National Meeting Program Schedule

2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Tuesday, August 02

 

Total Number of Records Found: 225

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Crkrbrl02:

  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 12:15PM - 1:15PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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Crkrbrl03:

  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 12:15PM - 1:15PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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Crkrbrl04:

  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 12:15PM - 1:15PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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Crkrbrl05:

  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 12:15PM - 1:15PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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DA:

Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Physics Suite Materials that Enhance Learning in Lecture
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:40AM
  Presider: Priscilla Laws,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DA01:

Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Active Learning in Lecture
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - David R. Sokoloff, Department of Physics
541-346-4755, sokoloff@uoregon.edu
  Co-Author(s): Ronald K. Thornton
  Abstract: The results of physics education research and the availability of microcomputer-based tools have led to the development of the activity-based Physics Suite.1 Most of the Suite materials are designed for hands-on learning, for example student-oriented laboratory curricula such as RealTime Physics. One reason for the success of these materials is that they encourage students to take an active part in their learning. This interactive session will demonstrate “through active audience participation” Suite materials designed to promote active learning in lecture and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs).2 The demonstrations will be drawn from second semester topics.
  Footnotes: 1. E.F. Redish, Teaching Physics with the Physics Suite (Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, 2004). 2. David R. Sokoloff and Ronald K. Thornton, Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, 2004).
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DA02:

Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Effectiveness in Teaching Concepts
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Ronald K. Thornton
Center for Science and Math Teaching, Tufts University
617-627-2825, csmt@tufts.edu
  Co-Author(s): David R. Sokoloff
  Abstract: The effectiveness of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations in teaching physics concepts has been studied using physics education research-based, multiple-choice conceptual evaluations.1 Results of such studies will be presented. These results should be encouraging to those who wish to improve conceptual learning in lecture.
  Footnotes: 1. David R. Sokoloff and Ronald K. Thornton, ?Using Interactive Lecture Demonstrations to Create an Active Learning Environment,? Phys. Teach. 35, 340 (1997).
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DA03:

Circular Motions
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Cheng Ting, Houston Community College, Southeast
713-718-7299, cheng.ting@hccs.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Camcorders can help students to observe simple circular motions of a bicycle wheel and a simple pendulum. Video analysis will be used to study the circular motions, and allow students to build up concepts of vectors involved in the kinematics of circular motions, such as angular velocity and angular momentum. How to build the mathematical formula for students based on their observation will be discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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DB:

Adjunct Faculty Issues
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Dennis Gilbert,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DB01:

Use of Contingent Faculty and the Effect on Student Success
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Vann Priest, Rio Hondo College
562-463-7520, vpriest@riohondo.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: On average, contingent (part-time) faculty teach nearly half of the course s at community colleges. The effect of this on student retention, success, and graduation rates is either assumed to be negative or remains unknown to most faculty and college officials. In this presentation, I will review the latest research on the effects that extensive use of part-time faculty has on student success, retention, transfer rates, and graduation rates.
  Footnotes: Dennis Gilbert
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DB02:

Part-Time Faculty, Student Success, and Public Policy
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Representative Michael E. Dembrow, Oregon Legislature
503-914-9723, michaeldembrow@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk will review significant public policy issues regarding the over-use of part-time positions generally and in physics in particular in higher education. Along with the negative effects on individual faculty and on departments, these include a number of negative impacts on students: on retention and degree completion, on efforts to prepare students for success in meeting STEM education goals, and on initiatives to move college physics pedagogy in a more student-focused direction. Finally, the talk will review and explore legislative approaches to this growing problem.
  Footnotes: Dennis Gilbert--Eugene, Oregon
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DB03:

Structural Consequences of the Over use of Part-Time Positions
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Invited - Maria Knudtson, University of Nebraska at Omaha
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The widespread use of part-time positions has serious structural implications for faculty, departments, and the overall health of higher education. The discussion will cover several broad issues including the effects on faculty infrastructure, equity, academic democracy, and academic freedom, as well as model approaches for correcting dependence on contingent faculty. The pervasiveness of part-time positions provides physics faculty members with allies in addressing this issue as well as promising approaches based on the broad and diverse faculty experience.
  Footnotes: None
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DC:

Digital Textbooks: Possibilities and Perils
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:30AM
  Presider: Harold Stokes,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DC01:

Why Not Make Physics Textbooks Free?
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Justin B. Peatross, Brigham Young University
801-422-5043, peat@byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Michael J. Ware
  Abstract: We have authored an upper-division optics textbook that is freely available at www.optics.byu.edu. We call on physicists everywhere to join the Internet age and share their knowledge without charge. Electronic tools make it easy to produce and distribute a professional product. The small royalty from traditional publishing comes with a huge overhead that makes your work pricy for students. Why not forego it?
  Footnotes: AAPT sponsor: Harold Stokes
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DC02:

The Future of the Introductory Physics Textbook
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Stuart Johnson, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
(978) 462-3617, sjohnson@wiley.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The format of today's introductory physics textbook has been in place for over 100 years, but there are many indications that this format may be approaching the end of its useful life. This paper will explore the reasons why change is imminent and what the next generation of "textbooks" might look like.
  Footnotes: None
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DD:

Astronomical Image Processing
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: David Klassen,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DD01:

Observational Astronomy: Adverse Conditions and Teachable Moments
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Eddie J. Guerra, Rowan University
856 226-3430, guerra@rowan.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This presentation describes the efforts to operate an observatory atop a science building, on the suburban Rowan University campus, in the northeastern portion of the country. An outline of adverse conditions arising due to the placement of the observatory will be presented. Imagng techniques and strategies to mitigate these conditions will be presented. A gallery of images produced by college students will be displayed. The Rowan University course "Observational Astronomy" will be detailed, including its audience of both science and non-science majors. Also, the prospects for research in photometry and outreach to high schools at this and similar sites will be discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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DD02:

Chandra X-ray Astronomy Data Analysis in Educational Settings
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Terry A. Matilsky, Rutgers University
445-5500 ext. 3876, matilsky@physics.rutgers.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: How can we provide an authentic research experience to students who want to find out what science is REALLY about? We couple DS9 imaging software, a user friendly, fun-to-explore environment with a "virtual observatory" that allows analysis to be done remotely on UNIX-based computers, regardless of the platform employed by the user. All of NASA's archived satellite observations can be accessed by any interested student. Furthermore, by adapting VNC (Virtual Network Computer) software, we can enhance this flexibility enormously and allow instructors to view, comment on, and debug any analysis task in real-time, from anywhere in the world, and across all computing platforms. This makes these programs especially useful in distance learning environments.
  Footnotes: None
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DD03:

An Undergraduate Astronomy Research Class to the High School Level
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Eric G. Hintz, Brigham Young University
801-422-4168, doctor@tardis.byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Heather P. Jones
  Abstract: For over 10 years now we have taught an observational astronomy class at an advanced undergraduate level. This class teaches the methods of data acquisition, data processing, data analysis, and writing for publication, using optical data obtained on a CCD camera. The class is designed around teaching students the skills used for professional astronomical research, including the use of the IRAF reduction package developed at NOAO. The question then arises, can we train a younger group of students to perform full astronomical reductions? Over the last year we have begun development of a workshop for local high school teachers, or teachers from small colleges, to give them the tools to fully reduce astronomical data. We also had a local high school student come to us as an intern. He became our first test subject. We will report on our experiences.
  Footnotes: None
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DD04:

Using Science Images to Make Pretty Pictures for the Classroom
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Michael D. Joner, Brigham Young University
801-422-6120, jonerm@forty-two.byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Robert Gendler, David Laney
  Abstract: We have demonstrated that research images from the BYU West Mountain Observatory can often be combined to produce images that are suitable for classroom use. This process can usually be completed with little or no effort being made to secure additional image data after the completion of a research project. Results will be shown for images processed from frames obtained for science investigations and compared with images where the data were obtained specifically to produce an instructional image. We also present two amimations where the data frames are from nightly monitoring projects. Images can be previewed at the website in the abstract footnote.
  Footnotes: WMO Image Gallery - http://wmo.byu.edu/gallery/ Sponsored by: Eric G. Hintz
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DD05:

MircoObservatory Image: Astronomical Image Processing for the Public (free software)
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:50AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Patricia A. Sievert, Northern Illinois University
8157531201, psievert@niu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We teach families to use the free software, MicroObservatory Image, to process images that they request online from NASA's MicroObservatory. The software is freely available online and the learning curve is relatively easy, making it an ideal introduction to astronomical image processing for outreach. I'll present a quick overview of the program's features and locations for additional resources.
  Footnotes: www.niu.edu/stem
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DE:

The Big Bang Effect: Representation of Physicists in Popular Culture
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 10:10AM
  Presider: Jacob Clark Blickenstaff,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DE01:

Evil Geniuses: The Portrayal of Scientists as Villains
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Rebecca C. Thompson, American Physical Society
301-209-3206, thompson@aps.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: From Doctor Octopus from Spiderman to Maggie Walsh of Buffy the Vampire Slayer season 4, scientists are often portrayed as evil geniuses intent on using their high IQs to take over the world. Does this affect how the public views scientists? Science in general and physics specifically is so often thought of as "scary." Misconceptions about talking robots and world eating black holes can turn people against physics and the "evil genius" scientists that will destroy the world, either by accident or on purpose.
  Footnotes: None
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DE02:

Speaking of Physics: The Art of Science Communication
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Stephanie V. Chasteen, University of Colorado Boulder
303-775-3277, stephanie.chasteen@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Why leave it up to the"experts" (i.e., the media) to portray physics accurately and positively? Speak for yourself, without the need for a translator who may "or may not" get it right. As a scientist, you can talk about what your work means and why it's important with an authority that a science writer doesn't bring to the table. While we can't all be Brian Greene, you can have control over how your work, and physics in general, is presented to the public. In this talk, I'll share some best practices of science communication, gleaned during my time as a science reporter at NPR and elsewhere. These simple tips can take a lifetime to master, but can help you get your message across, to the public, the media, and even Aunt Mabel.
  Footnotes: See Dr. Chasteen's popular publications and podcasts at http://sciencegeekgirl.com/publications.html. More tips on communication at http://communicatingscience.aaas.org.
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DE03:

The Big Bang Theory Effect Conjecture
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Invited - Jacob Clark Blickenstaff,
6012664742, JCLARKBLICKENSTAFF@GMAIL.COM
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: It could be argued that physics and physicists have not had such popular exemplars as Sheldon and Leonard (the main characters on CBS' Big Bang Theory) since the death of Albert Einstein. Dr. David Salzberg consults on the physics shown on white boards in the show so that material is trustworthy. But how "true" is the representation of physics and physicists that Sheldon and Leonard present to the general public on television every week? How about the female scientists who show up in recurring (though generally not starring) roles? Does it really matter if a TV comedy re-enforces stereotypes about science and scientists? What effect could this show have on students? Interest in learning physics in high school or college? As a physics educator I am concerned that this show and others like it will exacerbate the trend of undergraduates moving away from the physics major.
  Footnotes: None
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DE04:

'Physicists and Scientists' on TV....Is THAT Really US?
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 10:00AM - 10:10AM
  Author: Karen A. Williams, East Central University
580-559-5394, kwillims@mac.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Most of us have watched the "Big Bang Theory" on television and thought at times, this reminds me of Dr. X or Dr. Y. Other scenes make us think that isn't true of physicists we know….or is it? Are these depictions characteristic of us? Greater discussion of physics and science from my students seems to come from "Mythbusters" and some other science shows on television now hosted by real physicists. How do TV shows portray scientists? This will examine how various groups (physics majors, nonmajors, etc.) perceive physics/science (i.e. the endeavor) based upon watching physicists/scientists on television. How do they perceive those that do science? Is this perception negative so that it might persuade a high school student to change his mind about becoming a physicist? Is this perception positive for male students? For female students?
  Footnotes: None
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DF:

Research-based Pedagogy in the High School
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Daniel Crowe,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DF01:

Modeling Instruction in the High Schools: A Research-based Curriculum
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Dwain M. Desbien, Estrella Mountain CC
623-935-8474, dwain.desbien@emcmail.maricopa.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk will focus on the Modeling Theory of Physics as developed by the modeling group at ASU (led by David Hestenes). I will discuss the research underpinnings of the curriculum, the curriculum itself, and the models used in the curriculum. Discussion of the workshops where teachers can learn the modeling technique will be discussed and information on how to apply will be given. Finally some results from the modeling workshop project on student learning will be given.
  Footnotes: None
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DF02:

PRISMS PLUS -- A High School Physics Curriculum
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Lawrence T. Escalada, University of Northern Iowa
319-273-2431, Lawrence.Escalada@uni.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Physics Resources and Instructional Strategies for Motivation Students (PRISMS) is a high school physics curriculum that utilizes a learning cycle pedagogy. PRISMS originated in 1982 as a collection of 130 high interest activities related to real-life student experiences. PRISMS was revised and enhanced with funding from the National Science Foundation and made available as PRISMS PLUS. PRISMS PLUS is based on physics education research and the recommendations of national science education initiatives. Students are guided through high-interest activities that engage them in exploring patterns and relationships; formulating concepts based on evidence; and applying these concepts to new phenomena, using the concepts to predict the behavior of physical phenomena. PRISMS PLUS includes more than 40 complete learning cycles with conceptual support materials to help students develop conceptual understanding of the basics physics ideas introduced. PRISMS provides the pedagogy for many of the UNI Physics preparation and professional development programs for science teachers.
  Footnotes: None
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DF03:

Helping Your Students Learn Physics and Think Like Scientists
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Invited - Eugenia Etkina, Rutgers University
732-932-7496, eugenia.etkina@gse.rutgers.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We often spend the first week of classes teaching our students how science works and then switch to our traditional delivery mode telling them what the laws of physics are and how to use them to solve back-of-the-chapter problems. Is it possible for our students to learn physics concepts and laws by actually practicing science? What does it mean to practice science in a high school classroom? In this talk I will describe two curricula, "Investigative Science Learning Environment" (ISLE) and Physics Union Mathematics (PUM), that engage your students in the processes mirroring scientific practice when learning physics. These curricula help them experience physics first hand as their own creation. They engage the students in data collection and analysis, help them learn how to devise their own explanations, how to test them with new experiments, and how to make meaningful connections to mathematics.
  Footnotes: None
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DG:

New AP B Where Are You?
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:30AM
  Presider: Martha Lietz,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DG01:

Part I. The New AP Physics B Curriculum
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Gay B. Stewart, University of Arkansas
479-575-2408, gstewart@uark.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The latest information released by College Board in regard to the new AP Physics B courses--Physics 1 and Physics 2 will be presented, including an overview of the curriculum framework along with the division of content between Physics 1 and Physics 2. Currently, Physics B is supposed to follow a preparatory course. Now, the material is divided up and deepened to make each year a stand-alone, rigorous, conceptual and problem-solving course. These courses can be placed flexibly into a school's curriculum; examples, alignment of the courses with college courses and possible ramifications for college credit will be discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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DG02:

Part II. Teaching the New AP Physics B
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Connie J. Wells, Pembroke Hill School
816-936-1466, cwells@pembrokehill.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The conceptual level for the newly designed course will be significantly deeper, thereby allowing teachers more time for inquiry-based, student-centered learning. Suggested approaches to the incorporation of elements of the redesigned courses into current AP Physics courses will be offered as teachers plan during the interim between now and first year of implementation of the new curriculum. New teachers will discover an approach to physics teaching that merges conceptual development with scientific practice. Experienced teachers will see how their current practices merge with the goals of Physics 1 and Physics 2. Participants will gain insight into what impact these changes may have on their current teaching practices. Participants will be given examples of how these new courses can be placed flexibly into a school's curriculum, and the teacher support materials that will accompany both courses will also be discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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DH:

Research on Learning Assistants and TA's
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:50AM
  Presider: Gary White,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DH01:

Teaching Assistants' Reasons for the Design of Problem Solutions for Introductory Physics: Rationale and Methodology
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: William Mamudi, Western Michigan University
269-267-0712, william.o.mamudi@wmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Charles Henderson, Shih-Yin Lin, Chandralekha Singh, Edit Yerushalmi
  Abstract: As part of a larger study to understand how instructors make teaching decisions, we investigated how graduate teaching assistants (TA's) perceive features of written problem solutions. TA's are an important population to understand; they often provide significant instruction and they also represent the pool of future physics faculty. This talk will focus on the methodology used to study TA's enrolled in a training course. Data were collected via a series of tasks related to concrete instructional artifacts (solutions to the same physics problem that vary in their representation of expert problem solving as well as in their instructional approach). Important aspects of the design were a) using artifacts from a previous study of faculty to allow for comparison of results, b) developing a written questionnaire that requires respondents to explicitly connect problem features with preferences and reasons, and c) documenting respondent ideas both pre- and post-discussion within their training course.
  Footnotes: None
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DH02:

Teaching Assistants' Reasons for the Design of Problem Solutions for Introductory Physics: Findings
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: Shih-Yin Lin, University of Pittsburgh
412-708-0116, hellosilpn@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Chandralekha Singh, William Mamudi, Charles Henderson, Edit Yerushalmi
  Abstract: As part of a larger study to understand how instructors make teaching decisions, we investigated how graduate teaching assistants (TA's) perceive features of written problem solutions. TAs are an important population to understand; they often provide significant instruction and they also represent the pool of future physics faculty. Twenty-four first-year graduate TA's enrolled in a training course were provided with different instructor solutions for the same physics problem and asked to discuss their preferences for prominent solution features. Preliminary findings reveal that providing a schematic visualization of the problem, listing knowns/unknowns, and explaining reasoning in explicit words were the most valued features. Preferences for different features were sometimes in conflict with each other. For example, while the TA's valued solutions where reasoning was explicitly explained, they also valued concise solution. We'll present the reasons behind these preferences and discuss the implications for the professional development of physics TA's.
  Footnotes: None
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DH03:

Assessing Reflective Practice through Learning Assistant Reflections
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Geraldine L. Cochran, Florida International University
305-348-3000, gcoch001@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Laird H. Kramer, Eric Brewe
  Abstract: We have analyzed reflections from our chemistry, mathematics, and physics undergraduate learning assistants (LAs) seminar to examine their development of reflective teaching practices. One goal of Florida International University's (FIU) LA seminar is to help our participants develop as reflective practitioners. We endeavor to reach this goal by means of classroom activities, classroom discussion, and reflective homework assignments. Weekly reflective papers on course readings and teaching experiences are assigned to help our students reach higher levels of reflection. To assess our Las' level of reflection, we analyzed reflections using Hatton and Smith's (1995) [1] "criteria for the recognition of evidence for different types of reflective writing." The three discipline-based LA programs at FIU utilizing the LA seminar are structurally different and include different kinds of teaching experiences. Thus, we have also investigated whether or not participation in the various programs may result in different levels of reflection for the Las.
  Footnotes: [1] Hatton, N. & Smith, D. (1995). Reflection in teacher education: towards definition and implementation. Teaching and Teacher Education 11, 33-49. Work supported by PhysTEC and NSF PHY-0802184
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DH04:

Engaging Instructors in Discussing Student Difficulties: A Model for Preparation
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Benjamin T. Spike, University of Colorado - Boulder
303-406-3667, spike@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Noah D. Finkelstein
  Abstract: We report on the results of a recent effort to modify graduate Teaching Assistant (TA) preparation for the Tutorials in Introductory Physics by focusing instructor attention on potential student difficulties rather than simply the mastery of content. We track shifts in instructor awareness of student difficulties with Tutorials as a result of a simple intervention during TA preparation sessions. We share findings from this semester-long effort, and conclude by discussing broader implications for teacher preparation in both traditional and transformed environments.
  Footnotes: None
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DH05:

Effects of the Learning Assistant 'Treatment' on In-Service Teachers' Practices
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Kara E. Gray
School of Education, University of Colorado, Boulder
303-718-4544, kara.gray@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): David C. Webb, Valerie K Otero
  Abstract: The Colorado Learning Assistant (LA) Program serves as a content-specific supplement to standard teacher preparation programs. In addition to transforming undergraduate STEM courses, it recruits and prepares math and science majors for teaching careers by involving university STEM faculty. The research reported here compares the teaching practices of in-service teachers who had the LA "treatment" as undergraduates to colleagues who did not participate in the LA program as undergraduates but were certified through the same program. We report on teachers' views of assessments, their views of learning, and differences in their teaching practices. This analysis is based on interviews with approximately 30 teachers and observations of their classrooms throughout their induction years of teaching. This work considers how the LA program may help improve current teacher preparation models.
  Footnotes: This work is partially funded by NSF grant #ESI-0554616.
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DH06:

