioactive Decay Activities Using Dice
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Mark E. Rupright, Birmingham-Southern College
205-226-4875, mruprigh@bsc.edu
  Co-Author(s): Tyler Dart
  Abstract: We will outline two laboratory activities for an introductory "Energy and the Environment" course that use dice to model random behavior. In the first, we model the growth, peak, and decline in production of a resource to produce a Hubbert-type curve. In the second, we relate the random decay of individual nuclei to the exponential decay of a radioactive sample. We also show how to extend the latter activity to more complex cases in which parent/daughter isotopes have different decay rates.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1D09:

Development, Implementation, and Assessment of Ultrasound Physics Laboratory
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Karen A. Williams, East Central University
580-421-7331, kwillims@mac.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This poster will explain how an advanced laboratory, PHYS 3611 Ultrasound Physics, was developed, implemented, and assessed at ECU. Details about each laboratory exercise will be shown. The course was created to provide more laboratory experience for our medical physics majors in response to surveys done to assess the physics major. To my surprise, the course as taught so far seems to be populated by students in medical physics, physical therapy, and premedical students. This might be a lab that would attract students in your program as well. Several students have been so interested in the ultrasound lab that they have gone one step further and done research projects in the field.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1D10:

What is the Relevance of Physics Education Research to the Advanced Lab?
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Benjamin M. Zwickl, University of Colorado at Boulder
303-492-6956, benjamin.zwickl@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Noah D. Finkelstein, Heather J Lewandowski
  Abstract: The University of Colorado Boulder is in the early stages of a 2.5-year research-based redesign of our upper-division physics lab courses. There has been a nationwide resurgence of interest in advanced physics labs among instructors and faculty, but the PER community to date has focused on introductory and lecture-format classes. Little research has been conducted on these uniquely sophisticated and resource-rich learning environments in terms of goals, measurements of learning, and outcomes of modification. We are applying the existing research-base and methods of PER as a tool to make our labs better with the dual purpose of finding generalizable lessons about effective instruction in advanced lab courses. We will report preliminary outcomes that include our process of modification, learning goals, assessment frameworks, and a revised lab example.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1E01:

Mentoring Graduate Students at a Hispanic Serving Institution
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Eric Brewe, Florida International University
305-348-3507, eric.brewe@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Laird H. Kramer, Renee Michelle Goertzen
  Abstract: This poster describes the approaches we have taken to building a community of graduate students in Physics Education Research at Florida International University. Building a research group in the context of a Hispanic Serving Institution has unique features including an imperative to consider inclusive models of education. The current group of students includes students from the physics department and the College of Education. The primary approach to mentoring these students from diverse backgrounds has been to establish a learning community. We describe efforts toward building the learning community.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1E02:

Temperature Changes in Food: An Upper-Level Project
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Michael Burns-Kaurin, Spelman College
404-270-5849, mburns-k@spelman.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In the Advanced Experiments, Theory, and Modeling capstone course for physics majors at Spelman College, students work on projects that bring together principles and techniques from the intermediate-level theory and laboratory courses. In one of these projects, students measure the temperature change of a piece of food as a function of time and position as they heat or cool the food. They also work through the theory of the heat equation by looking at successively more complex situations to arrive at the full heat equation, solve the equation analytically, and create a computer simulation with parameters chosen to describe their data.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1E03:

Socratic Dialogs and Clicker Use in Upper-Division Mechanics Courses
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Lincoln D. Carr, Colorado School of Mines
303-273-3759, lcarr@mines.edu
  Co-Author(s): Vincent H. Kuo, Patrick B. Kohl, Noah Finkelstein
  Abstract: The general problem of effectively using interactive engagement in non-introductory physics courses remains open. We present a three-year study comparing different approaches to lecturing in an intermediate mechanics course at the Colorado School of Mines. In the first two years, the lectures were modified to include Socratic dialogs between the instructor and students. In the third year, the instructor used clickers and Peer Instruction. All other course materials were nearly identical to an established traditional lecture course. We present results from exams, course evaluations, the CLASS attitude survey, and a new conceptual survey. We observe little change in student exam performance as lecture techniques varied, though students consistently stated clickers were "the best part of the course" from which they "learned the most." Indeed, when using clickers in this course, students were considerably more likely to become engaged than students in CSM introductory courses using the same methods.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1E04:

Teaching Creativity and Innovation to Physicists Using Tablet PCs
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Patrick B. Kohl, Colorado School of Mines
303-384-2303, pkohl@mines.edu
  Co-Author(s): Vincent H. Kuo, Frank Kowalski, Susan Kowalksi
  Abstract: As the rest of the world catches up to the U.S. in industrial output and technological sophistication, our continued economic prosperity will depend on strengthening our historical success in generating new ideas. While there are limited efforts to foster creativity and innovation through formal and informal instruction in the business world, few efforts exist in science or engineering education. To address this, the Colorado School of Mines has recently created a dedicated Tablet PC classroom where we hold an elective physics course for the purpose of improving creativity in our students. In this poster, we report on the structure of the course and the technologies used. The latter include pedagogical implementations of InkSurvey, a free web-based software package that enables detailed, real-time interactions with the instructor. We assess student progress via the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, and discuss early work towards developing a physics-specific instrument for measuring creativity.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1E05:

Stages of Participation as Stages of Expertise
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Idaykis Rodriguez, Florida International University
305 348-4881, irodr020@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe, Laird H Kramer
  Abstract: Expertise research in physics has focused heavily on differences between experts and novices. In an effort to extend the scope of expertise research, we are engaged in an ongoing study of the development of expertise in a physics research group. To capture the features of the development of expertise in physics, we present an ethnographic, qualitative study within a physics research group. We utilize video recordings of the physics research group's weekly research meeting and guided interviews with each of eight participants in the group. These data are analyzed using Lave and Wenger's [2] perspective of learning as legitimate peripheral participation within a community of practice. We present data from this study to characterize stages of expertise and posit a trajectory novices take toward expertise.
  Footnotes: [1] Supported by NSF Award # PHY-0802184 [2]Lave J., & Wegner, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. New York: Cambridge University Press.
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PST1E06:

The Third Semester - Advantages of a Dedicated Waves/Fourier Course
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - David H Kaplan, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
618 650 2479, dkaplan@siue.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Keeping physics majors is a national priority today. Yet, many are currently lost in a transition for which they are not adequately prepared - that from first-year physics, for which the main mathematical and physical prerequisites are well defined, to modern physics and other intermediate and upper-division courses in which students are expected, with rapid on-the-fly "coverage," to quickly become proficient with properties of wave equations, wave superposition, concepts of Fourier analysis, Fourier integrals, the bandwidth theorem and more. All too often, the result has been memorization, frustration and exodus. The introduction of a third-semester dedicated course on waves and Fourier analysis as a prelude to modern physics and quantum mechanics helps in this. In this presentation we describe some of the distinct advantages of such a course for retention of physics majors and aspects of the curriculum for such a course that we have developed.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1F01:

Determining the accuracy of an ultrasonic motion detector velocity calculation.
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Dan Beeker, Indiana University
(812) 855-5903, debeeker@indiana.edu
  Co-Author(s): Alexei Krainev
  Abstract: Although the ultrasonic motion detector is ubiquitous in the first year physics labs, only rarely is the accuracy of this device examined. A simple method for determining the accuracy of motion detector velocity calculations using photogates and a Mindstorm robot is demonstrated. In addition to providing a simple way to determine the accuracy of an important parameter, the Mindstorm robot introduces a very high "play factor" to the activity.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1F02:

Correlation between students' performance on free-response and multiple-choice questions
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - ShihYin Lin, University of Pittsburgh
412-708-0116, hellosilpn@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Chandralekha Singh
  Abstract: When it comes to assessing students' learning in physics, there is always concern about the format of the assessment tool. While a multiple-choice test provides an efficient tool for assessment because it is easy to grade, some instructors are concerned that a free-response format facilitates a more accurate understanding of students' thought processes. In addition, free-response questions allow students to get partial credit for displaying different extent of understanding of the subject tested. Here, we discuss a study in which two carefully designed research-based multiple-choice questions were transformed into free-response format and implemented on an exam in a calculus-based introductory physics course. Students' performance on the free-response questions was graded twice, first by using a rubric, and second by converting the answers back to one of the choices in the original multiple-choice format (which was not provided to the students). We found that there was an excellent match between the different free-response answers and the original choices in the multiple-choice questions. The strong correlation between the two scores graded using different methods suggests that carefully designed multiple-choice assessments can mirror the relative performance on the free-response questions while maintaining the benefits of grading and ease of quantitative analysis. This work was supported by NSF.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1F03:

Using Analogical Problem Solving to Learn about Friction
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - ShihYin Lin, University of Pittsburgh
412-708-0116, hellosilpn@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Chandralekha Singh
  Abstract: Research suggests many students have the notion that the magnitude of the static frictional force is always equal to its maximum value. In this study, we examine introductory students' ability to learn from analogical problem solving between two problems that are similar in the application of physics principle (Newton's second law) but one problem involves friction which often triggers the misleading notion. Students from algebra- and calculus-based introductory physics courses were asked in a quiz to take advantage of what they learned from a solved problem provided, which was about tension in a rope, to solve another problem involving friction. To help students process through the analogy deeply and contemplate the applicability of associating the frictional force with its maximum value, students in different recitation classrooms received different scaffolding. We will discuss the types of scaffolding support that were effective in helping students learn these concepts. Supported by NSF.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1F04:

Uniform circular motion lab apparatus with persistence of vision display
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Zengqiang Liu, Saint Cloud State University
320-308-3154, zliu@stcloudstate.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jing Chen, ShunJie Yong, Steve Zinsli
  Abstract: In uniform circular motion, if angular speed doubles then centripetal acceleration quadruples. A physics lab apparatus and demonstration has been constructed to demonstrate and accurately prove the above relation in an elegant and creative way. The apparatus measures angular speed and centripetal acceleration simultaneously and reports the results using a persistence of vision (POV) display. A POV display eliminates the need for wireless communication or complicated mechanical contacts between the rotating apparatus and a data collection system. Hall Effect switches are used to sense angular speed while an accelerometer is used to sense acceleration. The POV display is constructed with light-emitting diodes. The entire system is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller. Detailed measurements with the apparatus proved its accuracy. The POV display appealed to lots of younger children when it was presented at various campus activities, making it a point of attraction for future physics public outreach activities.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1F05:

Gender Matters: The Gender Gap at the University of Michigan
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Kate E Miller, University of Michigan
248-229-2073, katemi@umich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Timothy McKay
  Abstract: While we expect that some background factors, such as prior test scores and academic preparation, should influence student success, we are concerned about inappropriate impact of uncontrollable factors, such as gender, socio-economic status, and race. In particular, there is a nationally recognized gender disparity in introductory physics performance. We describe analysis of data for 48,579 students who have taken introductory physics at the University of Michigan over 14 years. We clearly detect the presence and persistence of a gendered performance gap in all courses and in all terms considered. We find that differing mathematical preparation as reflected in SAT Math scores accounts for some of this gender gap, especially in the female dominated life science sequence. The physical science and engineering sequence, which is substantially male dominated, shows a strong gender difference even after differing mathematical preparation is accounted for.
  Footnotes: None
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PST1F06:

Using Low-friction Carts to Measure Viscosity
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:45PM - 9:30PM
  Author: Poster - Mark E. Reeves, George Washington University
2029946279, reevesme@gwu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Deepa Raghu
  Abstract: The subject of continuum mechanics is often avoided in the IPLS class, as is a meaningful discussion of nonconservative forces. This is unfortunate since viscosity is essential to understanding the physical aspects of cellular motion and heart disease. I will describe a lab in which students determine viscosity from measurements of the velocity vs. time for metal balls dropped in liquids of various viscosities from air to glycerin, and measure kinematics of the balls falling under the influence of gravity. The balls pull low-friction carts, which allows for a very small driving force and also to measure the position and velocity of the ball continuously. The students observe a variety of behaviors ranging from free fall to reaching terminal velocity. Students measure the position of the cart by an ultrasonic transducer or a photogated pulley, as the weight pulls it down the track. There are a number of non-ideal experimental aspects such as viscous drag on the string and the short drop that doesn't allow attainment of terminal velocity in less viscous liquids. These allow the students to think more deeply about the physics of realistic conditions and make use of Taylor series for their data analysis, should this be desired.
  Footnotes: This research is supported by the NSF/CCLI program. More information can be found at http://www.phys.gwu.edu/iplswiki/index.php/Laboratories
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PST1F07:

Approaches to Address Persistent Misconceptions about Electric Current Among In-service teachers
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:00PM - 8:45PM
  Author: Poster - Jung Sook Lee, Seoul National University, Korea
jslee@seas.harvard.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jung Bog Kim
  Abstract: This paper explores the development of a tutorial emphasizing movement of charges, and analyzing the changes from teachers during implementing the tutorial. We did preliminary research to determine the elementary teachers’ specific difficulties and misconceptions about electrical currents. In the results from the data, we developed a tutorial and implemented it for in-service teachers. Multiple-choice questionnaires on the concept were given before the tutorial and after completing the tutorial, multiple-choice questionnaires were given again. To better observe some of the specific changes teachers make, all activities of the tutorial were recorded and transcribed. When the educators understood the characteristics of conductors and insulators, they were able to explain friction, induction, and the movement of charges at contact points. This ended the confusion between electric charge and current. These tutorials played an important role in correcting the idea that voltage is the same as current. By emphasizing the interaction of charges in a closed circuit, the teachers understood that current was not consumed but remained constant. Also, the tutorials corrected the misconception that the battery produces constant current in all situations; instead, the teachers began thinking in terms of the movement of charges through a battery in a series and a parallel circuit. Supported by SENS (Science Education for the Next Society), BK21
  Footnotes: None
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TYC:

Favorite Activities from the TYC Classroom
  Location: TBA
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time:
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
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TYC01:

Math Machines: Connecting Physics with Math and Engineering
  Location: HC 3053
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time:
  Author: Poster - Fred Thomas, Sinclair Community College
937-832-0792, fred.thomas@mathmachines.net
  Co-Author(s): Robert Chaney
  Abstract: Math Machines is a unique technology that establishes explicit links to mathematics and engineering within physics labs and student-focused classrooms. Students design and test free-form mathematical functions to control engineering-style physical systems and complete immediate, physical and dynamic tasks. Examples include programming a light to follow an accelerating object, programming an astronomical clock to replicate the motions of the moon, programming motions of a platform to simulate earthquakes of arbitrary magnitude, and programming red, green and blue lights to display oscillating colors in various combinations. Equipment is inexpensive, consisting primarily of such things as a hobby servo motor and a 3-color LED in combination with a SensoDAQ or NI myDAQ computer interface. Schools are encouraged to build similar equipment and share it with math, science, engineering and technology teachers in their region.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NSF?s Advanced Technological Education Program through grant DUE-1003381. More information is available at www.mathmachines.net.
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TYC02:

Using a Slinky as a Solenoid in an Open Ended Lab
  Location: HC 3053
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time:
  Author: Poster - Dwain M. Desbien, Estrella Mountain CC
623-935-8474, dwain.desbien@emcmail.maricopa.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This poster will show the lab my students perform using a Slinky as a solenoid to investigate the magnetic field inside the solenoid. This is an open-ended lab with little instruction given to the students. The basic equipment is a Slinky, D cells, a 10 Ohm resistor, wires and a way to detect the magnetic field. Student results from the lab will be shown.
  Footnotes: None
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TYC03:

Visualizing and Conceptualizing Linear Momentum
  Location: HC 3053
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time:
  Author: Poster - Michael C. Faleski, Delta College
(989) 686-9495, michaelfaleski@delta.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Linear momentum is one of the concepts that students have the most difficulty understanding. Beyond applying a simple equation or a memorized result for specific scenarios, students seem to forget about using linear momentum and do not have a "feel" of what it is. This presentation will show some simple in-class questions to pose to students with quick activities that immediately demonstrate the results. In addition, a possible way to look at linear momentum from a conceptual/visualize point of view with extensions into ideas of energy will be presented.
  Footnotes: None
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