Comparing Learning Assistants' Classroom Practices to Colleagues Using Artifact Methodology
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Stephanie A. Barr, University of Colorado, Boulder
708-510-3487, stephanie.barr@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Valerie K. Otero
  Abstract: The Scoop notebook [1] is an instructional artifact package developed to assess teachers' use of reform classroom practices. It is one of the tools used by University of Colorado's LA-Test research group to characterize differences in the classroom practices between former Learning Assistants (Las) teaching at the secondary level, and their colleagues. Analysis of these artifacts indicate significant differences between LA and non-LA groups. Other data sources corroborate these findings [2]. We will discuss the implications of this study and make inferences about the role of the LA experience in teacher preparation. We will also describe the method of using artifact packages to study classroom practice, discussing the pros and cons of this type of data.
  Footnotes: [1] H. Borko, B.M. Stecher, A.C. Alonzo, S. Moncure, and S. McClam, Educational Assessment 10, 73-104 (2005). [2] Gray, K., Webb, D. & Otero, V. (2010). Are Learning Assistants Better K-12 Science Teachers? In C. Henderson, M. Sabella, & C. Singh (Eds.) 2009 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings. Melville, NY: AIP Press. * This work is partially funded by NSF grant # ESI ? 00554616.
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DH07:

Case Studies of Increasing Participation in a Physics Learning Community
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Renee Michelle Goertzen, Florida International University
2408210456, rgoertze@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe, Laird Kramer
  Abstract: We present a case study of two introductory undergraduate physics students' increasing participation in the physics learning community at Florida International University (FIU). An implicit goal in the reforms implemented by the Physics Education Research Group at FIU has been the establishment of multiple opportunities for entry into and participation in a community of physics learners. These opportunities include classes using research-based curricula (Modeling Instruction and Investigative Science Learning Environment), a Learning Assistant program, and a growing cohort of physics majors. Using interviews conducted across a year of introductory physics, we explore the trajectories of two students who have successfully increased their participation in a physics learning community.
  Footnotes: None
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DH08:

Assessing Laboratories through Pre- and Post-testing: Optics
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Drew Baigrie, Texas Tech University
806-742-2996, drew.baigrie@ttu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Beth Thacker, Keith West, Mark Ellermann, Mahmoud Yaqoub
  Abstract: We present the results of written pre- and post-tests administered in large algebra-based and calculus-based introductory physics laboratories and a small inquiry-based, laboratory-based, algebra-based course. We also examine student performance as a function of TA teaching style, which is ranked using the RTOP assessment.
  Footnotes: This project is supported by the NIH grant 5RC1GM090897-02. Sponsored by Beth Thacker.
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DI:

PER: Student Reasoning II
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:50AM
  Presider: Taha Mzoughi,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DI01:

Intuitive Ontologies for Energy in Physics
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Rachel E. Scherr, Seattle Pacific University
2066617501, rescherr@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Sarah B. McKagan, Hunter G. Close, Matthew J. Jones
  Abstract: The nature of energy is not typically an explicit topic of physics instruction. Nonetheless, participants in physics courses that involve energy are constantly saying what kind of thing they think energy is, both verbally and nonverbally. The premise of an embodied-cognition theoretical perspective is that we understand the kinds of things that may exist in the world (ontology) in terms of sensorimotor experiences such as object permanence and movement [1]. We offer examples of intuitive ontologies for energy that we have observed in classroom contexts, including energy as a quasi-material substance; as a means of activation; as a fuel; and as an ineffable quantity which is not subject to further analysis. In the classroom, multiple and overlapping metaphors for energy complement one another in complex representations of physical phenomena. [2]
  Footnotes: [1] Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1999). Philosophy in the flesh: The embodied mind and its challenge to Western thought. New York: Basic Books. [2] Gupta, A., Hammer, D., & Redish, E. F. (2010). The case for dynamic models of learners' ontologies in physics. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 19(3), 285-321 and Hammer, D., Gupta, A., & Redish, E. F. (2011). On static and dynamic intuitive ontologies. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 20(1), 163-168. Supported in part by supported in part by the National Science Foundation (DRL 0822342).
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DI02:

'Productive Disciplinary Engagement' in the Context of Energy
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: Warren M. Christensen,
7012316744, Warren.Christensen@ndsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Rachel E. Scherr, Hunter G Close, Sarah B McKagan, Eleanor W Close
  Abstract: The concept of "productive disciplinary engagement" [1] (PDE) provides a layered method for describing experiences in which learners are interacting with one another. The four principles of PDE align with much of the Physics Education Research community's effort in instructional design: 1) Problematizing Content, 2) Giving Students Authority, 3) Holding Students Accountable to Others and Disciplinary Norms, and 4) Providing Relevant Resources. Authentic experiences of this kind are not common in most classrooms and significant challenges arise when attempting to create them. We present examples of PDE from a summer Professional Development course on energy at Seattle Pacific University and consider both the observational criteria by which PDE is identified and the features of the instruction that contributed to making it possible.
  Footnotes: [1] Engle, R.A. and Conant, F.R. ?Guiding Principles for Fostering Productive Disciplinary Engagement: Explaining an Emergent Argument in a Community of Learners Classroom,? Cog & Inst, 20 (4) 2002. Supported in part by NSF DRL 0822342.
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DI03:

Two Right Answers: The Difficulty of Reconciling Competing Physics Commitments
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Benedikt W. Harrer, University of Maine
2073479853, benedikt.harrer@maine.edu
  Co-Author(s): Rachel E. Scherr, Michael C Wittmann, Brian W Frank, Hunter G Close
  Abstract: In group settings, we sometimes see learners commit to arguments that, although seemingly contradictory, are both correct and appropriate. Groups may have difficulties reconciling these competing commitments. In a professional development course at SPU, secondary teachers are discussing the energy flow in a refrigerator to find out how refrigerators work. While one teacher shows commitment to the idea that refrigerators move heat from a relatively cold compartment to a hotter environment, two others appear committed to the second law of thermodynamics which states that heat flows from hot to cold. Video records of the discussion show that the teachers recognize the disparity of their commitments but do not spontaneously reconcile the contradiction. Our analysis shows why all group members are right to believe in their respective commitments, points out difficulties they have reconciling the contradicting commitments, and explores possible causes for these difficulties.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NSF DRL 0822342.
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DI04:

Understanding Forms of Energy through Testing Novel Cases
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Stamatis Vokos, Seattle Pacific University
206-281-2385, vokos@spu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Warren Christensen, Eleanor Close, Sarah McKagan, Rachel Scherr and Lane Seeley
  Abstract: National and state standards often list forms of energy that students should know, including gravitational, kinetic, potential, etc. Form can be a useful shorthand for describing the state of the system, or it can be a meaningless label to be memorized. Most physics instruction does not emphasize a deep understanding of the physical meaning of form. Are there ways that our instruction could more effectively help students gain an understanding of form? One way to develop and test understanding of forms of energy is to ask the question, "What must be considered when deciding whether a new form is legitimate?" We present case studies of students struggling with the legitimacy of forms of energy not listed in the standards, some of which they deem to be legitimate and some of which they do not. Finally, we suggest instructional methods to take advantage of this struggle.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NSF DRL 0822342
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DI05:

Conservation of Energy vs. Conservation of Value in Energy
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Sarah McKagan, McKagan Enterprises
2063354325, sam.mckagan@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Lezlie DeWater, Rachel Scherr, Lane Seeley, Stamatis Vokos
  Abstract: When teaching about energy in physics class, an important learning goal for students is an understanding of conservation of energy. Outside of physics class, the word "conservation" is often used with an entirely different meaning: In the real world, we care about "conserving" a finite and expendable resource. This resource is often referred to as "energy," but in the more precise language of physics we would call it "useful energy" or "value" in energy. We present results from a collaboration in which SPU visual communication majors, after extensive discussions with members of the physics department, produced posters to depict various energy concepts and to communicate their understanding. Many of these posters explicitly highlight the distinction between "energy" and "value," Illustrating how nonscientists struggle with this issue. We discuss how this struggle may play out for students in physics classes, and suggest a method for redirecting students' useful intuitions about value.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NSF DRL 0822342
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DI06:

Interpretations of P.E. Diagrams by Introductory Students while Learning QM
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Brian M. Stephanik, University of Washington
(253) 678-5941, bsteph@u.washington.edu
  Co-Author(s): Peter S. Shaffer, Lillian C McDermott
  Abstract: In order for students to relate quantum and classical mechanics they must have a sufficiently strong foundation of some basic concepts in classical physics. We have found that students in introductory courses who are learning quantum mechanics sometimes struggle with these classical concepts in ways that can inhibit their ability to connect these two regimes. Examples of our findings in the context of potential energy diagrams, as well as preliminary attempts to address student difficulties, will be presented.
  Footnotes: None
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DI07:

Characterizing Student and Teacher Descriptions of Pressure*
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Amy D. Robertson, University of Washington
(206)251-1194, awrob@uw.edu
  Co-Author(s): Peter S. Shaffer, Lillian C McDermott
  Abstract: A basic assumption of kinetic-molecular theory is that the pressure of a gas is generated by collisions of gas particles with the walls of the container. This assumption is often used to derive an expression that relates the pressure of a gas to the kinetic energy of the gas particles and ultimately connects the microscopic model for pressure to the ideal gas law. In a series of questions that were developed to elicit microscopic descriptions of pressure, student and teacher explanations revealed a variety of macroscopic and microscopic descriptions of pressure that had no obvious connection to collisions of gas particles with the container walls. Examples will be presented, together with a brief discussion of possible implications for instruction in physics and chemistry courses.
  Footnotes: *This work has been supported under a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.
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DI08:

Pulling a Spring Taut Affects Students' Talk about Wave Propagation
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Michael C. Wittmann, University of Maine
(207) 581-1237, mwittmann@maine.edu
  Co-Author(s): Evan Chase
  Abstract: Students' responses to questions about wave propagation along a taut spring indicate that many believe the effort exerted by the hand making a wavepulse affects the speed with which it moves.[1] We have previously suggested that these responses may depend on how the students imagine the physical scenario--is the hand creating a wavepulse on an already taut spring, or is the spring first pulled taut and then the wavepulse is created?[2] In the latter situation, we expect students to be more inclined to correctly think of the tension on the spring affecting the wave speed. We created two interview tasks to investigate our prediction. Evidence shows that students who pull the spring taut before creating a wavepulse do not answer questions about wave speed by discussing "the force imparted to the wave."
  Footnotes: 1. Wittmann, M.C., Steinberg, R.N., and Redish, E.F., The Physics Teacher, 37:15?21. (1999) 2. Wittmann, M.C., Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2010) - Vol. 1, Full Papers, 659-666. (2010)
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DJ:

Upper Division Undergraduate
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:40AM
  Presider: Paul Dolan,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DJ01:

Percolating the Classroom: Using Mathematica to Introduce Percolation Concepts
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Timothy D. Hooper, Penn State Altoona
814-949-5049, tdh16@psu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Gary J. Weisel, Darin T Zimmerman
  Abstract: More than 12,000 articles have been published on the physics of percolation, yet only a handful have attempted to teach the concept to undergraduate students. However, with increases in computing power and widely available software packages, getting started on the study of percolation is a much simpler task today than it was 30 years ago. In this presentation, we show how undergraduate science and engineering students can use a standard desktop computer running Mathematica to perform sophisticated investigations of two-dimensional lattices. In a special topics research course, second-year students learned how to simulate percolation in various lattice geometries, calculate cluster statistics, and extract critical exponents from the simulation data. These students made fundamental connections between the mathematics and physics of percolating systems and reached an understanding of a fundamental physical process that unfortunately, is not often part of a typical undergraduate curriculum.
  Footnotes: None
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DJ02:

Displaying Sounds with Real-Time Frequency Analyzers
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: David Keeports, Mills College
510-430-2162, dave@mills.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Real-time frequency analyzers (RTFAs) are available as free online downloads, and they are incorporated even in entry-level music production programs such as Apple's GarageBand. Outputting the sound of a drawbar organ though an RTFA clearly shows the analyzer's function. I will present some ways in which this software can be used to display spectral subtleties of sounds that single instantaneous Fourier transforms cannot reveal. When a string is plucked, harmonics initially decay at different rates. Real-time spectral analysis of speech exposes difficulties in representing vowel and consonant sounds as Fourier series. An RTFA provides a useful tool for showing how "resonance box beating" extends to the beating of harmonic waves. Additionally, an RTFA explains why the sound of harmonic waves beating resembles sound processed by a musical phase shifter.
  Footnotes: None
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DJ03:

Magnetic Resonance (MR) Analogy for a Charged Particle Dynamics in a Magnetic Field
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Michael B. Partensky, Brandeis University
781-894-5917, partensky@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Valery P. Putyrsky
  Abstract: An analogy between the Bloch Equations (BE) of the MR theory (MRT) and the dynamics equations (DE) for a charged particle in a magnetic field allows for a unified description of two different groups of electromagnetic phenomena. In a static magnetic field B0, BE for magnetization M and DE for the velocity V, are formally equivalent. Hence, V(t) performs Larmor precession around the direction of B0, resulting in a familiar helical trajectory. With oscillating magnetic field, this analogy still holds under certain conditions, e.g., if the Lorenz force due to the induced electric field can be neglected. This bridges the MRT and the particle dynamics. The resonant behaviors of V are described in the rotating reference frame [1]. The particle trajectories are discussed and compared with the solutions accounting for the effects of the induced electric field. [1] I.I. Rabi, N.F. Ramsay, J. Schwinger, Rev. Mod. Phys., 64, 167 (1954)
  Footnotes: None
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DJ04:

Stages of Participation as Stages of Expertise
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Idaykis Rodriguez, Florida International University
305 348-4881, irodr020@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe, Laird H Kramer
  Abstract: Expertise research in physics has focused heavily on differences between experts and novices. In an effort to extend the scope of expertise research, we are engaged in an ongoing study of the development of expertise in a physics research group. To capture the features of the development of expertise in physics, we present an ethnographic, qualitative study within a physics research group. We utilize video recordings of the physics research group's weekly research meeting and guided interviews with each of eight participants in the group. These data are analyzed using Lave and Wenger's [2] perspective of learning as legitimate peripheral participation within a community of practice. We present data from this study to characterize stages of expertise and posit a trajectory novices take toward expertise.
  Footnotes: [1] Supported by NSF Award # PHY-0802184 [2]Lave J., & Wegner, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. New York: Cambridge University Press
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DJ05:

Graduate Students' Perceptions of Scientific Collaborations after Researching in China
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Anne W. Collins, University of California, Santa Barbara
8056360189, anne.wrigley@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Anne E. Emerson, Danielle B Harlow, Julie A Bianchini
  Abstract: Scientific practice is increasingly a collaborative endeavor, especially as the world becomes more global (Katsouyanni, 2008). While research thrives on scientific partnerships, few studies look beyond publication counts and, instead, investigate what constitutes such an alliance (Lee & Bozeman, 2005). Although publications certainly motivate collaboration, studies that measure collaborative networks solely by counting publications are limited since they do not provide a comprehensive picture of the collaborative process. With this in mind, we examined U.S. and Chinese graduate students' motivations and perceptions of collaboration as a result of participation in a research-abroad program in the fields of electron chemistry, catalysis, and electron microscopy. Our findings provide insight into what motivates science partnerships and the features of successful collaborations. Our study has implications for those looking to develop and foster international collaborations.
  Footnotes: Katsouyanni, K. (2008). Collaborative research: accomplishments and potential. Environmental Health, 7(3), 1-7. Lee, S. & Bozeman, B. (2005). The impact of research collaboration on scientific productivity. Social Studies of Science, 35(5), 673‐702.
Sponsored by Danielle B. Harlow
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DJ06:

Socratic Dialogs and Clicker Use in Upper-Division Mechanics Courses
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Lincoln D. Carr, Colorado School of Mines
303-273-3759, lcarr@mines.edu
  Co-Author(s): Vincent H. Kuo, Patrick B. Kohl, Noah Finkelstein
  Abstract: The general problem of effectively using interactive engagement in non-introductory physics courses remains open. We present a three-year study comparing different approaches to lecturing in an intermediate mechanics course at the Colorado School of Mines. In the first two years, the lectures were modified to include Socratic dialogs between the instructor and students. In the third year, the instructor used clickers and Peer Instruction. All other course materials were nearly identical to an established traditional lecture course. We present results from exams, course evaluations, the CLASS attitude survey, and a new conceptual survey. We observe little change in student exam performance as lecture techniques varied, though students consistently stated clickers were "the best part of the course" from which they "learned the most." Indeed, when using clickers in this course, students were considerably more likely to become engaged than students in CSM introductory courses using the same methods.
  Footnotes: None
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DJ07:

Light Reflection from a Uniformly Moving Mirror, a General Principle
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: J. Ronald Galli, Weber State University
801 393 2965, jrgalli@weber.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: When light is reflected from a uniformly moving mirror, the reflected and incident angles are equal only for special cases. Reasons for this will be presented and a more basic principle of reflection will be suggested.
  Footnotes: None
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EA:

Impact of New K-12 Standards on Teachers and Teacher Training
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 2:15PM
  Presider: Elaine Gwynn,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EA01:

Getting Ready for the New Generation of K-12 Physics Standards
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Panel - Patricia Heller, University of Minnesota
612-750-2031, helle002@umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Compared to the current K-12 science standards, the new research-based physics standards: (a) have more explicit statements of the physics principles and concepts students should understand; (b) require more application of these principles and concepts to real world situations; (c) require increasing intellectual sophistication and higher levels of abstraction as grade levels progress from elementary to middle school to high school, and (d) reflect a current (modern) view of physics. These differences will impact how we prepare future teachers. This presentation outlines how the new standards will affect the physics content of courses for teachers.
  Footnotes: None
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EA02:

Impact of National Science Standards on Teachers and Teacher Training
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Panel - Jim Woodland, Nebraska Department of Education
402/471-4329, jim.woodland@nebraska.gov
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: A perspective from a state department of education on the impact of state science standards on classroom instruction, curriculum, assessment, and teacher preparation.
  Footnotes: Elaine Gwinn
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EA03:

New Physics Standards in Texas
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Panel - Jill Marshall,
512 232-9685, marshall@mail.utexas.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: As of 2009 Texas physics teachers are teaching under a revised set of standards for what students should be able to do, the revised Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills or TEKS for physics. Although changes to the TEKS were "evolutionary not revolutionary," a new structure organizing the topics was imposed and a new emphasis was placed on conceptual understanding. New standards relating to optics and nuclear physics were added.
  Footnotes: None
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EB:

PER: Topical Understanding and Attitudes
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:15PM
  Presider: Linda Winkler,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EB01:

Analysis of Multiple Choice Problems in Terms of Conditions in the National Test about Force and Energy
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 1:25PM
  Author: Hyeon-Suk Choi, Korea National University of Education
821055222097, eovnddl@hotmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Jung bok Kim
  Abstract: Multiple-choice tests are widely used and their importance seems likely to grow, due to their inherent suitability. Many diagnostic instruments have been developed often in the form of multiple-choice tests. This study was to survey setting up conditional terms on the choice items of the Force and Energy section in a high school physics test by Korea Institute of Curriculum & Evaluation (KICE). A total of 78 items were analyzed by a framework representing the conditional terms. 23 among 78 items contained connotative conditional terms. Expressed conditional terms presented 69 of the 78 items. On the other hand, nine of 78 items did not contain both connotative and expressed conditional terms. We were able to group conditional terms into preventing correct dispute, conditional terms of scientific error, or unnecessary conditional terms to get the correct answer to items.
  Footnotes: None
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EB02:

Using Online Homework Data to Assess Student Confidence
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:25PM - 1:35PM
  Author: Andrew Pawl, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
608-342-6160, pawla@uwplatt.edu
  Co-Author(s): Joseph D. Peterson
  Abstract: A popular type of question in online homework involves a set of several true/false statements where students must submit their answer to all the statements at once. This discourages random guessing because although one true/false statement has only two possible answers, a question containing N such statements has two raised to the Nth power possible answers. We have studied student response patterns to a number of these questions with the goal of determining which of the individual true/false statements exhibit a large proportion of response switches (i.e. from true to false or from false to true) and which statements exhibit largely consistent responses. The tendency of students to change their answer to a statement or to remain consistent is one indication of student confidence in the knowledge tested.
  Footnotes: None
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EB03:

Students' Views of Macroscopic and Microscopic Energy in Physics and Biology
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:35PM - 1:45PM
  Author: Benjamin W. Dreyfus
Department of Physics, University of Maryland - College Park
917-821-2405, dreyfus@umd.edu
  Co-Author(s): Edward F. Redish, Jessica Watkins
  Abstract: Energy concepts are fundamental across the sciences, yet these concepts can be fragmented along disciplinary boundaries, rather than integrated into a coherent whole. To teach physics effectively to biology students, we need to understand students' disciplinary perspectives. We present interview data from an undergraduate student who displays multiple stances toward the concept of energy. At times he views energy in macroscopic contexts as a separate entity from energy in microscopic (particularly biological) contexts, while at other times he uses macroscopic physics phenomena as productive analogies for understanding energy in the microscopic biological context, and he reasons about energy transformations between the microscopic and macroscopic scales. This case study displays preliminary evidence for the context dependence of students' ability to translate energy concepts across scientific disciplines. This points to challenges that must be taken into account in developing curricula for biology students that integrate physics and biology concepts.
  Footnotes: None
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EB04:

Comparing Students, Individual and Group Work in an Electronics Lab
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:45PM - 1:55PM
  Author: Nasser M. Juma, Kansas State University
785-532-1612, mhuninas@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): N. Sanjay Rebello, Kristan L. Corwin, Brian R. Washburn
  Abstract: We observed students as they worked on lab experiments in an upper-division electronics and instrumentation laboratory course. In the first half of the course the students learned about various analog and digital electronic components through mini-lectures and laboratory activities. They built various electronic circuits using their knowledge of these electronic components. In the second half of the course students teamed up to work on an open-ended capstone project that required them to use their knowledge of electronics learned in the first half of the course to improve the measurements done on a physics experiment they have worked on in a previous semester. As a group, the students thought of ideas to improve the measurement design and then built circuitry to implement this improved design. We describe findings from this study and highlight how the students' group work during the capstone project compares with their individual work before the capstone project.
  Footnotes: This work is supported in part by NSF grant DUE-0736897.
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EB05:

Improving Students' Understanding of Coulomb's Law and Gauss's Law
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:55PM - 2:05PM
  Author: Jing Li, University of Pittsburgh
412-526-8896, fairylee86@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Chandralekha Singh
  Abstract: We discuss the development and evaluation of five research-based tutorials on Coulomb's law, Gauss’s law, and the superposition principle to help students in the calculus-based introductory physics courses learn these concepts. The tutorials were developed based upon research on students' difficulties on relevant topics. We discuss the performance of students on the pre-/post-tests given before and after the tutorials, respectively, in four calculus-based introductory physics courses. We also compare the performance of students who used the tutorials with those who did not use them. We find that students performed significantly better in classes in which tutorials were used than in the classes where students learned the material via traditional lecture only. We also found that the students who worked on the tutorials and performed differently in the pre-test all have improvement in the post-test.
  Footnotes: None
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EB06:

Student Understanding of the Approach to Thermal Equilibrium
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:05PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Michael E. Loverude, California State University Fullerton
657-278-2270, mloverude@fullerton.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This paper describes work that is part of an ongoing collaboration to study student learning of thermal physics and develop curricular materials suitable for upper-division courses. The current work describes research on student understanding of the approach to thermal equilibrium. In the hybrid "thermal physics" approach, thermal equilibrium is examined on the macroscopic level but also as a statistical phenomenon. We examine student understanding of these different treatments in the context of two interacting solids, and discuss implications for instruction.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NSF grant DUE 0817335. Any opinions and findings are the work of the author and do not necessarily represent the view of the National Science Foundation.
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EB07:

Students' Perceptions of the Pathway Active Learning Environment^1
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 2:25PM
  Author: Sytil K. Murphy
Kansas State University Physics Department
(785) 532-1824, smurphy@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Christopher M. Nakamura, Dean A. Zollman, Michael Christel, Scott Stevens
  Abstract: The Pathway Active Learning Environment (PALE) features a synthetic tutor that provides pre-recorded video responses to questions about physics. Additional multimedia in the form of images or video clips is used to supplement the synthetic tutors' video responses. As a context for interactions with the tutor, students working with the PALE complete online lesson activities organized in three-stage learning cycles. The activities focus on video observation and measurement. To evaluate the system, 22 students were interviewed. Complete participation consisted of three interviews over three weeks in the fall of 2010. Each interview was approximately 1.5 hours long. During the first hour the student worked through one of the lessons. In the last half hour, a researcher interviewed the student to explore the student's thoughts and opinions of the system and to probe their relevant physics knowledge. Themes emerging from a preliminary analysis of the interviews will be discussed.
  Footnotes: 1 This work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant numbers REC-0632587 and REC-0632657.
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EB08:

Towards the Measurement of Undergraduate Students' Physics Identity
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:25PM - 2:35PM
  Author: Geoff Potvin
Department of Engineering & Science Education, and Department of Mathematical Sciences
864-656-4320, gpotvin@clemson.edu
  Co-Author(s): Carrie Beattie, Kylie Paige
  Abstract: Prior research has found that students' attitudes toward physics, as embodied in their "physics identity," may play a strong role in their choices toward future physics course-taking and the likelihood of their choosing physics as a college major. Theoretical work in this area has identified several domains that constitute and influence physics identity; however, to date, quantitative research in this direction has not been based in an appropriate theoretical framework while establishing valid and reliable measures of relevant constructs. In the current work, we report on progress toward the establishment of a rigorously tested, theoretically grounded instrument to measure physics identity and its related subconstructs. Evidence for the reliability and validity of this instrument, including exploratory factor analyses, is provided using pilot data taken from 300 college students enrolled in one of two courses: introductory physics for physical science or life science majors.
  Footnotes: None
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EB09:

A Qualitative Investigation of Opportunities to Influence Self-Efficacy
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:35PM - 2:45PM
  Author: Vashti Sawtelle, Florida International University
305-968-9311, vashti.sawtelle@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe, Renee Michelle Goertzen, Laird H Kramer
  Abstract: Considerable research has shown a connection between self-efficacy and success in science fields. The qualitative analysis we present in this talk focuses on the development of self-efficacy, and in particular on what types of activities provide opportunities for self-efficacy to develop. We focus this discussion on the qualitative analysis of three Modeling Instruction students in a single problem-solving session and the self-efficacy experience opportunities (SEOs) that were apparent in this session. After providing evidence that SEOs are abundant throughout the problem solving session, we also qualitatively analyze a post-hoc interview with one of the students from the session. The combination of these two sessions provides evidence that the opportunities to influence self-efficacy that we have characterized are in fact sometimes taken up by some students, and have a direct influence on their self-efficacy.
  Footnotes: None
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EB10:

Student Difficulties with a Taylor Series Expansion in Statistical Mechanics
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:45PM - 2:55PM
  Author: Trevor I. Smith, University of Maine
207-581-1022, Trevor.I.Smith@umit.maine.edu
  Co-Author(s): John R. Thompson, Donald B. Mountcastle
  Abstract: One goal of physics instruction is to have students learn to make physical meaning of specific mathematical ideas, concepts and procedures, in different physical settings. We have reported on student difficulties with these connections in the contexts of integrals, total differentials, and partial derivatives in upper-division thermal and statistical physics. As part of research investigating student understanding and use of the Boltzmann factor, we are developing materials that guide students through a derivation of the Boltzmann factor that includes a Taylor series expansion of entropy. Using results from written surveys, classroom observations, and individual think-aloud and teaching interviews, we present evidence that while some students can recognize familiar expressions as Taylor expansions, students lack fluency with Taylor expansions at the level one might expect of advanced undergraduates, despite previous exposure to Taylor series expansions in both calculus and physics courses.
  Footnotes: None
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EB11:

What College Students Don't Know about Density
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:55PM - 3:05PM
  Author: DJ Wagner, Grove City College
724-301-1205, djwagner@gcc.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sam Cohen, Adam Moyer, Elizabeth Carbone
  Abstract: As part of the development of a fluid statics assessment, our research group conducted clinical interviews with students in both conceptual physics and calculus-based introductory physics courses. What were intended as "basic" questions about density quickly became a significant focus of those interviews, as only one of the eight students interviewed demonstrated a confident understanding of mass density. Questions were quickly added to the diagnostic exam given at the end of the semester, and the results confirm that many students have a poor grasp of density. In this talk, I will summarize our preliminary data and discuss future plans for the assessment and our instruction.
  Footnotes: None
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EB12:

Relationship between Students' Predicted Score and Actual Score on Class Exams
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 3:05PM - 3:15PM
  Author: N. Sanjay Rebello, Kansas State University
785-532-1612, srebello@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: It has long been known that students' self efficacy can influence their performance of assessments. I conducted a study to investigate the relationship between students' predicted performance and actual performance on five exams in a second-semester calculus-based physics class. After completion of each of the five exams during the semester, students in the class were given about 72 hours to predict their individual and class mean score on the exam. As incentive, students were offered extra credit worth 1% of the exam points for each predicted score that was correct within 1% of the actual score. I compared students' individual and mean score predictions with the actual scores to investigate the relationship between prediction accuracies and exam performance of the students. I also examined trends in the prediction accuracies of students over the five exams. I report on the results and possible implications of this study.
  Footnotes: None
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EC:

Educating the Larger Public about Science: Lessons from Public Institutions
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:15PM
  Presider: Paul Nienaber,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EC01:

Attracting the Public: Lessons from the Magnet Lab
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Panel - Jose Sanchez
Center for Integrating Research & Learning, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory
8506450033, sanchez@magnet.fsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Magnet Lab and other facilities, large and small, can provide the infrastructure that translates science research for students, teachers, and the general public. In addition, an educational programs group with science educators as staff, provides support for scientists as they expand their involvement with science outreach. CIRL addresses this mission by providing a broad range of programs at traditional and nontraditional venues: For example, K12 outreach to schools, middle school mentorships, high school internships, internships for undergraduates, internships for teachers, teacher professional development, Science Café, Barnes & Noble Science Nights, and Chick Fil A Family Nights. CIRL educators take any and all opportunities to help teachers bring real-world research into classrooms.
  Footnotes: None
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EC02:

Discovery to Understanding: The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Panel - Michael Thoennessen
National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory
5173336323, thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is a world leader in rare isotope research and education. Broadening the impact of scientific discovery and enhancing the public understanding of science are among the main objectives of the laboratory. Every year more than 4000 visitors participate in tours of the facility and we developed hands-on demonstrations for open houses and science fairs. For example, the Marble Nuclei Project offers a hands-on approach to learning about matter on the atomic and subatomic scale by comparing and contrasting different isotopes. This project helps visitors and students understand the various types of decay associated with different isotopes, and become aware of the goals of nuclear science and how it is applied in everyday situations.
  Footnotes: None
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EC03:

Physics for the Public
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Panel - Marge Bardeen
Education Office, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
6308402031, mbardeen@fnal.gov
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We probably all agree that the public should know something about the nature and value of scientific research. Through outreach and education activities, scientists can communicate understandings of the natural world and how we come to those understandings. The setting could be a library, lecture hall, museum floor, or even a book store. The experience should build understandings and relationships. The approach should involve engagement and when possible exploration. We discuss several activities for the general public from the particle physics community.
  Footnotes: None
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EC04:

Outreach from a Small Observatory
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Panel - James Conwell, Eastern Illinois University
2175816343, jconwell@eiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In the fall of 2004 the Eastern Illinois University Physics Department dedicated its new observatory. Built with student help and private donations, it has been central to the department's community outreach through its monthly open houses. More than 1600 visitors came in the year 2010 alone. Community support in 2009, during the UN International Year of Astronomy, allowed us to have a year-long celebration, centering on a lecture series, an observatory blog (EIU Astro at 240,000 visitors), and in cooperation with the art department, a museum exhibit on Art and Archeo-astronomy.
  Footnotes: None
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ED:

What Do We Know about Web 2.0?
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Presider: Robert Steiner,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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ED01:

Enhancing Introductory Student Motivation with a Major-Managed Course Blog
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 2:25PM
  Author: W. Brian Lane, Jacksonville University
904-256-7326, wlane@ju.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Students typically begin an introductory physics course without the important motivational factors of relevance and confidence, such that many students do not fully engage with learning activities. Instructional technology can provide a venue for developing student motivation by extending the classroom discussion and incorporating into the learning community outsiders at different stages along the novice-to-expert journey. To leverage these benefits, we implemented an instructional strategy that used a course blog to create a community of learners made of upper-level physics seminar students (who wrote a variety of articles for the blog) and non-major introductory physics students (who read and commented on the articles). Using various surveys (including the CLASS) and post-instruction interviews, we examine the impact of this strategy on the introductory students' senses of relevance and confidence and propose further developments of this instructional strategy.
  Footnotes: Supported by the Marilyn Repsher Center for Teaching and Learning.
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ED02:

Combining JiTT with Wikis in Physics Classrooms
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:25PM - 2:35PM
  Author: Hashini E. Mohottala, University of Hartford
860-208-3685, mohottala@hartford.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: I report the combined use of Just in Time teaching (JiTT) and Wikispace (wikis) in an introductory-level physics class. Wikis helps students, instructors and technology to interact with one another. A core element of JiTT is interactive lectures. Although these teaching tools have been used separately in physics classrooms over the years, the combination will be a new experience for both physics instructors and students. During this exercise, I carefully picked relevant physics problems and posted them on the Wikis weekly, using it as a platform for students to meet online and discuss problem solving strategies. The students were supposed to discuss and find the methods to solve the problems and not get the final answer in numerical forms. This activity helped students enhance their critical thinking abilities and as the Wiki page administrator, I was able to track all the write-ups, edits and allocate the necessary grades.
  Footnotes: None
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ED03:

Automated Analysis of Students' Responses to Short-Answer Physics Questions^1
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:35PM - 2:45PM
  Author: Christopher M. Nakamura
Kansas State University Physics Department
(785) 532-7167, cnakamur@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sytil K. Murphy, Dean A. Zollman, Michael Christel, Scott Stevens
  Abstract: Online learning environments and synthetic tutoring systems are of interest as potential resources in physics education. These systems may allow many students to study physics in interactive ways at times and in locations of their choice. To effectively promote authentic learning, these environments must be able to present students with open-ended, conceptual questions, as a tutor would. The ability to interpret and respond automatically to students' responses would increase the interactivity of these systems considerably. It would also present a powerful analysis tool to address the large data sets these systems can generate. Vector-space based methods of text indexing and lexical network approaches to text analysis may be useful for this purpose. Here we discuss work exploring these types of approaches to interpreting student responses to short-answer questions. In particular we investigate the combination of qualitative coding methods with computerized text analysis to provide robust automated interpretation of responses.
  Footnotes: 1 This work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant numbers REC-0632587 and REC-0632657.
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ED04:

Collaborative Problem Solving in the Presence of an Expert Tutor
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:45PM - 2:55PM
  Author: Brett D van de Sande, Arizona State University, CIDSE
4809657455, bvds@asu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We know that, in the right circumstances, pairs of problem solvers can work more effectively than a student working alone. In a previous lab study, we found that pairs of students, working under the direction of an expert (computer) tutor, was a particularly effective combination. We have embarked on a project to develop technology that extends this paradigm to pairs of students working remotely from one another. We discuss the status of the project and the prospects for education experiments using this new tool.
  Footnotes: None
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ED05:

Online Homework: Identifying Problem-solving Strategies and Misconceptions for Contextualized Problems
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:55PM - 3:05PM
  Author: Aaron D. Wangberg, Winona State University
507-474-5777, awangberg@winona.edu
  Co-Author(s): Nicole Engelke, Gulden Karakok
  Abstract: Students who struggle to solve problems often utilize a variety of creative solution strategies that go beyond mimicking previously worked examples. These strategies are sometimes incorrect generalizations of a particular example or invented based on superficial properties of the problem. Recently, advances in the open-source online homework system WeBWorK have allowed us to capture not only the final answer that students provide but also the work, including incorrect attempts, used to complete the problem. We will share how we have used the system to better understand and characterize how calculus students with weak understandings of function composition attempt to solve contextualized, e.g. extreme value and rate, problems in the course. In addition, we will share how we are using this information and technology to provide interactive interventions focused on these students' weaknesses.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Robyn Wangberg
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EE:

Upper Division Laboratories: Ideas, Equipment and Techniques
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 2:45PM
  Presider: Eric Ayars,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EE01:

Teaching Scientific Writing -- What I Learned from a New Approach
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 1:45PM
  Author: Invited - Brian Houser, Eastern Washington University
509-359-7005, bhouser@mail.ewu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In my most recent running of our Advanced Laboratory, I set the writing of scientific reports as a principal objective. My new approach included a class discussion of two actual papers (one published and one rejected), student comments on each others' work, and a requirement that the third and final report be subject to the refereeing process before resubmission for a grade. Though the writing abilities of the students varied widely, all showed improvement. This talk will give an overview of the course and present how students progressed in writing abstracts, procedures, and analysis sections of their papers. I will also include problems I encountered and improvements that can be made for the next offering.
  Footnotes: None
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EE02:

ALPhA's Laboratory Immersions Program -- Plunging into New Experiments
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:45PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Invited - Lowell McCann, University of Wisconsin - River Falls
715-425-3196, lowell.mccann@uwrf.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In this talk, I will report on the first two years of the Advanced Laboratory Physics Association's (ALPhA) Laboratory Immersion program. ALPhA initiated this program to help faculty and teaching staff learn new instructional-physics experiments. Each Laboratory Immersion is two to three days in length, with the entire time devoted to learning one experiment well enough to teach it confidently. I will discuss the first round of Immersions, which took place during summer 2010, and the impact these offerings have had on the participants based on the results of our preliminary evaluation. The slate of upcoming Immersions for summer 2011 will also be presented.
  Footnotes: None
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EE03:

Electron Mobility in Silicon: Surprising Facts and Temperature Dependence Determination
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 2:25PM
  Author: A. James Mallmann, Milwaukee School of Engineering
414-277-7317, mallmann@msoe.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The mobilities of the current-carrying free charges in transistors influence switching speeds, the operating temperatures, and the rate of battery drain for laptop computers and other portable electronic devices. After a brief discussion of the scattering of electrons by lattice vibrations, I will describe a simple, inexpensive experiment to determine how the mobility of free electrons in lightly doped n-type silicon depends on temperature.
  Footnotes: None
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EE04:

The Radio Astronomy Laboratory: Another Way to Learn Physics and Astronomy
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:25PM - 2:35PM
  Author: Victor Migenes, Brigham Young University
(801) 422-2233, vmigenes@byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Daniel Blakley
  Abstract: The field of Radio Astronomy was founded essentially by unemployed military radar engineers after World War II. Radar research had left unanswered questions and unsolved problems. The 1950-60s saw a big growth in the design and construction of radio antennas by universities and private laboratories. In the 1970-80s new developments in the area of interferometric radio astronomy and synthesis arrays created instruments that increased the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the observations. National Laboratories was born. The 1990s radio interferometry added baselines to a radio antenna in Earth orbit. New exciting instruments and opportunities will be available in 2015-2020 such as ALMA and SKA. National observatories in the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Japan (among other countries) offer wonderful opportunities to conduct research, in basically all the research fields known, with the latest technology available. Radio Astronomy is an interesting and exciting way to teach physics and astronomy concepts to intermediate and upper-level undergraduate students and even graduate students. It also offers the opportunity for "hands-on" experience in research. Setting up a small Radio Astronomy laboratory is an easy and cheap way to expose K-12 students to physics and astronomy, and research work. We present our efforts, so far, in establishing a Radio Astronomy Laboratory at Brigham Young University and involving undergraduate and graduate students in class and research work.
  Footnotes: None
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EE05:

Relativistic Electron Experiment for the Advanced Laboratory
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:35PM - 2:45PM
  Author: Michael F. Vineyard, Union College
518-388-8353, vineyarm@union.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We have developed an advanced laboratory experiment at Union College to make independent measurements of the momentum and kinetic energy of relativistic electrons from a beta source. The momentum measurements are made with a magnetic spectrometer and a silicon surface-barrier detector is used to measure the kinetic energy. A plot of the kinetic energy as a function of momentum compared to the classical and relativistic predictions clearly shows the relativistic nature of the electrons. Accurate values for the rest mass of the electron and the speed of light are also extracted from the data. I will describe the experimental apparatus, discuss the analysis, and present some results.
  Footnotes: None
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EF:

Reforming the Introductory Physics Course for Life Science Majors V
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:15PM
  Presider: Juan Burciaga,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EF01:

Taking a Biologist to Lunch
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 1:35PM
  Author: Invited - Dawn C. Meredith, University of New Hampshire
603-862-2063, dawn.meredith@unh.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jessica A. Bolker, James Vesenka, Christopher W Shubert, Gertrud L. Kraut
  Abstract: It is often suggested that instructors of algebra-based introductory physics courses take a biologist to lunch, with the goal of finding out what a practicing biologist needs to know about physics. We sat down with faculty from several different life sciences at our institution to find out what physics their students need: a microbiologist, a zoologist, a kinesiologist, a physiologist, and a geneticist. We will share what we learned from these articulation cross-disciplinary conversations. One need expressed by biology faculty was for physics problems that have significant biology context and content; we have developed problems to address this need. A second need is for lecture modules from our IPLS course that biology instructors can use to refresh students' memories of specific physics content. This enables the students to apply those physics principles in specific biological contexts and build upon what they learned in the IPLS course.
  Footnotes: None
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EF02:

Reforming Physics for Biologists and Pre-Meds: Disciplinary Barriers
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:35PM - 1:55PM
  Author: Invited - Edward F. Redish, University of Maryland
301-405-6120, redish@umd.edu
  Co-Author(s): Todd J. Cooke, Wolfang Losert, Karen Carleton
  Abstract: The calls from the biology and medical communities for reform of undergraduate biology education [1] requests that support courses be reformed as well. At the University of Maryland, the Physics and Biology Education Research Groups [2] have been discussing these issues and interviewing students in physics and biology classes. We find that adapting physics classes for biology students and including physics in biology classes is going to be harder than it appears on the surface. There are epistemological differences in the way both students and professionals in biology and physics think about their science, differences in the way they use math, and differences in the way they think about fundamental concepts. These differences create barriers to reform. Additional barriers arise when chemists and mathematicians are included. Bridging these disciplinary barriers to create effective reform is going to require creativity, open minds, and a willingness to communicate.
  Footnotes: [1] http://umdberg.pbworks.com/w/page/27519347/Documents-on-Biology-Education-Reform [2] http://www.physics.umd.edu/perg/; http://umdberg.pbworks.com/w/page/8039417/FrontPage
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EF03:

Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences and the Revised MCAT
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:55PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Invited - Robert C. Hilborn, University of Texas at Dallas
972-883-4726, rhilborn@utdallas.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Association of American Medical Colleges is in the process of reviewing and revising the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) with the expectation that the new exam will go "live" in 2014 or 2015. At the same time, the AAMC Committee on Admissions has recommended that medical schools drop the traditional course requirements and replace them with a list of competencies: what entering medical students should know and be able to do, particularly in the natural and mathematical sciences. I will review the current status of the MCAT revision and discuss how changes in the MCAT and in admissions requirements for medical schools may affect introductory physics courses for the life sciences.
  Footnotes: None
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EF04:

IPLS at Appalachian State University
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Patricia E. Allen, Appalachian State University
828-262-2989, allenpe@appstate.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: At Appalachian State University, a new IPLS (Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences) course is currently being piloted with 21 students. In consultation with various on-campus pre-professional health-care programs, the author attempts to integrate the BIO2010 and SFFP recommendations with existing departmental resources to generate a course appropriate for future health-care professionals. For example, the overarching topic for the first semester course is ultrasound imaging, diathermy, and surgery, while defibrillators and diagnostic imaging (MRI, CT, etc) are used for the second semester. The roles of physics, physiology, and materials are introduced into the course as they are needed. The presentation will include course topics (including the order of coverage), resources for lecture and lab, and preliminary student performance for the pilot course. In addition, some of the issues associated with scaling up this type of course will be discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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EF05:

Project-based Learning of Biomechanics
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Nancy Beverly, Mercy College
914-674-7275, nbeverly@mercy.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Life and health science students taking the first semester of the algebra-based introductory physics course at Mercy College learn mechanics in the context of biomechanics through a semester-long project analyzing a human or animal motion of their choice. As each topic is explored in class, students apply that topic to their analysis. Kinematics, Newton's laws, rotation and torque, momentum, energy, heat and temperature, elasticity, and fluids are applied at different levels depending on the project. Students take data from force plates, goniometers, accelerometers, force sensors, motion sensors, and video analysis, to incorporate into their projects. Students are required to post updates to their projects online and to comment on each other's work in progress. Guidelines, rubrics, and student examples will be shown.
  Footnotes: None
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EF07:

A Hybrid Lecture-Studio Implementation at Boston University
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Andrew Duffy, Department of Physics, Boston University
508 5234135, aduffy@bu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Manher Jariwala
  Abstract: Boston University has a new internal grant, sponsored by the provost, called RULE - Reforming the Undergraduate Learning Experience. The Department of Physics has received a RULE grant, and is using the funds to implement an experimental studio section of our algebra-based introductory physics class that is taken primarily by life science majors. That section will begin in a new 63-student classroom in fall 2010. To prepare for this implementation, in May and June 2010, the summer version of the course was taught in a hybrid lecture-studio format, with the lecture component having a number of interactive engagement features. In this poster, we will report on our experience with the hybrid format.
  Footnotes: None
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EF08:

Introduction to Medical Physics for Physics Majors and Biophysics Minors
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Michael G. Nichols, Creighton University
402-280-2159, mnichols@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This course was developed for undergraduate students interested in the life sciences who would otherwise take only the required two-semester general physics sequence. The primary goal of this writing-intensive course is to develop a functional understanding of the physical principles on which many medical techniques and technologies are based. This includes radioactivity, the interaction of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation with living tissue, the physical mechanisms whereby radiation induces cell damage, biophysical cell survival models, and the principles of radiation treatment. In addition to this, students are introduced to medical imaging technologies including X-ray CT, SPECT, PET, MRI and Ultrasound. This is done both in the classroom and through tours of local hospitals. Altogether, these applications encourage students to extend and deepen their understanding of physics while illustrating how a little interdisciplinary ingenuity can lead to the development of medical technologies that can profoundly improve the quality of life.
  Footnotes: None
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EF09:

From Brownian Motion to Random Walks: Diffusion in the IPLS Class
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Mark Reeves, George Washington University
2029946279, reevesme@gwu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Carl Pearson, Rahul Simha, Robert Donaldson
  Abstract: Diffusion and entropy are very important for understanding biophysical processes at the cellular level, but students have and maintain very strong misconceptions about these two topics. We have developed a first-semester IPLS course, in which roughly 1/3 of the class time is dedicated to teaching statistical physics. Students are introduced to statistics by considering simple coins flips. We move on from these to large numbers of coins and flips per coin and thereby to a meaningful physical model by connecting to Java-based simulations of the random walk problem. The class discussions and simulations are complemented by laboratories in which diffusion, Brownian motion, and laser trapping are directly observed and quantitatively measured. From the measurements and in-class discussions, the connection is made between the microscopic model/observation and its macroscopic realization. That is we connect by modeling and experiment Brownian motion to diffusion. The same line of argument is used to establish the equipartition theorem in terms of observations of laser trapping and this is then extended to discussions of protein folding and membrane formation. In this way the entire suite of hydrophobic forces are shown to have their origin in statistical models for entropy in thermodynamics.
  Footnotes: This research is supported by the NSF/CCLI program. More information can be found at http://www.phys.gwu.edu/iplswiki/index.php/Example_Courses
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EF10:

Teaching Introductory Physics with Biomedical Applications
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Natalia Schkolnikov, Hampton University
7577275824, natalia.schkolnikov@hamptonu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Often students from underrepresented groups in the biomedical sciences feel disconnected from physics. We report on some of our experiences teaching the introductory physics sequence for biology and pharmacy students at Hampton University. Since fundamental concepts of physics are central to an understanding of biomedical sciences, we include biomedical applications in most topics of the courses. In particular, the biological and medical fields are an ideal source of physics problems. We discuss how fast an animal can walk or run, how long a cardiac pacemaker can work, and how electrical signals travel along neurons. We cover various methods that are used to "look inside the body" such as ultrasound, MRI, and X-ray imaging. Encouraged by the opening of the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute in 2010, we discuss how energetic protons could provide an efficient cancer treatment. My experience shows that students find all these discussions stimulating and helpful.
  Footnotes: None
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EF11:

Concept Mapping to Clarify Interdisciplinary Themes: An Example Using Osmosis
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Ji Shen, University of Georgia
706-542-4646, ji.shen1221@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Craig C. Wiegert, Shannon Sung, Georgia Hodges
  Abstract: Boundaries between traditional academic disciplines often hinder students from integrating "big ideas" across subjects. In response to the growing need for college-level interdisciplinary education, we have assembled a diverse team of educators and education researchers (in physics, biology, physiology, and other STEM subjects) to investigate student understanding of interdisciplinary science topics. Important early steps in this project include identifying the pivotal concepts associated with a given topic, and developing a common understanding of the discipline-specific explanations of these concepts. We illustrate these steps applied to the topic of osmosis, a phenomenon often poorly understood by students and educators alike. We share our results in creating several iterations of an "expert" group concept map for osmosis. This collaborative process highlights different and often imprecise use of terminology; the challenges of developing an accurate common model; and several problems in understanding and communicating the underlying physical mechanism of selective diffusion.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Craig Wiegert.
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EF12:

What Do We Want Our Life Science Majors to Learn?
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Guofen Yu, The University of Findlay
(419) 434-4493, yu@findlay.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The majority of students in my Introductory Physics Lecture course lack the interest in physics and the learning skills for science courses. Both my students and I struggled in the course when I first started teaching life science majors after years of teaching engineering students. Through this experience, I have come to realize that it is extremely important to set up appropriate overarching course goals (such as the skills I want students to develop) and make content objectives for each chapter to maximize life science applications. My pedagogical methods, topic selections, depth of discussions on each topic, class examples, homework assignments, and assessments are all built upon the course goals and chapter objectives. A list of my course goals and the pedagogical reforms in my course will be reported as part of this session. Data of students' performance and comments from online anonymous surveys over several semesters will also be presented.
  Footnotes: None
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EF13:

Making Physics Lab Relevant to the Life Science Major
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Poster - Rona Ramos, Yale University, Department of Physics
(203) 432-3655, rona.ramos@yale.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sidney Cahn, Stephen Irons
  Abstract: In current biological and biomedical research, the connections between the life sciences and the physical sciences are deepening. Increasingly, the methods of research and analysis in these fields depend on sophisticated instruments with strong roots in the physical sciences. However, many premedical and life science students feel their undergraduate physics courses are irrelevant to their chosen field. The Yale Physics Department has responded to these concerns by making major changes to the introductory laboratory courses for life science and premedical students. This talk will highlight some of the innovative demos and instructional laboratory experiments that have been developed to address this issue. Other changes include presenting lab experiments in the context of current biomedical and biophysical applications. Preliminary feedback suggests that students are more engaged and feel the laboratory course is more appropriate to the training of future life scientists and physicians.
  Footnotes: None
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EG:

The Art and Science of Teaching
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 2:45PM
  Presider: Ray A. Burnstein,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EG01:

Doing Your Best with the Class You're Given: Efforts to Intellectually Engage General Education Science Students in a Mega-Course
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 1:45PM
  Author: Invited - Edward Prather
Center for Astronomy Education - University of Arizona
520-405-0974, eprather@as.arizona.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: At the University of Arizona, members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) are working to create effective interactive learning environments in general education Earth and Space Science courses with enrollments as large as 1200 students. Which research-validated instructional strategies still work in these mega courses? What educational resources are needed and how do you facilitate learning? These are two of the questions that are driving our group of educators and researchers to explore the boundaries of the "Art and Science of Teaching." Examples of interactive learning strategies we use, the pedagogical issues we face, and the results on the effectiveness of these courses will be presented (1,2). (1) Prather, E. E., Rudolph, A. L., & Brissenden, G. (2009) Teaching and learning astronomy in the 21st century, Physics Today, 62(10). (2) This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS)
  Footnotes: None
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EG02:

Teaching Physics Using and Misusing Groups
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:45PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Invited - Kenneth Heller
School of Physics and Astronomy/University of Minnesota
612 6247314, heller@physics.umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Teaching physics has always involved students working in groups. In labs students traditionally worked together, usually in groups of two. Students often formed study groups outside of class to do difficult assignments or study for high-stakes tests. Today, many research-validated modes of teaching depend on students working together. There is even a continuing pressure from employers to graduate students who have the skills to collaborate productively. Nevertheless, many teachers and students do not have beneficial experiences when classes involve group work. This talk will outline the utility of group work based on research-backed learning theory and discuss some common practices that can enhance or destroy that utility.
  Footnotes: None
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EG03:

Responsive Teaching and the Beginnings of Energy Ideas in Third Grade (1)
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 2:45PM
  Author: Invited - Fred Goldberg, San Diego State University
619-405-5158, fgoldberg@sciences.sdsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: As part of a project aimed at describing children's progress in their science inquiry and in their development of energy (and other) ideas we have been working with grade 3-6 teachers to help them change their teaching from focusing on achieving specific district or state standards to focusing on responding to their students' ideas and reasoning. This change in focus has coincided with teachers seeing science inquiry as a pursuit of coherent, mechanistic accounts of phenomena (2). In this talk I will use some examples from third-grade classrooms to illustrate how this new focus has promoted the emergence of energy ideas.
  Footnotes: (1) Supported in part by NSF Grant Number 0732233 -- Learning Progressions for Scientific Inquiry: A Model Implementation in the Context of Energy. (2) Hammer, D., Russ, R., Scherr, R. E., & Mikeska, J. (2008). Identifying inquiry and conceptualizing students? abilities. In R. A. Duschl & R. E. Grandy (Eds.), Teaching scientific inquiry: Recommendations for research and Implementation (pp. 138-156). Rotterdam, NL: Sense Publishers.
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EH:

Research on Student Learning of Energy
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:15PM
  Presider: Paula Heron,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EH01:

Speciation of Energy Concepts through Speech and Gesture in Interaction
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 1:45PM
  Author: Invited - Hunter G. Close, Seattle Pacific University
2062867259, hclose@spu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Rachel E. Scherr
  Abstract: When energy is added to a liquid to evaporate it, what is the form of energy in the gas? Is it thermal energy, which is indicated by temperature? Is it chemical energy, which is indicated by chemical composition of a substance [1]? Maybe something else? In a summer professional development course in the Energy Project [2] at Seattle Pacific University, secondary teachers posed this question while cooperating in Energy Theater [3] in order to figure out the energy transfers and transformations in a real refrigerator. Their negotiation of the name of this form of energy boiled down to a discussion of the difference between kinetic and potential energy. We show how the speech and gesture that mediated the negotiation display different levels of distinction of energy concepts among the teachers, and we suggest how dynamic refinement, or "speciation," of these concepts might be promoted strategically in instruction.
  Footnotes: [1] http://www.project2061.org/publications/bsl/online/index.php [2] Supported in part by NSF DRL 0822342 [3] Scherr, R. E., Close, H. G., McKagan, S. B., & Close, E. W. (2010) ?Energy Theater?: Using the body symbolically to understand energy. In C. Singh, M. Sabella, & S. Rebello (Eds.) 2010 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings. Melville, NY: AIP Press.
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EH02:

Cultivating Energy Conceptual Resources for Productive Reasoning
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:45PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Invited - Eric Brewe, Florida International University
305-348-3507, eric.brewe@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The conceptual resources related to energy in the typical introductory physics curriculum are inadequate for robust analysis of energy. In this talk, I describe the implementation, in the context of a Modeling Instruction university physics course, of a curricular framework designed to promote the development and use of conceptual resources for analyzing physical phenomena. The curricular framework involves both a reorganization of the content of introductory physics as well as a renewed focus on energy. Reorganizing includes treating energy early and spiraling back to energy treatments. The refocusing includes emphasizing energy's role in modeling phenomena and attending to the tools for representing energy conservation, storage, and transfer. Qualitative evidence is presented showing student use of energy conceptual resources that are promoted in the curricular implementation.
  Footnotes: None
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EH03:

A Teaching Proposal about Energy for Students Aged 11-14
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 2:45PM
  Author: Invited - Nikos Papadouris
Learning in Science Group, University of Cyprus
+35799530649, npapa@ucy.ac.cy
  Co-Author(s): Costas P. Constantinou
  Abstract: Teaching about energy is an inherently complex and challenging task, especially in the elementary and middle school. We briefly discuss the epistemological barriers that tend to perplex attempts to introduce energy and we propose an alternative teaching approach, for students aged 11-14, that seeks to provide a means for bypassing or overcoming those obstacles. This approach rests on the premise that the elaboration of energy could be more usefully framed in an epistemologically oriented, rather than a conceptually oriented, context. The emphasis in this approach is placed on (a) helping students appreciate that, in science, we invent theories in order to account for observations and (b) guiding them to elaborate energy as a theoretical framework for interpreting changes in physical systems. In the concluding part, we discuss the potential effectiveness of this teaching approach on the basis of empirical data on students' learning gains, collected through implementation in three sixth-grade classes.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Paula Heron
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EH04:

The Problem with Systems: Factors Underlying Student Difficulties with Energy
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:45PM - 3:15PM
  Author: Invited - Beth A. Lindsey, Penn State Greater Allegheny
412-675-9148, bal23@psu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The first law of thermodynamics states that doing work on an otherwise isolated system will cause its energy to change. A set of curricular materials1 has been developed, designed to help students interpret and apply the relation between work and energy, but many difficulties persist even after targeted instruction. This persistence may be related to a failure to choose an appropriate system of interest and identify the interactions of that system with its environment. I will present data on student thinking about systems, and the connection to student thinking about energy in contexts from introductory mechanics and beyond. Data presented will be from pre-tests, post-tests, and video recordings of classroom interactions and one-on-one interviews at three institutions of differing sizes and student populations.
  Footnotes: 1Tutorials in Introductory Physics, Lillian C. McDermott, Peter S. Shaffer, and the Physics Education Group, Preliminary Second Edition, Pearson Education, Inc. (2009)
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EI:

Physics Education Research Around the World II
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 2:15PM
  Presider: Genaro Zavala,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EI01:

High School Students Formalize the Quantum Concepts
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 1:45PM
  Author: Invited - Alberto Stefanel, University of Udine
++39 432 5582 28, alberto.stefanel@uniud.it
  Co-Author(s): Marisa Michelini, Lorenzo Santi
  Abstract: Almost a century after its formulation, whether and how to teach quantum mechanics in high schools is still open. Focusing on the construction of theoretical thinking, we built an educational proposal following a Dirac approach. The polarized light phenomenology is the context for the foundation of the superposition principle and its main consequences. Extensive literature shows that the main learning knots are just these basic concepts and the probabilistic interpretation of its formal representation. Several studies have been conducted on students' learning processes during research-based experimentations in 14 classes with 340 high school students. A case study, carried out by means of tutorials, audio-recordings, tests, and data acquisition, aimed at analyzing students' approach to the formalism. We individuated three ways to consider formalism: physical, when it acquired meaning through a link to physical processes; geometrical, when a geometrical lecture is given; and conceptual/descriptive, when it is translated in words/sentences.
  Footnotes: I'm a member of AAPT My sponsor is: Dr. Genaro Zavala Enríquez
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EI02:

Physics Education Research in Canada
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:45PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Invited - Tetyana Antimirova, Ryerson University
1 (416) 979 5000 x 7416, antimiro@ryerson.ca
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: One may ask why there are only a few Physics Education Research groups in Canada, unlike in the U.S., Europe, Australia, or Latin America, where PER has blossomed. The main reason is the virtual absence of PER funding at the national and provincial levels. As a result, graduate programs in PER cannot be established. Another problem that hinders the development of PER in Canada is a deep disconnect between the Physics Departments and Faculties of Education. Almost all PER initiatives in Canada today happen despite the lack of sustainable PER funding. These efforts are initiated by the individuals, small groups, and some universities, resulting in a patchwork of short-term PER research projects. I will provide a few case studies of recent successful PER-related initiatives in Canada. Despite the difficulties we face, PER movement in Canada is building slowly from the ground up. However, the long-term future of PER in Canada remains uncertain.
  Footnotes: None
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EJ:

Recruiting Students to High School Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 3:05PM
  Presider: Gary White,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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EJ01:

Recruiting Strategies for High School Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:15PM - 1:45PM
  Author: Invited - Mike Kennedy
Neuqua Valley High School/U.S. Department of Energy
815-325-0917, mike_kennedy@ipsd.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: There is a need to increase the number of students that take physics in high school, especially when you consider the President's national goal of preparing all students in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) subjects. The success of students in the 21st century workforce will depend on students' education in the STEM fields and in many cases their exposure to physics. While at Neuqua Valley High School in Naperville, IL, I have helped to create a large interest in the physics courses. When I started at Neuqua Valley 10 years ago, I only had nine students in one section of AP Physics. This year there are five full sections of AP Physics that are taught by three teachers. To meet the student demand for physics courses at all levels, we have doubled our physics teaching staff from five teachers to 10 teachers during my tenure at Neuqua Valley. Come learn some strategies that will help you recruit students to your physics classes.
  Footnotes: None
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EJ02:

Why Am I Here? The Development of a Physics Identity through Meaningful High School Physics Experiences
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 1:45PM - 2:15PM
  Author: Invited - Zahra Hazari
Clemson University, Department of Engineering & Science Education
864-656-4317, zahra@clemson.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk addresses the ways in which high school physics experiences shape students' physics identities and their subsequent persistence, particularly for females and underrepresented minorities. The framework for this work is based upon the concept of a physics identity that is shaped by individuals' performance, competence, interest, and recognition by others. The talk will include results from multiple research studies, including a large national survey study and focused case studies of successful physics teachers (NSF Grant No. 0952460 and 0624444). In particular, the discussion will examine the link between physics identity and physics-related career choices, identify high school physics experiences that quantitatively predict physics identity development, and examine qualitatively what these strategies look like in the classrooms of successful high school physics teachers.
  Footnotes: None
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EJ03:

One Mad Man's Campus Campaigns
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:15PM - 2:25PM
  Author: Dean Baird, Rio Americano High School
916-607-9104, dean@phyz.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In good times you should advertise, in bad times you must. As the son of an advertiser and a marketer, I have always valued advertising as a recruitment tool. As a high school physics teacher, I have been motivated to maintain or increase my "market share" each year. I have used "dog and pony shows," personalized direct mail campaigns, and a variety of flyer and poster designs. I will detail the relative efficacy of the various campaigns and share specific designs and slogans I have used over the years.
  Footnotes: http://homepage.mac.com/phyzman/NTW/flyers.html
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EJ04:

Can Math Oriented Physics Classes Really Increase Your Number of Students?
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:25PM - 2:35PM
  Author: Donald G. Franklin, Retired
404-401-3844, dgfrank1@aol.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: With 27 years of high school physics experience in five states, which includes eight years of private school, I have a lot of information with which to build my model. Using math as the major emphasis can only work if there is constant review. This can be done by using a textbook or online homework. Here is where they differ: Online homework does away with copying down someone's answers as they are not yours. The teacher becomes a conceptual teacher so that students can solve their problems. Getting the students to follow the problem solving format is the hardest part. Constant review: Giving the same problems to the entire class and then testing them on the new material and review material every week to two weeks allows for students to make up for their mistakes, which they feel they can show that they have learned the material rather than cramming material for the test.
  Footnotes: None
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EJ05:

The Peer Pressure of Student Physics Commercials
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:35PM - 2:45PM
  Author: Elizabeth (Tommi) C. Holsenbeck, Alabama State University
334-229-4776, eholsenbeck@alasu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Alabama Section of AAPT is attempting to have current high school physics students influence their younger peers with an advertising campaign. The First Annual Physics Commercial Competition will be held in the fall of 2011. It is funded by the Alabama Section of AAPT, Huntingdon College, and small donations from members and other interested parties. AMSTI (Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative)/Science in Motion Physics Specialists developed the contest and will take the leadership role in administering it. An added dimension comes from a co-sponsor, Huntingdon College. Their college physics students will create sample commercials to use as a guide and be in teachers' hands by spring 2011. A unique perspective will come from these college students as they look in hindsight at their high school physics experience or non-experience. The hope for Alabama public schools is physics classes' enrollment will increase in 2012-13.
  Footnotes: None
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EJ06:

The Amazing World of Physics (and Science), Demonstrated to Students by Students
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:45PM - 2:55PM
  Author: Stacia M. Kelly,
712 389-0905, kellys@lawton-bronson.k12.ia.us
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This year marks the fifth Annual Physics Show hosted by students in my high school course. Originally implemented as an alternative summative assessment tool, the Physics Show has become an anticipated event for our district's fifth and sixth grade students. Physics students collaborate as teams in and out of class, abiding by specific guidelines and pre-determined timelines, to generate and perform a Physics "Magic" Show at the end of the academic year. The show is judged by faculty members based upon several criteria, including the Physics students' ability to clarify phenomena in an age-appropriate, yet accurate explanation. Examples of guidelines, judging rubrics and student demonstrations will be provided.
  Footnotes: Jeff Morgan from University of Northern Iowa
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EJ07:

Campaign for Recruiting Students to High School Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 2:55PM - 3:05PM
  Author: Melissa A. Lapps, AAPT
301-209-3626, mlapps@aapt.org
  Co-Author(s): Gabe Popkin, Marilyn Gardner
  Abstract: The Why Physics? campaign is a joint effort between AAPT, the American Physical Society and the Society of Physics Students to help high school physics teachers recruit students, and to inform students, parents, and guidance counselors about the many benefits of taking a physics course. The campaign includes the "Why Physics?" poster and the "7 Myths About High School Physics" brochure. In addition, we are designing a large part of our campaign around enlisting and empowering physics teachers to be strong advocates for physics in their schools. In this talk I will briefly describe our campaign, and share some of the strategies for success that we have learned from teachers around the country.
  Footnotes: None
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PC:

Millikan Medal and AAPT Teaching Awards
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 10:30AM - 12:15PM
  Presider: David Cook,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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PC01:

All I Really Need to Know About Physics Education I Learned in Kindergarten
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 10:30AM - 12:15PM
  Author: Plenary - Brian Jones,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We learn by doing. To learn physics, our students must be active, perform investigations, solve problems, and communicate with their peers. The same is true of teaching. We learn by doing, and my work with the Little Shop of Physics program has given me invaluable practice as a physics teacher. For 20 years I have worked with a team of undergraduate students and fellow educators to present this unique hands-on science program to over 250,000 K-12 students. We have worked with students of all ages and all backgrounds, in schools all over the region and the world. Along the way, we have developed effective tools to teach scientific concepts and we have learned useful techniques to engage students. We have traded ideas and insights with thousands of teachers. Going on the road with the Little Shop of Physics takes me out of my classroom, and I return a much better teacher for it. I will share some techniques, some insights, and (of course) some demonstrations that I have developed with my Little Shop colleagues over the past 20 years.
  Footnotes: None
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PC02:

Blond Girls Can't Learn Physics
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 10:30AM - 12:15PM
  Author: Plenary - Stacy McCormack,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: At the age of six, Stacy McCormack told her entire family that one day she would become a science teacher. Trained as a high school chemistry teacher, she was fearful of making the transition to teaching physics because of her own fear of physics--but the pleading of her students convinced her to make the switch. As she worked toward her graduate degree, one professor in particular made it especially awkward when he remarked I'll tell you right now, because you're a girl and have blond hair, you'll never understand physics. Stacy designed a guided-inquiry style high school physics class at Penn High School in Mishawaka, IN, that is lab-driven, student-centered, and uses numerous formative assessments to guide student learning. Now the 2011 Indiana State Teacher of the Year and an online adjunct instructor of Astronomy, Physics, and Physical Science classes for Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend, IN, Stacy shares her inexpensively created labs in a book for physics teachers titled "Teacher Friendly Physics." Amazingly, each year hundreds of high school students now find success in physics under the guidance of a blond girl.
  Footnotes: None
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PC03:

Teaching Space Science: A STEM Transformation Vehicle That Really Works
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 10:30AM - 12:15PM
  Author: Plenary - Edward Prather,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: From assembly line worker to tenured faculty member, a struggle and journey that has made me hungry to help. Over the past decade I have worked closely with hundreds of college instructors, postdocs, graduate students, and undergrads in collaborative projects designed to understand issues of teaching and learning in college-level general education space science courses. The research results from these collaborations have been used to transform classrooms all over the country. We are creating learning environments that can significantly impact learners' science literacy and engagement in STEM for the 250,000 students that take these courses each year. By moving students along the continuum from non-science major, to peer instructor, to degree seeking student, we are creating the next generation's Ambassadors of Science.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2:

  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:45PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A01:

Students' Retention and Transfer of Problem Solving through Modeling Activities
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Bijaya Aryal, University of Minnesota-Rochester
5072588216, baryal@umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The development of students' problem solving skills has been considered one of the major challenges in physics instruction. This study examined the effect of modeling activities on retention and transfer of problem solving skills. An instructional method was designed to help students make connections among ideas learned from various areas to solve physics problems. The method used plan-search-execute (PSE) as three stages of problem solving strategy. The students were expected to represent complex physics problems with simple physical models. The problem solving activity was integrated with abstractly related hands-on activities. Finally, to assess whether or not the students retained and transferred the desired skills, they were asked to solve new sets of related contextual physics problems individually. The results showed a positive influence of modeling activities on student retention of problem solving. The transfer was noticeable only when the modeling activities and related hands-on activities were appropriately sequenced.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A03:

Measurements of Students' Performance on Computational Exercises in Introductory Mechanics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Marcos D. Caballero, Georgia Institute of Technology
770-827-3185, caballero@gatech.edu
  Co-Author(s): Matthew A. Kohlmyer, Michael F Schatz
  Abstract: The impact of laboratory and homework exercises on the development of computational thinking is evaluated using a proctored end-of-course computational exercise. We present the motivation for and development of this proctored assignment, an analysis of erroneous student code, and the implications for teaching computation to introductory physics students.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A04:

Turning the Tables: Letting Middle Schoolers Teach College Students Science
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Jon D. H. Gaffney, University of Kentucky
(724)601-5936, jon.gaffney@uky.edu
  Co-Author(s): Paul Broderson
  Abstract: Seventh graders at a local, low-income serving middle school developed instructional presentations for simple natural phenomena such as acid/base reactions and crushing soft drink cans. Typically, they share these interactive lessons with elementary school students. However, I invited them to turn the tables on my students, elementary education majors enrolled in a required physics course during the spring of 2011. The 7th graders taught their lessons to the future teachers, demonstrating an energizing confidence and enthusiasm. The activities encouraged the pre-service teachers to think about science in new ways, and many even reported the visit as being their favorite day of class. Hopefully, we will be able to capture and build upon that enthusiasm. In the future, we intend more reciprocal visits, where the middle school students get to both teach and learn physics lessons from the university students.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A05:

Verification of the Gravitational Equivalence Principles Using Video Modeling
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Carolina Galvis, Grupo de Física / Gimnasio La Montaña
6761861, grupofisica@glm.edu.co
  Co-Author(s): Mauricio Mendivelso-Villaquirán
  Abstract: Some gravitational experiments need special conditions that are not available in the classroom (i.e. low friction, low air drag force or absence of gravitational field). Following video analysis by Persson and Hagen (Phys. Educ. 46,12) we verify the weak equivalence principle in our classroom. In addition, we verify the strong equivalence principle using the same technique and a low-cost experimental setup.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A06:

What Is a Quantum?
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Art Hobson, University of Arkansas
479-575-5918, ahobson@uark.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Electrons, photons, etc., are field quanta, yet we continue to teach students that they are particles, thus making quantum physics into a topic that's not only difficult but, much worse, logically inconsistent. An elementary field quantum is a discrete, spatially extended, highly unified, bundle of field energy. Quantum field theorists understand that "particles" are quanta of various fields. The Schroedinger equation describes nonrelativistic material field quanta. But this understanding has not seeped through to most teachers and so students are stuck with all sorts of wave-particle paradoxes. How can particles exhibit all these extended, non-local effects? Not only these paradoxes, but such vacuum phenomena as the Lamb shift and Casimir effect, testify to the primacy of a field picture. This poster presents a simple method of teaching these fundamentals, along with supporting statements by Maxwell, Einstein, Weinberg, and Robert Mills.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A07:

Engaging Non-STEM Majors in Authentic Problem Solving
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Daniel Loranz, Truckee Meadows Community College
775-673-8252, dloranz@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: "PHYS 117: Intro to Space Science and Engineering" is a new course at Truckee Meadows Community College developed specifically to engage non-STEM majors in authentic problem solving. In this course, students earn science credits by completing hands-on projects in high-altitude ballooning, lighter-than-air vehicles, rocketry, and robotics. All course projects pose legitimate and unsolved problems that require students to balance multiple competing constraints in the search for optimal solutions. And each project takes students through a complete cycle of i) Design/Build, ii) Deploy/Evaluate, and iii) Reflect/Report.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A08:

Assessing Learning Beyond Content
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Gina Merys, Creighton University
402-280-3918, gmm89957@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jay Leighter, Theresa Edmonds, Michael Cherney
  Abstract: Introductory undergraduate education in physics frequently involves large classroom instruction and the assessment of student learning using content- and skill-based tests. This is not the case in certain other disciplines. (It is also not the case in workshop-type courses or in physics research experiences.) The development of an interdisciplinary program in Energy Studies created the need for non-traditional evaluation techniques that could be used in a project-based curriculum. These assessment methods draw on the best practices in English, Communication Studies, Engineering and Physics. The methods developed have applicability to the measurement of life-long learning skills, teamwork skills, and innovation ability as well as for the assessment of content knowledge and problem solving skills.
  Footnotes: This work is supported by the United States Department of Energy. Sponsored by Michael Cherney.
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PST2A09:

Student Use and Perception of Tablet PCs; Are They Helpful?
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Charles A. Parker, Colorado School of Mines
970-689-9015, cparker@mines.edu
  Co-Author(s): Zachary T. Boerner, Vincent H. Kuo, Susan E. Kowalksi, Frank V. Kowalski
  Abstract: Research shows that learning is more effective when students are actively interacting with the professor and each other. To facilitate these interactions, the Technology in the Classroom Committee (TICC) at the Colorado School of Mines provides Tablet PCs to physics students in selected courses each semester. These Tablet PCs are used in conjunction with the InkSurvey tool, which allows for real-time feedback in the classroom. The Tablet PCs also allow for sophisticated student collaboration using notetaking software, providing a means for note sharing. In our poster, we explore how the Tablet PCs have been used in the physics classrooms at CSM and present preliminary data on student perceptions of having the Tablet PCs.
  Footnotes: Sponsor: Vincent H. Kuo
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PST2A10:

Concept-Mapping Mechanics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Andrew Pawl, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
608-342-6160, pawla@uwplatt.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: One reason that introductory mechanics is a required course in many disciplines is that it has a very narrow focus but a very rich conceptual structure. Students of mechanics are expected to see the flexibility that is gained by developing many different descriptions for the same physical process (e.g. the motion of an object under the influence of gravity). Unfortunately, physics education research suggests that most students fail to appreciate this central aspect of the curriculum and instead view kinematics, momentum, and energy as completely separate ideas. Used properly, a concept map can be an ideal means of communicating the structure of physics to students. In this poster, we present a novel approach to designing a concept map for mechanics and indicate how student use of this tool can be tracked and studied.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A11:

Fostering Computational Thinking: Computer Modeling Homework in Introductory Mechanics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Michael F. Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology
(678) 500-9133, michael.schatz@physics.gatech.edu
  Co-Author(s): Marcos D. Caballero, John B Burk, Matthew A Kohlmyer
  Abstract: Introductory physics courses typically fail to provide students with significant opportunities to use a computer to solve science and engineering problems. We present an overview of recent work to develop laboratory and homework exercises on numerical modeling, simulation, and visualization for students in introductory mechanics in both high school and large enrollment university courses.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2A12:

Why Should I Learn This? Addressing Student Motivation with Relevant Professional Examples
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Laura Tucker, Harvard University
617-496-2248, ltucker@seas.harvard.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Mazur
  Abstract: Student learning hinges on motivation. [1] However, many students don't enter our classrooms knowing why learning physics has value, often asking, "Why should I learn this?" As instructors, we can help our students develop motivation. However, effectively conveying the power of physics principles and thinking is challenging, especially when directed at non-physics majors. Specific examples may not be readily available, and take time to research. Furthermore, testimonies from many individuals working in fields relevant to students can have more power than words from the instructor alone. Addressing this need, we have created a series of slides to be projected before lecture or used as handouts. These materials include profiles of professionals explaining how studying physics has helped them in their diverse careers. We hope to demonstrate relevance beyond the classroom of studying physics by providing answers from many relevant figures to the students? Questions about why learning physics is useful.
  Footnotes: [1] Ambrose, Susan, et. al. (2010). How Learning Works, 7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching Sponsor: Eric Mazur
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PST2A13:

Regularities in Real World Complex Trajectories Using Video Modeling
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Arturo Velasquez, Grupo de Física / Gimnasio La Montaña
6761861, grupofisica@glm.edu.co
  Co-Author(s): Fernando Huertas
  Abstract: Regular high school kinematics courses use rectilinear, projectile, and circular paths to introduce the idea of composite path. However, it is possible to introduce the same notion using real-world trajectories in the classroom: motion of a tennis raquet grip during free fall and motion of selected points on a spinning ballerina are analyzed with video modeling and detailed here.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Mauricio Mendivelso Villaquirán
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PST2A14:

Learning from/with Physics 'Sniglets': Classroom Neologisms in College Physics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Richard Zajac, Kansas State University at Salina
785-, rzajac@sal.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The words introductory students want to use don't always exist, but why should that stop them? A look at students' top wish list of useful "physics sniglets" provides some insight into their conceptual development. New contributions are also welcome.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2B01:

Open-source Electronic Education Tools Using Tablet PCs
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Zachary T. Boerner, Colorado School of Mines
(832) 489-2608, q
  Co-Author(s): Charley A. Parker, Vincent H. Kuo, Susan E. Kowalski, Frank V. Kowalski
  Abstract: The Technology in the Classroom Committee (TICC) at the Colorado School of Mines provides and manages a number of electronic education tools available for anyone to access. These include the InkSurvey tool, a wiki for information on the software used by TICC, and a forum for users to discuss Tablet PCs and the classes in which they are enrolled. InkSurvey, in a manner similar to clickers, provides instructors with the means to pose open-format questions. Combined with the use of Tablet PCs, this allows the instructor to perform a real-time formative assessment of students' problem solving abilities. This poster will explore the utility of each of these tools and suggest how institutions outside of the Colorado School of Mines may use them to further their own educational programs.
  Footnotes: Sponsor: Vincent H. Kuo
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PST2B02:

Item Response Theory Analysis of the Mechanics Baseline Test
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Carolin N. Cardamone, MIT
617-324-2731, cnc@mit.edu
  Co-Author(s): Saif Rayyan, Daniel Seaton, Albert Wu, Dave Pritchard
  Abstract: Item Response Theory (IRT) algorithms are being developed to better assess student performance in our Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics (ILEM; [1]). A student's skill, as determined by IRT, provides more information than the traditional student score because it takes into account universally calibrated problem difficulties. Importantly, it allows determination of skill on a universal scale independent of which questions the student answers. Our approaches seek to dynamically update student and class skill level in ILEM throughout the course based on their performance, rather than relying primarily on the gain from pre/post testing. We present results comparing IRT and pre/post gain analysis of the Mechanics Baseline Inventory Test, including discussion of item parameters for the 26 questions on the MBT exam.
  Footnotes: 1R. Teodorescu, A. Pawl, S. Rayyan, A. Barrantes and D. E. Pritchard, Toward an Integrated Online Environment, 2010 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings, edited by S. Rebello, M. Sabella and C. Singh
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PST2B03:

MAPS: Augmenting Attitudes and Transfer of Problem-solving Skills
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Carolin Cardamone, MIT
617-324-2731, cnc@mit.edu
  Co-Author(s): Analia Barrantes, Andrew Pawl, Saif Rayyan, Dave Pritchard
  Abstract: We present the ongoing implementation and assessment of our Modeling Applied to Problem Solving (MAPS) Pedagogy [1,2]. MAPS helps students develop expert-like problem solving skills. In particular, strategic skill is imparted by specifying the relevant systems and interactions as a guide to selecting the appropriate physical model for solving the problem. After taking a review course in mechanics using the MAPS pedagogy, students show significant improvement in three major categories: 1) problem solving ability measured by a calibrated final exam, 2) attitudes toward science in general (and specifically toward problem solving) measured by the CLASS [3], 3) transfer of problem solving skills to following courses, measured by enhanced exam performance in the subsequent Electricity and Magnetism course. We are expanding the implementation of MAPS in introductory courses inside and outside MIT, and looking for collaborators.
  Footnotes: [1] A. E. Pawl, A. Barrantes and D. E. Pritchard, ?Modeling applied to problem solving? in Proceedings of the 2009 Physics Education Research Conference, Ann Arbor, MI, 2009. [2] S. Rayyan, A. Pawl, , A. Barrantes, R. Teodorescu and D. E. Pritchard, Improved Student Performance in Electricity and Magnetism Following Prior MAPS Instruction in Mechanics, 2010 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings, edited by S. Rebello, M. Sabella and C. Singh [3] W. K. Adams, K.K., Perkins, N., Podolefsky, M., Dubson, N., Finkelstein, and C. E. Weiman. A new instrument for measuring student beliefs about physics and learning physics: the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey. Physical Review Special Topics: Physics Education Research 2(1), 010101, 2006.
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PST2B04:

Learning about Teaching Physics: New Podcast on Education Research Results
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Stephanie V. Chasteen, University of Colorado - Boulder
3037753277, stephanie.chasteen@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Michael Fuchs
  Abstract: Want to get the inside scoop on the latest research on teaching and learning? Curious about physics education research results, but don't have the time to keep up with the journals? Now you can keep up with the literature during your daily commute or trip to the gym with a new audio podcast, "Learning About Teaching Physics." Each short, well-produced podcast pairs education researchers and teachers to talk about an interesting result from the field, such as research on lecture demos, new research on the use of clickers, and whether tests can help students learn. What do these results mean? How does it relate to classroom practices? What challenges might a teacher face in trying to use such an idea? Stop by the poster to learn about the project, talk about the need to communicate between PER and practicing teachings, and to pick up a CD with the podcasts.
  Footnotes: "Learning About Teaching Physics" can be found on Compadre.org and at my blog, http://blog.sciencegeekgirl.com.
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PST2B05:

An Inside Look: Practical Strategies for Personal Response Systems ('clickers')
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Stephanie V. Chasteen, University of Colorado - Boulder
3037753277, stephanie.chasteen@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Katherine K. Perkins, Carl E Wieman
  Abstract: I never would have understood how clickers could be used to transform classroom teaching if I hadn't watched them in the hands of experienced instructors. Not every teacher has that opportunity. This poster will give you an overview of some of the resources we have created on clickers: Get a glimpse inside our classes at the University of Colorado with short videos, grab a copy of our instructor handbook, and come discuss any challenges you've had in implementing this powerful technique. I'll share ideas and strategies for success with clickers, from writing questions to facilitating discussion. In many ways, clickers help us support student achievement of higher order thinking skills, which are the hallmark of deeper learning.
  Footnotes: All clicker videos and resources are at http://STEMclickers.colorado.edu, and the University of Colorado?s clicker question collection is at http://www.colorado.edu/physics/EducationIssues/cts/ . This work was funded by CU?s Science Education Initiative and the National Science Foundation Grant No. 0737118.
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PST2B06:

Thermo-economics Optimization and Ecological Tax
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Eduardo Chávez Lima
Escuela Superior de Computo - Instituto Politécnico Nacional
57296000 ext. 52027, echavezl@ipn.mx
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Today, thermodynamics allows modeling processes that are innovative, added to this, the development of economic processes allows us to create links to the explanation of formulations in a different social, ethical, and historic context. So the relationship between thermodynamics and economics tries to solve conditions on the border of both sciences, proposing thermo-economics as a new branch of knowledge like econophysics, sociophysics, or quantum computing. In this work, we will determine the economically optimal operating point to models of power plants, using different energy transfer laws, similar to Curzon-Ahlborn, through the study of several operation regimes (optimization criteria) such as maximum power out, maximum ecological function, and maximum efficiency.
  Footnotes: WORK SUPPORTED BY COFAA -IPN
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PST2B07:

Using Virtual Experiments to Help Student Reasoning in Physics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Jiawu Fan, Beijing Normal University
6142922450, wojiaofjw@yahoo.com.cn
  Co-Author(s): Shaona Zhou, Chunhui Du, Jing Han, Lei Bao
  Abstract: We develop a computer virtual reality (VR) platform that supports interactive physics activities. We use the platform to help students conduct guided explorations to learning physics concepts and reasoning. A teaching experiment with two random selected groups of students was conducted. Students were asked to complete a one-hour exploration on one dimensional motion (1D motion) and circular motion. Using a cross-controlled design, we find that students doing virtual experiments outperform their peers doing paper-based problem solving. Show specific cases --One group of students did the 1D motion task in problem solving form and the circular motion task in VR form, and the other group did the 1D motion in VR form and the circular motion in problem solving form. Students in both groups liked the VR form more than problem solving form and perform better in VR form. Supported in part by NIH Award RC1RR028402 and NSF Awards DUE-0633473 and DUE-1044724
  Footnotes: None
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PST2B08:

Open Source Physics in the Amusement Park
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Michael R. Gallis, Penn State Schuylkill
570-385-6053, mrg3@psu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: There are a variety of tools from the Open Source Physics project appropriate for use in typical amusement park physics activities. The Tracker Video Analysis tool can be used to extract data from video clips that can be taken with almost any modern digital camera. The Easy Java Simulations tool allows users to easily build simulations of varying levels of complexity. This poster presents the use of these tools for "High School Physics Day" activities at local amusement parks and in a special topics course offered to advanced local high school students in a dual enrollment special topics course.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2B09:

Going Beyond End of Chapter Problems in LON-CAPA
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Boris Korsunsky, Weston High School
781-786-5800, korsunskyb@mail.weston.org
  Co-Author(s): Raluca E. Teodorescu, Carolin N Cardamone, Saif Rayyan, David Pritchard
  Abstract: We describe the open-source library of physics problems we are collecting in LON-CAPA (http://loncapa.mit.edu). Currently, the library features both traditional and research-based problems intended to expose students to various contexts, problem features, knowledge and cognitive processes. We are adding conceptual questions and challenge problems that require out of the box thinking. The conceptual questions are developed at Ohio State University and MIT. The challenge problems are inspired by various tasks published in The Physics Teacher [1-3]. We are planning to evaluate the difficulty and pedagogical effectiveness of those problems using Item Response Theory (IRT). This permits determination of a student's skill independent of which problems they do. We welcome collaborators willing to add their problems to our library.
  Footnotes: [1] Korsunsky, B. (2004) Ready, SET, Go! A research-based approach to problem solving. The Physics Teacher, 42, 493-497. [2] Korsunsky, B. (2001-present) Physics Challenges for Teachers and Students (a monthly column). The Physics Teacher. The library of past Challenges is online at http://tpt.aapt.org/features/physics_challenge_solutions [3] Korsunsky, B. (1995). Braintwisters for physics students. The Physics Teacher, 33, 550-553.
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PST2B10:

Harnessing Technology to Help Students Learn
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Taha Mzoughi, Kennesaw State University
6787972152, tmzoughi@kennesaw.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In an attempt to improve student learning in introductory physics courses, we have used active learning methods focused on the use of technology. The courses follow a hybrid format where most of the learning occurs outside of class. Lecture time is used to answer and discuss questions and to explore the topics students find interesting. The technologies used include computer-mediated and hands-on activities. Instead of lectures, students complete online multimedia quizzes, embedding both lecture type recording segments and simulations. The quiz is intended to help students focus on the intricacies of the topic covered. Homework is also completed online. It includes both traditional end of the chapter questions and simulation mediated questions. Hands-on laboratory activities are preceded by pre-laboratory simulation-mediated activities. We will describe the methods used and preliminary results on the effectiveness of the approach.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2B11:

PhET: An Expanding Resource of Free Online Interactive Simulations
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Noah Podolefsky, University of Colorado at Boulder
303-641-8217, Noah.Podolefsky@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Noah S. Podolefsky, Katherine K Perkins, PhET Team
  Abstract: The PhET Interactive Simulations project is expanding in new directions. We are building new connections to our teacher-user community -- get the latest news by following our new blog, joining us on Facebook, or receiving Twitter updates. We're also making sims for middle school science -- adapting existing sims, creating new ones, and partnering with teachers to investigate their use in classrooms. We now have more than 100 simulations of physical phenomena that create animated, interactive, game-like environments in which students learn through scientist-like exploration. Our simulations emphasize the connections between real-life phenomena and the underlying science, make the invisible visible, and include the visual models used by expert scientists. New sims include: Gravity and Orbits, Capacitor Lab, Density, Buoyancy, Bending Light, Fluid Pressure and Flow, and Resonance Lab, along with a growing collection of chemistry simulations. Visit http://phet.colorado.edu.
  Footnotes: The PhET Project is funded by the Hewlett Foundation, NSF CCLI Grant #0817582, NSF DRK12 Grant #1020362, the O?Donnell Foundation, JILA, and University of Colorado at Boulder.
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PST2B12:

Teaching Physics Across Grades with Sustainable Energies via Digital Technologies
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - David Rosengrant, Kennesaw State University
678 797 2482, drosengr@kennesaw.edu
  Co-Author(s): Matthew Laposata
  Abstract: Many college and high school students do not understand the basic physics behind sustainable energies. As a result of this, students have erroneous beliefs about sustainable energies. Thus, the "Sustainable Homes: Building 'Smarter' Houses Today for a Better Tomorrow" project aims to combine physics with environmental science so that students can better understand both sciences. We have updated our website (http://ihome21.kennesaw.edu/) with new activities and videos in the past year. Through these exercises, students will: see detailed descriptions of sustainable housing technologies and how they differ from conventional systems; use data from actual sustainable homes, including the "Weatherford Place" development in Roswell, GA, to critically analyze the performance of these technologies; and conduct hands-on activities that demonstrate how these sustainable technologies operate on a smaller scale. We also report on how teachers in our professional development sessions have utilized these resources.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2B13:

First Assessment of the Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Raluca E. Teodorescu
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
617-253-5729, rteodore@mit.edu
  Co-Author(s): Analia Barrantes, Sara Julin, Saif Rayyan, David Pritchard
  Abstract: We present the first evaluation of our open-source Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics (ILEM) [1] - http://loncapa.mit.edu. The centerpiece of this environment is a collection of multi-level research-based homework sets organized by topic and cognitive complexity, whose design helps students learn physics problem solving. These sets are associated with learning modules that contain short expositions of the content supplemented by integrated open-access videos, worked examples, simulations, and tutorials. In our evaluation of homework problems, we analyze student attempts, preferences and performance on different types of problems (e.g. representation, ranking and strategy writing problems). In our evaluation of content, we analyze observations generated by student comments in the discussion boards and during critical thinking activities. We continue to expand and improve the content and we welcome users and collaborators.
  Footnotes: [1] R. Teodorescu, A. Pawl, S. Rayyan, A. Barrantes and D. E. Pritchard, Toward an Integrated Online Environment, 2010 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings, edited by S. Rebello, M. Sabella and C. Singh
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PST2B14:

A Meteorological Network Using Open-source Hardware and Software
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Sergio Trujillo, Grupo de Física / Gimnasio La Montaña
6761861, grupofisica@glm.edu.co
  Co-Author(s): Juan P. Villamil, Simon Vargas, Juan F Ceron, Fabian Martinez
  Abstract: We design a weather monitoring network in Bogotá, Colombia, using semiconductor devices, Arduino platform, and plotting software developed with open source software processing. Using some open license schematics, teams of high school physics teachers and students build Arduino-based interfaces and plotting/data storage software to install and set up meteorological stations at several schools along the city. We obtain temperature, wind velocity, humidity, barometric pressure and precipitation vs. time plots over variable time intervals to study weather behavior in our city.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Mauricio Mendivelso Villaquirán
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PST2B15:

Ready for Classroom Use? Assessment of the Andes Homework System
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Brett van de Sande, Arizona State University, CIDSE
4809657455, bvds@asu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Andes intelligent tutor homework system has been used in the classroom at the U.S. Naval Academy and elsewhere since 2000. It now contains more than 500 problems covering most of the topics in a standard introductory physics course. During the last few years, we have developed a new version of Andes that runs in a web browser. We describe new data-mining techniques for automatically detecting, and correcting, errors and weakness in the tutor system. Also, we present evidence from both laboratory and classroom studies that new web-based Andes is ready for classroom use.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2B16:

The Studies in Motion Videodisc: New Uses for Old Media
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Christopher D. Wentworth, Doane College
402-826-8257, chris.wentworth@doane.edu
  Co-Author(s): Amy E. Craig, Robert G. Fuller
  Abstract: "The Studies in Motion" videodisc was an early example of interactive multimedia produced by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and The Annenberg School of Communications for educational use in an introductory college lab setting. While videodisc technology is obsolete, the media produced for this videodisc remains a rich source of material for introductory physics students to explore and analyze. We present several examples of using digitized clips from the original videodisc for introductory physics activities using modern digital video analysis software such VideoPoint and Tracker. All of the original video media and suggested activities are available on the web at the Humanized Physics Project website*.
  Footnotes: * http://physics.doane.edu/hpp/Resources/SIMLD/SIMLDHome.htm.
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PST2B17:

Electricity and Magnetism Self-Testing and Test Construction Tool
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - John C. Stewart, University of Arkansas
479-445-2522, johns@uark.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This poster presents an online resource for teaching and evaluating introductory electricity and magnetism classes. The resource contains a library of highly characterized, multiple-choice, conceptual, and quantitative electricity and magnetism problems and solutions all linked to a free online textbook. The library contains over 1000 classroom tested problems. Each problem is characterized by the complexity of its solution and by the fundamental intellectual steps found in the solution. Exam construction, administration, and analysis tools are provided through the resource's website. Problems may be downloaded for use in exams or as clicker questions. A self-testing tool is provided for students or instructors, an excellent tool for brushing up on conceptual electricity and magnetism. Conceptual inventory scores produced by the site are normed against the Conceptual Survey in Electricity and Magnetism. There is no cost associated with using any of the facilities of the site and you can begin to use the site immediately. Supported by NSF - DUE 0535928. Site address http://physinfo.uark.edu/physicsonline.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2B18:

Attitude Effects through Procedural Videos in Introductory Mechanics Lab Sessions
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Monica Quezada, University of juarez
(915) 422 3294, seflores@uacj.mx
  Co-Author(s): Sergio Flores, Oscar Ruiz, Juan Luna, Jose Valente Barron
  Abstract: Many introductory physics students have problems understanding when they try to learn physics concepts through the knowledge real representation during lab sessions. The research group named Physics and Mathematics in Context from the University of Ciudad, Juarez, Mexico, has developed an instructional approach based on videos to help students to recognize and learn the properties of concepts as forces, Newton's second law, and tension force. These videos are projected during the lab sessions to allow a direct interaction between the object knowledge (physical concepts) and the knowledge subject (the students). These videos show the materials, instruments, procedures, and the corresponding description of the cognitive and physical abilities students demand to develop the labs successfully. This didactic design is based on the theories of mathematical representations and visualization. We will show and describe samples of these videos and their students' attitude effects.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C01:

Influence of Sequencing Individual and Group Activities on Student Learning
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Bijaya Aryal, University of Minnesota-Rochester
5072588216, baryal@umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Previous research findings have documented the positive impact of group interaction on student learning. Much of the previous work has focused on the use of group activities and assignments. However, it is equally important for students to develop the skills to make decisions individually, which suggests the necessity of individual activities and assignments in the learning space. I have integrated individual and group learning activities in the design of a three-stage learning sequence. The learning sequence involves two individual assignments and one group assignment. As a part of the assessment of this instructional strategy, the correlation between the sequence of the individual and group assignments and enhanced student learning will be evaluated. This presentation describes the learning activity sequence with some examples. In addition, preliminary results of the effects of variations in the sequence of group and individual activities on student learning is presented.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C02:

Student Reasoning about Graphical Representations of Definite Integrals
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Rabindra R. Bajracharya
Physics Department, University of Maine
2076029860, ab_study@yahoo.com
  Co-Author(s): John R. Thompson, Thomas Thomas Wemyss
  Abstract: Physics students are expected to apply the mathematics learned in their mathematics courses to physics concepts and problems. Few PER studies have distinguished between difficulties students have with physics concepts and those they have with mathematics concepts, application of those concepts, or the representations used to connect the math and the physics. We are conducting empirical studies of student responses to mathematics questions dealing with graphical representations of (single-variable) integration. Reasoning in written responses could be put into roughly three major categories related to particular features of the graphs: area under the curve, position of the function, and shape of the curve. In subsequent individual interviews, we varied representational features to explore the depth and breadth of the contextual nature of student reasoning, with an emphasis on negative integrals. Results suggest an incomplete understanding of the criteria that determine the sign of a definite integral.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C03:

Assessing Student Affect in Learning Computation in Introductory Mechanics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Marcos D. Caballero, Georgia Institute of Technology
770-827-3185, caballero@gatech.edu
  Co-Author(s): Matthew A. Kohlmyer, Michael F Schatz
  Abstract: An introductory physics course at Georgia Tech requires students to learn numerical computation for describing physical phenomenon that are not amenable to being solved using analytic methods. Students' motivation to learn computation and anxiety about solving computational exercises varies greatly. The attitudes, interests, and values that students exhibit when learning a subject can play a role in their motivation to and anxiety about learning the subject. We present a brief overview of the development of a new tool, the Computation Modeling in Physics Attitudinal Student Survey (COMPASS), aimed at helping to characterize students' attitudes about, interests in, and values concerning computation, as well as preliminary measurements derived from this instrument.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C04:

Teaching Assistants' Reasons for the Design of Problem Solutions for Introductory Physics: Rationale and Methodology
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - William Mamudi, Western Michigan University
2692670712 , william.o.mamudi@wmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Charles Henderson, Shih-Yin Lin, Chandralekha Singh, Edit Yerushalmi
  Abstract: As part of a larger study to understand how instructors make teaching decisions, we investigated how graduate teaching assistants (TAs) perceive features of written problem solutions. TAs are an important population to understand; they often provide significant instruction and they also represent the pool of future physics faculty. This talk will focus on the methodology used to study TAs enrolled in a training course. Data were collected via a series of tasks related to concrete instructional artifacts (solutions to the same physics problem that vary in their representation of expert problem solving as well as in their instructional approach). Important aspects of the design were a) using artifacts from a previous study of faculty to allow for comparison of results, b) developing a written questionnaire that requires respondents to explicitly connect problem features with preferences and reasons, and c) documenting respondent ideas both pre- and post-discussion within their training course.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C05:

An Optics Concepts Test
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Alex Chediak, California Baptist University
951-343-4912, achediak@calbaptist.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: A series of conceptual tests exist that allow educators to compare their normalized gains to those of other educators, and together determine best practices (e.g., FCI, MBT, FMCE, ECCE, CSEM, and DIRECT). But a standard conceptual test for optics is a seeming omission in the PER literature--this in spite of the common observation, by physics educator and students alike, that optics is perhaps one of the most conceptually challenging areas of undergraduate physics. The math is often simple (a few equations, no vector algebra), but the concepts easy to confuse. This poster presents a multi-choice question optics conceptual test, consisting of 20 questions, each having five choices. Topics covered include reflection, refraction, mirrors, lenses, interference, cameras, human eye maladies, and optical corrections. I seek partners to join me in using these questions on pre- and post-tests with their students.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C06:

Concentration Analysis and Item Response Theory
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Li Chen
School of Electronic science and engeering, Southeast University
614-292-2450, chenli.seu@163.com
  Co-Author(s): Jing Han, Chunhui Du, Yan Tu, Lei Bao
  Abstract: Both Concentration Analysis and Item Response Theory (IRT) are useful tools in education assessment. In concentration analysis, the concentration factor gives a scaled value describing how students' answers to individual questions are concentrated. Perfectly concentrated responses will produce a concentration value of 1 while random responses will produce 0. In IRT, an estimated parameter, the guessing parameter, also describes the chance of guessing in response to a question. Then it is meaningful to find out if these two factors are related. Based on the college students' FCI data collected at The Ohio State University, the concentration factor and guessing parameters for all 30 FCI questions are calculated. The results show a weak correlation between these two measures (Sig.=0.222). After comparing the algorithms, we find that concentration factor focus on all of the choices, while in IRT only the binary score (right or wrong) are used. The implications of the differences will be discussed with suggestions on revisions of the algorithms.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NIH Award RC1RR028402 and NSF Awards DUE-0633473 and DUE-1044724
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PST2C07:

Evaluation of Student Exam Note Sheets in Introductory General Physics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Fredrick M. DeArmond, Portland State University
260.385.6661, fmd@pdx.edu
  Co-Author(s): Chris Sheaffer, Ralf Widenhorn
  Abstract: An ongoing study is being performed involving the collection and evaluation of note sheets prepared by students for use on exams in a first-year algebra-based physics courses of 120-200 students. The note sheets are evaluated based on organization, quantity, the use of examples and diagrams, and the number of topics covered. In addition, a Likert scale survey was given to students regarding how they generated and used their note sheets. Preliminary results are presented and suggest negative correlations between exam grades and the quantity of equations on note sheets, and those who most strongly agreed with the statement "I referred to my note sheet many times during the exam." Positive correlations are found between exam grades and organization, and students who most strongly agreed with the statement "making my note sheet helped me review for the exam."
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C08:

Teaching Assistant and Student Interactions in a SCALE-UP Classroom
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - George DeBeck V, Oregon State University
9522709374, debeckg@onid.orst.edu
  Co-Author(s): Dedra Demaree
  Abstract: In the spring term of 2010, Oregon State University began using a SCALE-UP-style classroom in the instruction of the introductory calculus-based physics series. Instruction in this classroom was conducted in three two-hour sessions facilitated by the primary professor and either two graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) or a graduate teaching assistant and an undergraduate learning assistant (LA). During the course of instruction, two of the eight tables in the room were audio and video recorded. We examine the practices of the GTAs and LAs in interacting with the students through both qualitative and quantitative analyses of these recordings. In particular, we examine changes in the practices of the GTAs and LAs as they gain experience in the SCALE-UP environment, as well as differences between the practices of the individual GTAs and Las.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C09:

Rasch Model Analysis of a Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment (BEMA)
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Lin Ding
School of Teaching and Learning, The Ohio State University
614-688-8377, ding.65@osu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Brief Electricity & Magnetism Assessment (BEMA) is a 30-item multiple-choice test, designed to measure student understanding of basic electricity and magnetism (E&M) concepts at the introductory physics level. It differs from concept inventories, such as the FCI, in that it covers a broad spectrum of sub-topics in a specific knowledge domain. A great deal of research previously has been conducted to evaluate its validity and reliability, as well as to apply it for gauging student performance. These efforts all utilized the Classical Test Theory (CTT) for analyzing quantitative information extracted from a large collection of data. In the present study we used the Rasch model, an item response-based theory (IRT), to analyze BEMA. Specifically, we investigated the extent to which the BEMA items can measure a single underlying construct--students' understanding of E&M. We also attempted to seek multiple latent constructs in BEMA for comparison with the single-construct case.
  Footnotes: * This project is partially supported by the OSU EHE SEED grant.
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PST2C10:

Solving Synthesis Problems through Analogical Encoding
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Lin Ding
School of Teaching and Learning, The Ohio State University
614-688-8377, ding.65@osu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Andrew F. Heckler, Cameron M. Teichgraeber
  Abstract: Real-world physics problems often require a solver to apply several concepts jointly to reach a coherent solution. In an effort to enhance students' problem solving abilities, we developed and used synthesis problems, which combine multiple topics that are taught at sufficiently different time points in the introductory physics course or beyond, to help students with recognition, coordination, and integration of fundamental physics concepts. To further provide appropriate scaffolding, we employed the analogical encoding approach by presenting to and asking students to compare two examples of similar underlying structure yet differing surface features prior to their solving a target problem. We investigated the effects of analogical encoding on students' solving physics synthesis problems through three training conditions: example problems with comparison, examples without comparison, and no examples. All students solved the same target synthesis problem at the end of training. Preliminary results show an advantage for analogical encoding.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C11:

Towards a Better Understanding of Confusion
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Jason E. Dowd, Harvard University
7733830088, jedowd.work@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Ives S. Araujo, Eric Mazur
  Abstract: Physics instructors typically try to avoid confusing their students. However, the truism underlying this approach, "confusion is bad," has been challenged by educators dating as far back as Socrates, who asked students to question assumptions and wrestle with ideas. This begs the question: Are confused students lost, or does their confusion indicate more critical thinking than less-confused learners? In previous work, we focused on a single reading assignment, a snapshot. Insights from this work allowed us to refine and expand our study to more than 40 snapshots that span two semesters of introductory physics, which involved Just-in-Time Teaching and research-based reading materials. We evaluated performance on assignments while simultaneously asking students to self-assess their confusion over the material, and then probed whether "confused" students were correct more or less frequently than "not-confused" students. We highlight our results and draw some conclusions about confusion. Is it really as bad as it seems?
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C12:

E-Games and Graph Problems: Helping Students Play the Game
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Elizabeth Gire, University of Memphis
785-323-7005, egire@memphis.edu
  Co-Author(s): Dong-Hai Nguyen, N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: An epistemic game is a structured activity used to guide inquiry or solve a problem. For example, list making is an epistemic game one might use to identify and organize items needed for making a meal. Physicists often (implicitly) use a graphical analysis epistemic game to analyze data or to solve problems involving graphs. In analyzing a set of interviews with introductory physics students, we use the framework epistemic games to characterize students' abilities to solve graph problems and how a tutor helps these students become more competent players of this e-game.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C13:

Case Studies of Increasing Participation in a Physics Learning Community
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Renee Michelle Goertzen, Florida International University
2408210456, rgoertze@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe, Laird Kramer
  Abstract: We present a case study of two introductory undergraduate physics students' increasing participation in the physics learning community at Florida International University (FIU). An implicit goal in the reforms implement by the Physics Education Research Group at FIU has been the establishment of multiple opportunities for entry into and participation in a community of physics learners. These opportunities include classes using research-based curricula (Modeling Instruction and Investigative Science Learning Environment), a Learning Assistant program, and a growing cohort of physics majors. Using interviews conducted across a year of introductory physics, we explore the trajectories of two students who have successfully increased their participation in a physics learning community.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C14:

Enhancing Student Interest through Increased Autonomy in the Physics Classroom
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Nicholas R. Hall, University of California, Davis
(530) 304-2822, nrhall@ucdavis.edu
  Co-Author(s): David Webb
  Abstract: We perform an experiment involving 300 students in an active-learning introductory physics course for biological science undergraduates at the University of California, Davis. The students are divided into 10 discussion/labs (DLs) that meet for 140 minutes twice a week and are taught by five teaching assistants (TAs). Five DLs are "autonomy-supportive" in that during the second half of each class the students choose how to apply, expound on, or clarify what they have learned. We compare this experimental group to a control group of five "traditional" active-engagement DLs. Each TA teaches one autonomy-supportive and one traditional DL. We hypothesize that increased autonomy-support will help improve attitudes, increase interest, and enhance performance. We measure these effects with grades and specially designed surveys. This study could have important implications for introductory physics class design by testing whether the positive effects of increased student autonomy in class outweigh the benefits of the alternatives.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C15:

Probing Student Understanding with Alternative Questioning Strategies
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Jeffrey M. Hawkins, The University of Maine
2075706067, jeffrey.hawkins@maine.edu
  Co-Author(s): Brian W. Frank, Michael C Wittmann, John R Thompson, Thomas M Wemyss
  Abstract: Common research methodology uses research tasks that ask students to identify a correct answer and justify their answer choice. We propose expanding the array of research tasks to access different knowledge that students might have. By asking students to discuss answers they may not have chosen naturally, we can investigate students' abilities to explain something that is already established or to disprove an incorrect response. The results of these research tasks also provide us with information about how students' responses vary across the different tasks. We discuss three underused question types and their possible benefits. Additionally, we present results from data gathered using these question types and contrast these with results gathered using a traditional question.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C16:

Increasing the Impact of PER: Recommendations from Typical Faculty
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Charles Henderson, Western Michigan University
2693874951, charles.henderson@wmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Melissa H. Dancy, Chandra Turpen
  Abstract: In previous work [1,2], we found that most physics faculty in the United States are familiar with and value instructional strategies based on Physics Education Research (PER). Yet, we also found that use of these strategies lags considerably behind knowledge. We have attempted to understand this gap between knowledge and use from several perspectives. In this poster we will explore this issue from the perspective of typical faculty. As part of a larger study, we conducted telephone interviews with 70 physics faculty who indicated that they had some exposure to PER. Based on these conversations, we describe the actions faculty recommended that the PER community might take in order to have more of an impact on the teaching practices of typical faculty.
  Footnotes: Supported, in part, by NSF Award No. 0715698. 1. Henderson, C. & Dancy, M. (2009) The Impact of Physics Education Research on the Teaching of Introductory Quantitative Physics in the United States, Physical Review Special Topics: Physics Education Research, 5 (2), 020107. 2. Dancy, M. & Henderson, C. (2010) Pedagogical Practices and Instructional Change of Physics Faculty, American Journal of Physics, Physics, 78 (10), 1056-1063.
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PST2C17:

Influence of Prior Preparation on Students' Use of Online Hints
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Dehui Hu, Kansas State University
7855321612, dehuihu@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Joshua Von Korff, N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: How do students combine their existing resources and invent new strategies when facing a challenging physics problem? In our study, we examine student use of resources and transfer of problem-solving skills in the context of differentiation and integration. Physics problems that use integration and differentiation require students to coordinate their understanding of mathematics as well as physics concepts, procedures, and representations. After a 50-minute tutorial session, students work through a challenging physics problem over a 30-minute testing period. By using an online environment to control and monitor their progress through a series of hints, we assess their use of resources and the impact of hints and previous learning. We also compare students' performance under different preparations by giving different tutorial materials prior to the testing period.
  Footnotes: This work is supported in part by U.S. National Science Foundation grant 0816207.
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PST2C19:

Students' Response Characteristics on Sequences of Phenomenological Demonstration in Electric Connections of Light Bulbs
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Myung Su Hwang, Korea National University of Education
010-2564-1133, fox1120@hanmail.net
  Co-Author(s): Jae Sool Kwon, Jung Bog Kim
  Abstract: We found an effective sequence of phenomenological demonstration by analyzing the levels of cognitive conflict and the types of student's response according to presenting orders of series and parallel connection of electric light bulbs. Parallel connection ahead caused a higher score in cognitive conflict than series connection ahead. Also, we found that earlier representation of questions different from students' predictions is more efficient for causing cognitive conflict than earlier representation of predictable questions. Students solving questions about series circuit first and then parallel circuit recognized the difference of connections more easily compared to the opposite sequence. However, students experiencing the parallel connection first tried to find out more the scientific reasons in mixed connection questions. Presenting a parallel circuit before series circuit turned out to be more effective for strategy for higher cognitive conflict.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C20:

Johnson-Laird Cognitive Framework: Its Application During Problem Solving
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Bashirah Ibrahim, Kansas State University
(785)3237794, bibrahim@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: The study explores the categories of cognitive structures constructed by engineering students taking a calculus-based physics course at Kansas State University. A sample of 19 students completed 10 non-directed tasks, with different representational format, on the topics of kinematics and work. Individual interviews were conducted immediately following these tasks. The Johnson-Laird (1983) cognitive framework was applied to classify the participants' mental representations. The framework proposes three main types of internal constructs: propositional representations constituting syntactic structures that connect a series of symbols together, mental models that are analogical representations of a real-world situation or objects, and mental images that are internal views of mental models with greater visual spatial features. We will discuss the importance of this framework in the classification of students' mental representations in this study.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NSF grant 0816207.
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PST2C21:

Online Pre- and Post-Diagnostic Testing Across Multiple Classes
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Stephen H. Irons, Yale University
203-432-3664, stephen.irons@yale.edu
  Co-Author(s): C. Meg Urry
  Abstract: Over the last several years we have instituted diagnostic pre- and post-testing in our three primary introductory physics classes (life sciences, engineering, physics majors). For the fall semester we developed and used a conceptual test that is broader than the standard FCI. This decision was based on our discovery that FCI scores for the tested cohort were quite high, leaving little room to measure improvement. For the spring semester we administered the Conceptual Survey in Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) in its unaltered form. Our data reveal that students as a whole self-select fairly reliably in terms of which introductory course is best for them. In addition, we found teaching methods that involve interactive engagement led to larger normalized gains than using standard instructional techniques. We will also describe our experience in administering these tests in an online form and discuss the possible effect this had on our results.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C22:

Nonscience Majors' Thinking about Ionizing Radiation
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Andy Johnson, Black Hills State University
605-645-3332, andy.johnson@bhsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Anna Hafele
  Abstract: We have been developing materials to teach nonscience majors about ionizing radiation in a science literacy course. The Radiation by Inquiry Project (DUE 0942699) is uncovering problematic learned and spontaneous ideas about radiation, atoms, radioactivity, and the interaction of radiation with matter. This poster identifies some of the common ideas, our tools and strategies for getting students beyond them, and provides evidence of substantial learning. Http://www.camse.org/andy/radiation
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C23:

Case Study of Student Pairs Working on Electronics Capstone Projects
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Nasser M. Juma, Kansas State University
785-532-1612, mhuninas@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): N. Sanjay Rebello, Kristan L. Corwin, Brian R. Washburn
  Abstract: We observed three pairs of students, each considered to be a different case, as they worked on lab experiments in an upper-division electronics and instrumentation laboratory course. In the first half of the course, the students learned about various analog and digital electronic components through mini-lectures and lab activities building electronic circuits. In the second half of the course each pair worked on a different open-ended capstone project that required them to use their knowledge of electronics to improve the measurements done on a physics experiment they have worked on in a previous semester. The student pairs brainstormed ideas to improve the measurement design and built circuitry to implement their design. Our data sources included observations of groups work, interviews with instructors and students, as well as artifacts produced by the students. We present the results of our case study focusing on comparisons between the student pairs.
  Footnotes: This work is supported in part by NSF grant DUE-0736897.
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PST2C24:

Students Reconciling Contradictory Commitments in Damped Harmonic Motion Problems
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Adam Kaczynski, The University of Maine
906-553-4232, A.Kaczynski@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Michael C. Wittmann
  Abstract: In intermediate and advanced physics courses, students are expected to use mathematical, graphical, and physical reasoning, as well as their intuitions. These intuitions may contradict each other and can be inconsistent with ideas developed during small group learning activities. On the topic of damped harmonic motion, students have intuitions about the mathematics, the physics, and the way the graph of the motion should look. Students remain committed to some of these intuitions to the point of not using provided instructional resources. They also deal with contradictions when their commitments to one kind of reasoning conflict with their commitments to another (e.g., the analysis of a mathematical derivation conflicts with that of a free-body diagram summarizing physical reasoning). These multiple commitments have an effect on students' classroom discussion and the way that students reconcile contradictory commitments and conclusions.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C25:

Gender Differences in Psychological Factors and Interventions to Address Them
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Lauren E. Kost-Smith, University of Colorado at Boulder
630-212-1864, Lauren.Kost@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Steven J. Pollock, Noah D. Finkelstein
  Abstract: Despite males and females being equally represented at the college level in several STEM disciplines (biology, chemistry, mathematics), females continue to be under-represented in physics. Our research attempts to understand and address this gender gap by focusing on introductory physics courses. We characterize gender differences in performance, psychological factors, and retention that exist in Physics 1 and 2 [1,2]. We find gender differences in performance can largely be accounted for by differences in the physics and mathematics backgrounds and incoming attitudes and beliefs of males and females. But these background factors do not completely account for the gender gaps. We hypothesize, based on gender differences in self-efficacy, that identity threat is playing a role in our courses. Working with researchers in psychology, we implemented an identity threat intervention in three offerings of Physics 1 [3]. We report on the effectiveness of the intervention to alleviate gender gaps in performance.
  Footnotes: [1] L. E. Kost, S. J. Pollock & N. D. Finkelstein, PRST-PER, 5, 010101. [2] L. E. Kost-Smith, S. J. Pollock & N. D. Finkelstein, PRST-PER, 6, 020112. [3] A. Miyake, et al., Science, 330, 1234.
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PST2C26:

Mentoring Undergraduate Physics Majors at a Hispanic Serving Institution
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Laird H. Kramer, Florida International University
3053486073, Laird.Kramer@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): David Jones, Eric Brewe
  Abstract: We present an overview of the undergraduate physics learning community at Florida International University. The number of intended and declared physics majors at FIU has increased by 1500%, when comparing three-year averages to the early 1990s. This is most compelling as FIU is a minority-serving urban public research institution in Miami, serving more than 42,000 students, of which 60% are Hispanic, 12% are Black, and 56% are women. We attribute this dramatic growth to a number of factors, including strategic mentoring activities integrated into our programs. This poster will highlight the mentoring activities within FIU's Physics Department, how those strategies integrate into other research-based approaches, and how multiple faculty have developed into effective student mentors.
  Footnotes: Supported by NSF Award # PHY-0802184.
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PST2C27:

Self-Reported In-Class Emotional Responses: A Trial Run
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - W. Brian Lane, Jacksonville University
904-256-7326, wlane@ju.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: It is important for physics teachers to understand the impact of students' emotional responses to class discussions and activities. In an upper-level electromagnetic theory course, we asked students to report their emotional states in class using flashcards and clickers, with each card or button corresponding to one of the emotions most commonly experienced while learning physics (curiosity, frustration, happiness, anxiety, boredom, and confusion), and based the flow of class discussion on these responses. The students responded very positively to this teaching strategy, indicating that their learning experience was enhanced and that they perceived a great level of support from the instructor. In this poster presentation, we describe the outcomes of this teaching strategy, outline the lessons learned for future refinement, and propose an implementation in multiple introductory physics courses with the goal of comparing students' in-class emotional states with their learning gains and learning attitude shifts.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C28:

Successes and Constraints in Enactment of One Relatively Successful Reform
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - May Lee, University of Colorado - Boulder
2197944559, may.lee@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Melissa Dancy, Charles Henderson, Eric Brewe
  Abstract: Although nearly two decades of research documents the potential positive impact of research-based reforms on conceptual understanding, the American Institute of Physics found that less than 30% of high school physics teachers in the U.S. enact reforms in their classrooms. One of the more successfully disseminated reforms is Modeling Instruction. Students taught by expert modeling teachers have gains on the Force Concept Inventory that are at least 30% greater than the students taught through traditional instruction. Our primary research question is "Why has this reform been relatively successful?" We interviewed five people who played critical roles in the development of Modeling Instruction. In this poster, we discuss significant aspects of the reform that led to its successes and constraints as identified in the interviews.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C29:

Investigating Students' Understanding of Magnetism
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Jing Li, University of Pittsburgh
412-526-8896, fairylee86@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Chandralekha Singh
  Abstract: We are investigating the difficulties that students have in learning about magnetism. A 30 item research-based survey was developed. During the development of the survey, we administered free-response questions to a large number of students in the classroom and interviewed a subset of students individually. We will discuss the reliability and validity issues and present our findings about difficulties with magnetism concepts after traditional instruction.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C30:

Teaching Assistants' Reasons for the Design of Problem Solutions for Introductory Physics: Findings
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - ShihYin Lin, University of Pittsburgh
4127080116, hellosilpn@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Chandralekha Singh, William Mamudi, Charles Henderson, Edit Yerushalmi
  Abstract: As part of a larger study to understand how instructors make teaching decisions, we investigated how graduate teaching assistants (TAs) perceive features of written problem solutions. TAs are an important population to understand; they often provide significant instruction and they also represent the pool of future physics faculty. Twenty-four first-year graduate TAs enrolled in a training course were provided with different instructor solutions for the same physics problem and asked to discuss their preferences for prominent solution features. Preliminary findings reveal that providing a schematic visualization of the problem, listing knowns/unknowns and explaining reasoning in explicit words were the most valued features. Preferences for different features were sometimes in conflict with each other. For example, while the TAs valued solutions where reasoning was explicitly explained, they also valued concise solutions. We'll present the reasons behind these preferences and discuss the implications for the professional developments of physics Tas.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C31:

Physical and Virtual Manipulatives' Effect on Students' Models of Pulleys
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Adrian M. Madsen, Kansas State University
7855321612, adrianc@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Amy Rouinfar, Tram Do Ngoc Hoang, N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: Several studies have investigated differences in students' learning with physical and virtual manipulatives. However, not as many studies have looked into the process by which any differences in learning occur. In this study, we look closely at the process of conceptual change as students interact with either physical or virtual pulley systems. Students in five conceptual physics laboratory classes investigated various pulleys systems over two consecutive laboratory classes, each nearly two hours long. Half of the students in each class learned with a computer simulation while the other half used actual pulleys, strings, and weights. All students were given identical instructions that prompted them to construct their own understanding of pulley systems by comparing and testing different systems. We report on how students' ideas about pulleys changed as they progressed through the activities and compare learning with physical and virtual manipulatives.
  Footnotes: This work is supported in part by U.S. Dept. of Education IES grant award R305A080507
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PST2C32:

Effectiveness of Prescribed Prompts at Priming Sensemaking During Group Problem-Solving
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Mathew A. Martinuk, University of British Columbia
7788366366, martinuk@physics.ubc.ca
  Co-Author(s): Joss Ives
  Abstract: Many researchers and textbooks have promoted the use of rigid prescribed strategies for encouraging development of expert-like problem-solving behavior in novice students. The UBC Physics 100 course has been using Context-Rich problems with a prescribed five-step strategy since 2007. We have been analyzing audio recordings of students during group problem-solving sessions to analyze students' epistemological framing based on the implicit goal of their discussions. By treating the goal of "understanding the physics situation" as "sensemaking," we analyze the effectiveness of structured prompts intended to promote a shift to a sensemaking discussion. This poster will describe the setting, research methods, and results.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C33:

Do Students Reason Better in Interactive Courses?
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Mojgan Matloob Haghanikar, Kansas State University
7855327167, mojgan@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sytil Murphy, Dean Zollman
  Abstract: As part of a study on the science preparation of elementary school teachers, we compared students' reasoning skills in courses with inquiry-oriented teaching strategies and their counterparts in traditional courses. We devised content questions that are open-ended and probed students' ability of applying recently learned concepts in a new context. Inspired by Bloom's revised taxonomy [1], we designed a rubric to analytically examine students' responses. Our rubric describes seven traits that we consider as the evidence of understanding for which we defined three levels of accomplishment. In this paper we present our analysis of five inquiry-oriented and traditional pairs of classes from five different universities. The classes came from a variety of disciplines. We will also investigate if the differences between the classes are statistically significant. Supported by National Science Foundation grant ESI-055 4594
  Footnotes: L.W. Anderson & D.R. Krathwohl, A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. New York: Longman (2001)
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PST2C34:

The PER User's Guide: A New Web Resource for Consumers of Physics Education Research
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Sarah B. McKagan, AAPT
2063354325, sam.mckagan@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The PER User's Guide is a web resource to help physics educators learn about the results of physics education research (PER) and apply those results in their classroom. We are launching a pilot site this year with guides to a small selection of research-based teaching methods. We plan to extend this site to become a comprehensive guide to all aspects of PER that are relevant to educators. This will help educators by summarizing, condensing, and translating the vast web of knowledge contained in the field of PER into a format that is easily accessible, enabling educators to quickly find and use the information they need. The PER User's Guide design is based on user testing and research into faculty adoption and adaption of research-based teaching methods.
  Footnotes: The PER User?s Guide is a collection hosted on compadre.org and is supported by NSF NSDL 0840853.
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PST2C35:

Examining Correlations Between Lecture Conceptual Question Responses and Course Performance
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Jeffrey T. Morgan, University of Northern Iowa
319-273-2290, jeff.morgan@uni.edu
  Co-Author(s): Cynthia Wakefield
  Abstract: We have implemented peer instruction in an introductory level conceptual physics course for non-science majors, based on the success that others report with this method.(1) We expected to see that learning from peer conversation, as evidenced by answering conceptual questions correctly following discussion, would correlate with course grade, but did not observe any link. We did, however, note moderate correlation between answering a conceptual question correctly prior to peer conversation and course grade, indicating that while peer conversation improves the interactivity of a lecture course, interaction may be more important to student success than arriving at the correct answer.
  Footnotes: 1. Crouch, C. H. and E. Mazur, "Peer Instruction: Ten years of experience and results." American Journal of Physics 69 (9), 970-977.
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PST2C36:

To What Extent Is Seeing Not Believing?
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Kelly A. Miller, Harvard University
617-495-9616, kmiller@seas.harvard.edu
  Co-Author(s): Nathaniel Lasry, Eric Mazur
  Abstract: Demonstrations are vital components of most undergraduate physics courses. Despite their prominence, research has shown that students learn little, if anything from lecture demos. Worse, some research suggests depending on the delivery, demos can even contribute to students' misconceptions. We analyze one delivery method that requires students' predictions of lecture demonstration outcomes in introductory mechanics and electricity and magnetism at two large research universities. We compare students' predictions before having seen the demonstration to what they report as having observed both right after the demonstration and several weeks later. Students' post-demonstration explanations of the physics behind each demonstration are also analyzed. Triangulation of these data points leads us to better understand how students' pre-instructional beliefs influence their interpretation and memory of physics lecture demonstrations. This can mitigate the "disconnect" that has been shown to exist between what instructors think they are demonstrating and what students actually observe/remember.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C37:

Development Strategies for Interactive Online Learning Environments in Physics^1
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Christopher M. Nakamura
Kansas State University Physics Department
(785) 532-7167, cnakamur@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sytil K. Murphy, Dean A. Zollman, Michael Christel, Scott Stevens
  Abstract: The Pathway Active Learning Environment (PALE) is part of an ongoing program of research aimed at investigating how to use interactive multimedia technology to facilitate online instruction in physics. Our research efforts are in part directed at uncovering and codifying general strategies to develop and implement online learning environments in efficient ways. PALE relies heavily on pre-recorded video both as a means of conveying verbal explanations and as a way of demonstrating physical phenomena. To function optimally it also requires significant input from students. Both of these requirements imply significant amounts of effort over prolonged periods of time are needed to create systems that respond appropriately to students' actions. This effort may be organized and distributed via the Internet by a larger group of developers. In this way an efficient and ongoing development cycle may be implemented. This poster discusses strategies for implementation.
  Footnotes: 1 This work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant numbers REC-0632587 and REC-0632657.
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PST2C38:

The Physics Class: Challenges and Problems in College Teaching in Mexico
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Miguel Olvera Aldana, ESCOM-IPN
52-55-57296000 ext 67748, molveraa@ipn.mx
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This work studies the failures in a class of physics at Superior School on Computing from National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico (ESCOM-IPN), emphasizing that it is the only course of physics in the ESCOM curriculum. On the other hand, it was needed analysis and quantification on the influence of the physics course in the Computational Systems Engineers formation since perspective of developing their thesis. Finally, we show some actions by teachers from the basic science area in ESCOM to decrease these indices and motivate the students, including preparatory courses, problems, books, and electronic notes.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C39:

Using Online Homework Data to Assess Student Confidence
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Joseph D. Peterson, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
608-342-6160, peterson.joseph.d@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Andrew Pawl
  Abstract: A popular type of question in online homework involves a set of several true/false statements where students must submit their answer to all the statements at once. This discourages random guessing because although one true/false statement has only two possible answers, a question containing N such statements has two raised to the Nth power possible answers. We have studied student response patterns to a number of these questions with the goal of determining which of the individual true/false statements exhibit a large proportion of response switches (i.e. from true to false or from false to true) and which statements exhibit largely consistent responses. The tendency of students to change their answer to a statement or to remain consistent is one indication of student confidence in the knowledge tested.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C40:

Perception of Model of Competences in Physics Teaching
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Mario Humberto Ramírez Díaz, CICATA-IPN
52-55-57296000 ext 67748, mramirezd@ipn.mx
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Since the '70s, two concepts from the business world have been adopted by education: innovation and competence. This talk will show how some physics educators are resisting or refusing to adopt the model of competence. This work is based on previous research made in Tabasco, Mexico, and directed to teachers in Law, History, and Sociology. We interviewed physics teachers, both college and high school, to get their opinion and experience with the model of competence. We present evidence about rejecting the model based on negative aspects of using the practice. However, some teachers found positive aspects of the model they can use in their daily practice, which we present in the talk.
  Footnotes: Work supported by COFAA-IPN
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PST2C41:

Reflection about Negative Introduction of Technology in Physics Classes in Mexican Universities
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Mario Humberto Ramírez Díaz, CICATA-IPN
52-55-57296000 ext 67748, mramirezd@ipn.mx
  Co-Author(s): Luis Antonio García Trujillo
  Abstract: In recent years there has been much discussion about the idea that we must improve or optimize the learning processes in the traditional technologies classes. This idea in part has been inspired because of the fact that the new generation of students has grown up with direct technology interaction. However, in our experience as physics teachers in different universities in Mexico, we can't deny that occasionally the incorporation of technologies into the classroom is beneficial, for example we have used graphic software in the physics process, numeric simulations of experimental evidence, or applets available on the web. But, in our experience the students think the problems are monotone, furthermore they don't conceive that a problem could be solved with a mix of equations that describe the physics phenomena. In this work we give reflections on the introduction of technology in the physics class and its negative aspects on students' learning of physics in some universities in Mexico.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C42:

Student Understanding of the Concepts of Substance and Chemical Change*
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Amy D. Robertson, University of Washington
(206) 251-1194, awrob@uw.edu
  Co-Author(s): Peter S. Shaffer, Lillian C McDermott
  Abstract: One of the fundamental notions in basic chemistry is that a chemical change is a process that transforms substances and conserves atoms. As part of a multi-year study on student reasoning about topics related to the particle nature of matter, a set of questions was designed to probe the extent to which university-level chemistry students apply the description of chemical change articulated above. Results from these questions will be presented and compared with results from previous studies involving K-12 students.
  Footnotes: *This work has been supported under a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.
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PST2C43:

Increasing Confidence by Characterizing Self-Efficacy Experience Opportunities
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Vashti Sawtelle, Florida International University
305-968-9311, vashti.sawtelle@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe, Renee Michelle Goertzen, Laird H Kramer
  Abstract: We present the analysis of a qualitative investigation of three women from a Modeling Instruction (MI) classroom completing a problem-solving task as a discussion of self-efficacy experience opportunities (SEOs). Self-efficacy, or confidence in one's own ability to perform a task, has been shown to strongly correlate with persistence and success in science fields. At Florida International University, we have demonstrated that the MI class has a positive impact on introductory students' physics self-efficacy. To further investigate this development, we focus on one of the key elements of the MI classroom: modeling physical phenomena. This presentation will focus on characterizing SEOs and linking them to the development of self-efficacy as well as the Modeling process. Further, we believe this analysis provides a partial explanation for how the MI classroom positively impacts self-efficacy.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C44:

Using Cogenerative Mediation in Classrooms
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Natan Samuels, Florida International University
305-348-3507, nsamu002@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe
  Abstract: This poster will present ongoing research on our cogenerative mediation process for learning environments (CMPLE). Student and teacher participants in CMPLE have the opportunity to be collectively engaged in modifying their learning environment based on their preferences. Our research question is "How does this mediation process help participants negotiate modifications to their learning environment?" We are addressing this question by focusing on both student and teacher participants. Our data includes interviews and classroom artifacts.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C46:

Improving Students' Understanding of Addition of Angular Momentum
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh
412-624-9045, clsingh@pitt.edu
  Co-Author(s): Guangtian Zhu
  Abstract: We are investigating the difficulties that upper-level students taking quantum mechanics have in learning about the addition of angular momentum. To help improve student understanding of these concepts, we have developed quantum interactive learning tutorials (QuILTs) and tools for peer-instruction. We will discuss the common students' difficulties and the effectiveness of research-based tools in improving students' understanding of these concepts. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation grant NSF-PHY-0855424.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C47:

Peer Instruction for Quantum Mechanics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh
412-624-9045, clsingh@pitt.edu
  Co-Author(s): Guangtian Zhu
  Abstract: We are developing and evaluating resource material for "Peer Instruction" in quantum mechanics. A central component of the resource material is research-based concept tests that can be used by instructors as a formative assessment tool. The instructors can use these tools for bridging the gap between the abstract quantitative formalism of quantum mechanics and the qualitative understanding necessary to explain and predict diverse physical phenomena. Asking questions during the lecture and asking students to discuss it with each other before polling the class has already been shown to be effective at the introductory level. This method provides a mechanism to convey the goals of the course and the level of understanding that is desired of students and also helps students monitor their learning. We will discuss the development and assessment of these tools. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF-PHY-0653129).
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C48:

Student Understanding of Taylor Series Expansions in Statistical Mechanics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Trevor I. Smith, University of Maine
207-581-1022, Trevor.I.Smith@umit.maine.edu
  Co-Author(s): John R. Thompson, Donald B. Mountcastle
  Abstract: One goal of physics instruction is to have students learn to make physical meaning of specific mathematical ideas, concepts, and procedures in different physical settings. As part of research investigating student learning in statistical physics, we are developing curriculum materials that guide students through a derivation of the Boltzmann factor, using a Taylor series expansion of entropy. Using results from written surveys, classroom observations, and both individual think-aloud and teaching interviews, we present evidence that, while many students can recognize and interpret series expansions, they often lack fluency with the Taylor series, despite previous exposures in both calculus and physics courses. We present students' successes and failures both using and interpreting Taylor series expansions in a variety of physical contexts.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C49:

Problem Solving in Kinematics as a Measure of Conceptual Understanding
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Daniel M. Smith, Jr., South Carolina State University
803-536-7162, dsmith@scsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Student difficulties in solving kinematics problems are often attributed to students' inability to choose the correct equation, or to weak skills in algebra. Evidence is presented from a calculus-based physics class, however, that students fail to solve problems because they lack a conceptual understanding of the problem, as determined by their ability to relate the problem data to a diagram. The limited roles that--choosing the right equation,-- and weak algebra skills play in problem solving is further explored by having students solve problems graphically by using interactive software designed especially for one-dimensional kinematics problems.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C50:

The Positive Impact of Student Engagement on Learning and Retention
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Adam G. Tournier, McKendree University
(618) 537 - 2140, agtournier@mckendree.edu
  Co-Author(s): Minh Truong
  Abstract: Student engagement in the classroom, laboratory, and outside of traditional course settings has a dramatic and real impact on both conceptual and practical understanding of the material in algebra-based physics courses. The small class sizes available at liberal arts institutions create an environment whereby students can have more access to their professors in all areas of the course. The students that are engaged more frequently in the classroom and lab setting have a more profound understanding of the material both conceptually and in application. Students who are engaged outside of the traditional course setting with both their instructors and peers demonstrate the greatest understanding and retention of the course material.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C51:

Is This Good Teaching? Assessment Challenges for Both Faculty and Institutions
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Chandra A. Turpen, Western Michigan University
303.817.0250, Chandra.Turpen@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Charles Henderson, Melissa Dancy
  Abstract: As part of a larger research study, we focus on the investigation of barriers to instructional change. One significant barrier that has emerged is that neither faculty nor their institutions know how to evaluate student learning (or teaching effectiveness) in introductory physics courses. In this poster, we will present results from telephone interviews with 70 physics faculty related to how faculty and their institutions evaluate teaching effectiveness. We will focus on the following research questions: 1) What information is gathered about instructors? teaching and students? learning? 2) How is this information used? 3) How are different sources of information perceived or valued by faculty? Helping faculty (and possibly institutions) make judgments about whether their instruction is working may be an integral part of supporting efforts to improve undergraduate physics instruction.
  Footnotes: Supported, in part, by NSF Award No. 0715698
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PST2C52:

TAs' Judgments about Student Problem-solving Difficulties
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Joshua S. Von Korff, Kansas State University
785-532-1612, vonkorff@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Dehui Hu, N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: Physics education researchers commonly judge students' behavior as "novice" or "expert" behavior. How do TAs make similar judgments about student problem solving ability? We report on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of focus group interview data from a study of TA discussions. In our study, TAs analyzed student problem solving, by reading transcripts of conversations and trying to anticipate or explain student difficulties. Our study classifies TAs' judgments about student problem solving using the "novice-centered" and "expert-centered" axis. We also consider Tas' justifications for their claims, and other features of their discussion. We describe the relative frequency of these different ways of speaking, both for individual Tas and in the aggregate.
  Footnotes: This work is supported in part by U.S. National Science Foundation grant 0816207.
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PST2C53:

Exploring Student Interpretations of Worked Examples
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Judy Vondruska,
605-688-5859, Judy.Vondruska@sdstate.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This project will present results of a qualitative research study undertaken in the spring of 2011 which focused on how students interacted with worked problem examples in physics and the level to which they understood the worked examples. While many textbook publishers are now providing worked examples in various forms with varying degrees of explanation and interactivity, it is unclear to what extent these are truly useful to the learner. This study undertakes the effort to explore this level of understanding more deeply.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C54:

Development of a Standardized Fluids Assessment
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - DJ Wagner, Grove City College
724-301-1205, djwagner@gcc.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sam Cohen, Adam Moyer, Jason Wetstone, Elizabeth Carbone
  Abstract: We are developing an FCI-style assessment covering hydrostatic topics commonly included in introductory physics courses. Students from all three introductory tracks (conceptual-, trig-, and calculus-based) at Grove City College have completed draft versions of our assessment, both pre- and post-instruction, and we are ready to distribute a beta version for testing by other institutions. This poster will present the assessment, along with analysis of the questions and plans for the future. We're particularly interested in receiving suggestions from other educators and in recruiting beta-testers. Stop by and chat!
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C55:

Math Preparation for Under-prepared Students in Physics Courses
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Jing Wang, Eastern Kentucky University
859-6221526, jing.wang@eku.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jerry Cook
  Abstract: Previous studies suggest that students enrolled in introductory physics courses are usually not well prepared in mathematical skills. Math placement tests and course prerequisites are the two frequently adopted methods in dealing with the issue. Unsatisfied by either method, the Department of Physics and Astronomy (PHAS) at Eastern Kentucky University (EKU) decides to offer an alternative solution by offering an auxiliary short course taken concurrently with introductory physics. Recommendations are made to students with relatively-low math pre-test scores. However, the course is open to anyone who is taking introductory physics. This work will discuss PHAS's practice of assisting math-unprepared students through this course called Success in College Physics.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C56:

Using Computer Coaches for Problem Solving to Explore Student Decision-making Difficulties
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Qing Xu, University of Minnesota-Twin cities
6126259323, qxu@physics.umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): Ken Heller, Leon Hsu, Andrew Mason
  Abstract: The Physics Education Group at the University of Minnesota has been developing Internet physics coaches to help students improve their problem-solving skills in introductory physics. In this poster, we will show the keystroke data collected from students' usage of the computer programs, including the identity and timing information for all students' keystrokes and mouse clicks while using the programs, as well as derived information such as the average time spent on each module. We use the data to try to determine how students use the computer programs, where they might have the most difficulty, and details of their decision-making behavior during the problem-solving process. Other data sources such as students' written solutions will be used as a consistency check.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C57:

Correlation between FCI Gains and Interactive Engagement
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Philip W. Young, University of Wisconsin - Platteville
(608)342-1406, youngp@uwplatt.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Introductory physics classes at the University of Wisconsin - Platteville moved from a traditional lecture hall environment to studio classrooms in spring 2009. To assess the transition, we have been administering the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) to all sections of calculus-based Physics I beginning in spring 2008. We have also defined an Interactive Engagement Index (IEI) for each section. This index is based on self-reported information on six factors: time spent lecturing; student engagement with concepts, problem solving, and hands-on learning activities; the degree of integration of the lab with the lecture; and large-group discussions. The correlation between FCI gain and IEI for all 20 sections between S08 and F10 is 0.92. This poster will present details on the IEI, update the data to include in spring 2011, and look at the correlation in more depth. This work was supported by NSF-DUE CCLI 0633583.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C58:

Students' Difficulties with Scalar Multiplication of a Vector and Vector Subtraction
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Genaro Zavala, Tecnologico de Monterrey
528183582000, x4631, genaro.zavala@itesm.mx
  Co-Author(s): Pablo Barniol
  Abstract: In this work we investigate students' understanding of: 1) scalar multiplication of a vector and, 2) vector subtraction. We administered two tests to 717 students completing introductory physics courses at a private Mexican university. In the first part, we used a modified version of a problem designed by Van Deventer [1] to investigate students' difficulties with multiplication of a vector by a positive scalar and we designed a problem to study students' difficulties with multiplication of a vector by a negative scalar. We compared the frequencies of the errors in these two problems to comprehend students' conceptions in these vector operations. In the second part, we designed a vector subtraction problem and identified errors that haven´t been reported in the literature.
  Footnotes: [1] J. Van Deventer, Comparing student performance on isomorphic math and physics vector representations, Master?s Thesis, The University of Maine, 2008.
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PST2C59:

New Pictorial Representations and Supporting Text of Sound Standing Waves of Air Columns in a Tube
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Liang Zeng, The University of Texas-Pan American
9566652169, zengl@utpa.edu
  Co-Author(s): Corpuz Edgar, Chris Smith, Jennifer Rodriguez
  Abstract: New pictorial representations of sound standing waves of air columns in a tube were drawn for the first three harmonics in an open-open tube as well as in an open-closed tube. Supporting text describing air molecule motion over time was also provided. These representations and supporting text were designed to reveal the main characteristics of the physical mechanisms of sound standing waves in these two different types of tubes. Through a pilot study utilizing surveys and student interviews, we investigated the differences in the effects on student learning of underlying physics concepts between the new pictorial representations and the existing ones in an introductory physics textbook. The implications of our results for teaching were discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C60:

Students' Ability in Constructing Formal Logical Reasoning
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Shaona Zhou, South China Normal University
614-292-2450 , zhou.shaona@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Hua Xiao, Jing Han, Kathy Koenig, Lei Bao
  Abstract: While students seem to easily pick up the valid variables in a context of multi-variable situations, they often have difficulty in constructing the correct logical relations between variables and outcomes. This research investigated students' understanding about two kinds of logical thinking involving conditional relations. We found that students' reasoning in situations involving necessary conditions outperformed their reasoning involving sufficient conditions. Results from students at different grade levels showed steady improvement with age on picking the correct variables, while their logical thinking had no obvious changes. The results suggest that logical thinking is a higher level scientific reasoning ability that doesn't fully develop through our current education which emphasizes content knowledge.
  Footnotes: **Supported in part by NIH Award RC1RR028402 and NSF Awards DUE-0633473 and DUE-1044724
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PST2C61:

Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Measurement
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Guangtian Zhu, University of Pittsburgh
412-251-3716, zhuguangtian@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Chandralekha Singh
  Abstract: The measurement of a physical observable in a quantum system is very different from the measurement in a classical system. Understanding the properties of quantum measurement is essential for interpreting quantum mechanics. We investigate the students' difficulties related to the quantum measurement by giving written tests and interviewing advanced undergraduate and graduate students in the quantum mechanics class. We also discuss the students' improvement of interpreting quantum measurement after they use the research-based learning tools. Our data shows that the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) and Peer Instruction Tools will enhance students' understanding of the quantum measurement. *Supported by NSF
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C62:

Surveying Students' Understanding of Quantum Mechanics
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Guangtian Zhu, University of Pittsburgh
412-251-3716, zhuguangtian@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Chandralekha Singh
  Abstract: Development of conceptual multiple-choice tests related to a particular physics topic is important for designing research-based learning tools to reduce the difficulties. We explore the difficulties that the advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with non-relativistic quantum mechanics of one particle in one spatial dimension. We developed a research-based conceptual multiple-choice survey that targets these issues to obtain information about the common difficulties and administered it to more than a hundred students from seven different institutions. The issues targeted in the survey include the set of possible wavefunctions, bound and scattering states, quantum measurement, expectation values, the role of the Hamiltonian, time-dependence of wavefunction and time-dependence of expectation value. We find that the advanced undergraduate and graduate students have many common difficulties with these concepts and that research-based tutorials and peer-instruction tools can significantly reduce these difficulties. The survey can be administered to assess the effectiveness of various intructional strategies. *Supported by NSF
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C63:

Student-Generated Diagrams for Understanding Chemical Equations
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - Dyan L. McBride, Mercyhurst College
814-969-6917, dmcbride@mercyhurst.edu
  Co-Author(s): Reni Roseman
  Abstract: It is clear that students have difficulty creating a physical interpretation of equations. This project is part of a larger study involving the interactions of physics, math, and chemistry learning. In this poster, we present findings from a study of student-generated diagrams that represent chemical equations. The results of the study indicate that while many students have difficulty creating representations of the equations, they are able to adapt and improve their model to include a variety of features.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C64:

ViPER: A Possible Model for Solo Physics Education Researchers
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 6:00PM - 6:45PM
  Author: Poster - Scott W. Bonham, Western Kentucky University
(270)745-6196, scott.bonham@wku.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jing Wang, Jon Gaffney
  Abstract: The Kentucky Virtual Physics Education Research (ViPER) group was formed in August 2010 by three solo physics education researchers in the state. Using Web 2.0 tools as well as periodic face-to-face gatherings, we conduct regular group meetings, share literature and data, and work collaboratively on several projects. The collaboration provides many of the benefits of a larger research group, such as complementary research skills, mentoring, interviewing each other's students, critical feedback and sharing resources. ViPER also significantly reduces the isolation we would have otherwise experienced as solo physics education researchers. These initial activities have been supported by a PERLOC mini grant and the chairs of our respective departments, and we are currently applying for larger collaborative grants. In this poster we will share specifics about how we conduct our virtual research group and what we believe to be the key factors, making it a model for other solo PER faculty.
  Footnotes: None
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PST2C65:

Three Undergraduate Experiments in Rubidium-Argon Collision Spectroscopy
  Location: KFC Courts
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 5:15PM - 6:00PM
  Author: Poster - David A. Olsgaard, Simpson College
515-961-1829, david.olsgaard@simpson.edu
  Co-Author(s): Mike Henry, Austin Roy, Tayler Buresh
  Abstract: Many laser spectroscopy experiments utilizing rubidium vapor cells have been demonstrated in the undergraduate laboratory. We introduce three new undergraduate spectroscopy experiments using rubidium vapor cells back-filled with an argon buffer gas. These experiments introduce students to the role elastic and inelastic collisions can play in the absorption and emission spectrum of atoms. The first experiment is a dramatic demonstration of hyperfine optical pumping aided by velocity-changing collisions with the buffer gas in which we observe 100% transfer of population to one hyperfine level. The second experiment shows an unexpected modification of the rubidium fluorescence spectrum as a function of argon pressure and laser intensity. A simplified 3-level rate equation model predicts the unusual feature. The third experiment is the observation of a decrease in the excited state lifetime of the 6P3/2 level as function of buffer gas pressure. A Stern-Volmer plot yields the inelastic collision cross-section.
  Footnotes: None
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