National Meeting Program Schedule

2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Wednesday, August 03

 

Total Number of Records Found: 125

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Crkrbrl06:

  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 12:00PM - 1:00PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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Crkrbrl07:

  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 12:00PM - 1:00PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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Crkrbrl08:

  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 12:00PM - 1:00PM
  Author: TBA
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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FA:

PER: Investigating Classroom Strategies II
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 9:50AM
  Presider: Warren Christensen,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FA01:

Collaboration Among Local Colleges to Build a Community of Expertise
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:10AM
  Author: Dedra Demaree, Oregon State University
541-207-4401, demareed@physics.oregonstate.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sissi Li, Dennis Gilbert, Greg Mulder
  Abstract: In summer 2010, Oregon State University (OSU) received an NSF grant in collaboration with local community colleges (CC) to build pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The purpose of this project is three-fold: to better coordinate our introductory courses, to develop and share the best of our curricular activities, and to document the shared knowledge in a way that helps incoming/rotating instructors adopt the courses. There is a large number of students who transfer between OSU and the CC's, and there is terrific reformed teaching (with common reform goals) going on at all three institutions with documented success. However, the professors with the most expertise teach only a fraction of the students within the system. This talk will discuss how we are sharing and documenting instructional knowledge and course materials to build a community of expertise that can pass PCK more readily to new instructors.
  Footnotes: None
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FA02:

Developing Beliefs and Attitudes about Doing Physics in Introductory Classes
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:10AM - 8:20AM
  Author: Sissi L. Li, Oregon State University
541-737-1724, lisi@onid.orst.edu
  Co-Author(s): Dedra N. Demaree
  Abstract: Learning to do physics is more than knowing the concepts and solving homework problems. Scientists know that doing science requires the conceptual understanding, problem solving, and critical thinking skills as tools; moreover, doing science is more than just using those tools, it also involves having appropriate attitudes and beliefs about doing science. These attitudes and beliefs include curiosity, skepticism, tenacity, creativity, and more. To examine how these attitudes are developed, we selected three teachers who teach calculus-based introductory college physics at a large research university and two community colleges. We observed their lecture classes, and conducted post-class interviews and student interviews. Through these three case studies, we will present how teachers build a learning community to support learners in developing beliefs and attitude for doing physics.
  Footnotes: None
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FA03:

Transforming Assessment to Achieve and Measure Preparation for Future Learning
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:20AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Yuhfen Lin, Florida International University
732-763-9929, fireflylin@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): David T. Brookes
  Abstract: One way to measure transfer is through assessing preparation for future learning, but how many of us are brave enough to test our students' ability to learn by giving them an exam question on a topic we have not covered? At the same time, have our physics classes prepared them for their future learning? When we gave our students a question on a brand new topic as their final exam, we wanted to believe they could learn on their own. They demonstrated not only the ability to find the correct equation to solve the problem, but they also were not satisfied until they were able to achieve deeper understanding by making sense of the new knowledge in terms of their current understanding. In the next talk, we will provide more details of how we created a learning environment that encouraged students to take charge of their own learning.
  Footnotes: None
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FA04:

Building a Sustainable Learning Environment in a Physics Classroom
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: David T. Brookes, Florida International University
848-391-0527, dbrookes@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Yuhfen Lin
  Abstract: In the words of Sugata Mitra, “Education is a self-organizing system, where learning is an emergent phenomenon.” If we take this to the extreme: good teaching has little to do with what we teach or how we teach it. What we should be concerned with is designing a learning environment that will encourage the spontaneous emergence of learning. In this talk I will present a) some initial ideas about how we can model a physics course as a self organizing system, and b) an ongoing two-year experiment to design a physics learning environment that promotes emergent learning. Our initial results show that students are learning the content at a level that is comparable to other reformed courses, developing positive attitudes toward physics, and developing their identities as learners, knowers, and physicists. Most importantly, students have developed the ability to learn on their own.
  Footnotes: None
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FA05:

Beyond the Standard Pedagogical Model
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: Paul J. Camp, Spelman College
404-270-5864, pcamp@spelman.edu
  Co-Author(s): Michael Burns-Kaurin, Derrick Hylton, Natarajan Ravi, Marta Dark-McNeese
  Abstract: For several years, the physics department at Spelman College has used project-based instruction as a central focus of our curriculum at all levels. This presentation will describe our work on the second-semester introductory course, in which we have moved all of the circuits material to a project-based investigation conducted entirely in the lab. There are several important differences between our implementation and similar efforts such as Workshop Physics, notably the use of complex, ill-formed problems as a central focus of the pedagogy, the use of distributed expertise to drive collaboration and communication, and the improvement of process skills through iterative refinement. We will describe the foundations of our pedagogical design in cognitive and learning science and previous similar efforts in other learning contexts, contrast it with other inquiry-based designs, and describe some of what we are observing in the test and comparison classes. Data collection and processing is currently ongoing so this presentation will necessarily focus more on the design rationale than on the results.
  Footnotes: None
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FA06:

Adopt, Adapt, or Abandon? Instructors' Decisions to Use Research-based Materials
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Stephanie V. Chasteen, University of Colorado - Boulder
3037753277, stephanie.chasteen@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Rachel E. Pepper, Steven J Pollock, Katherine K Perkins
  Abstract: Physics education researchers often develop materials for classroom use. Instructors then choose which of those materials they would like to implement. We present a case study of University of Colorado's transformed junior E&M course. After the transformation work in Sp/Fa 2008, four subsequent instructors of this course decided which materials -- such as tutorials, clicker questions, or use of documented student difficulties -- to use. Based on detailed interviews of those instructors, we examine what was and was not sustained, and discuss aspects of the course materials that enabled sustainability across instructors. We also present examples of less successful implementation that provide useful feedback on the use of PER-based resources -- both for educational researchers and for the instructors making use of these instructional techniques.
  Footnotes: All junior level resources are available at http://www.colorado.edu/sei/departments/physics_3310.htm. This work was funded by CU?s Science Education Initiative and the National Science Foundation Grant No. 0737118.
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FA07:

Assessing the Algebra-based Electricity and Magnetism Studio: First Steps
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Jacquelyn J Chini, University of Central Florida
407-823-3607, jchini@physics.ucf.edu
  Co-Author(s): Archana Dubey
  Abstract: The studio mode of learning combines the lecture, laboratory, and recitation components of a traditional course in an integrated, student-centered environment. Others have demonstrated the success of studio in introductory calculus-based physics. However, there have been fewer studies on the effectiveness of this strategy for algebra-based physics courses. In spring 2011, one instructor was assigned to teach both studio-mode and traditional sections of the second semester introductory algebra-based physics course at the University of Central Florida. We discuss the differences between the ways one instructor taught the same content in these two formats. Having the same instructor for both the studio and lecture courses allows for comparison between these formats without variations introduced by individual instructors. We begin to assess the effectiveness of our algebra-based studio by comparing the performance of students from these sections in common tasks, including the Survey of Electricity, Magnetism, Circuits and Optics (SEMCO) and quizzes.
  Footnotes: None
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FA08:

Implementation of Research-based Instructional Strategies: Report from a Longitudinal Study of 15 Junior Faculty
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Melissa Dancy, University of Colorado
704-763-0125, melissa.dancy@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Charles Henderson
  Abstract: As part of a continuing research program to better understand barriers and identify affordances toward increasing research-based teaching practices among university physics faculty, we have embarked on a five-semester study of 15 diverse faculty who recently participated in the Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshop. Data collected includes: pre- and post-semester interviews, periodic web-based surveys, and collection of teaching artifacts. In this talk we will share findings from the first year of the study focused on the experiences faculty had with the New Faculty Workshop, what aspects of the workshop they decided to integrate into their teaching, how they went about implementing new ideas, and the outcomes of their efforts.
  Footnotes: None
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FA09:

Teaching Mathematical Physics through Problem-based Learning
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Gintaras Duda, Creighton University
402-280-5730, gkduda@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Problem-based and project-based learning (PBL) are two pedagogical techniques that have several clear advantages over traditional instructional methods: 1) both techniques are active and student centered, 2) students confront real-world and/or highly complex problems, and 3) such exercises model the way science and engineering are done professionally. This talk will present an experiment in project/problem-based learning in a mathematical physics course and an attempt (still in its infancy) to deliver an upper division physics course completely in the problem/project based format. More specifically, one group project in the course involved modeling a zombie outbreak of the type seen in AMC's ``The Walking Dead.'' Students researched, devised, and solved their mathematical models for the spread of zombie-like infection. Results of student interviews and surveys will be presented as well as an instructor's perspective on using PBL in upper division physics courses.
  Footnotes: None
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FA10:

'Implicit Action' -- Understanding Discourse Management in Modeling Instruction
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Jared L. Durden, Florida International University
417 988-1765, jdurd001@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe, Laird Kramer
  Abstract: We identify "Implicit Action," a discourse management tool, through a qualitative video analysis of a Florida International University Modeling Instruction Introductory Physics I class. Implicit Action in Modeling Instruction is where instructors deliberately create intellectual space in which students ideally see value and need for the construction of new classroom norms and tools that are productive in developing a learning community. This space is created by the implications expressed through the instructors' deliberate actions. Modeling Discourse Management is a technique to moderate student discussion in Modeling Instruction classes at the university level (Desbien, 2002). Implicit Action is one of eight Modeling Discourse Management tools that we have identified and, by means of qualitative analysis, have illustrated the effectiveness of its ability to implement Modeling Pedagogical Theory.
  Footnotes: None
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FA11:

Increasing the Impact of PER: Recommendations from Typical Faculty
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Charles R. Henderson, Western Michigan University
2693874951, charles.henderson@wmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Melissa H. Dancy, Chandra Turpen, Ramón Barthelemy
  Abstract: In previous work [1,2], we found that most physics faculty in the United States are familiar with and value instructional strategies based on Physics Education Research (PER). Yet, we also found that use of these strategies lags considerably behind knowledge. We have attempted to understand this gap between knowledge and use from several perspectives. In this talk we will explore this issue from the perspective of typical faculty. As part of a larger study, we conducted telephone interviews with 70 physics faculty who indicated that they had some exposure to PER. Based on these conversations, we describe the actions faculty recommended that the PER community might take in order to have more of an impact on the teaching practices of typical faculty.
  Footnotes: Supported, in part, by NSF Award No. 0715698. 1. Henderson, C. & Dancy, M. (2009) The Impact of Physics Education Research on the Teaching of Introductory Quantitative Physics in the United States, Physical Review Special Topics: Physics Education Research, 5 (2), 020107. 2. Dancy, M. & Henderson, C. (2010) Pedagogical Practices and Instructional Change of Physics Faculty, American Journal of Physics, Physics, 78 (10), 1056-1063.
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FB:

Teaching Physics Around the World
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Gordon Aubrecht,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FB01:

Physics Teacher Certification in Brazil: Who Said Reforming Is Easy?
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - Katemari Rosa, Columbia University, Teachers College
3478678905, kdr2109@tc.columbia.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: One of the fundamental questions to improve physics education is related to teacher education, particularly physics teacher's certification programs. In the United States, these programs vary not only in their curriculum but in their format and requirements. This presentation brings the contribution of a distinct tradition for preparing physics teachers, providing ideas for new experiences. Specifically, we examine the curriculum reform of a physics teacher certification program in Brazil, focusing on the process of the reform, and how physics education research informed the creating of new disciplines, the departmental debate, and the development of a new view for the role of a physics educator. Our goal is to take the physics teacher education discussion to all the professionals involved in this process, not only curriculum experts, share our failures and success, and establish a venue for expertise exchange between Brazil and United States.
  Footnotes: None
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FB02:

Stimulating Creative Ideas and Developing Self-learning Ability of Freshman Students
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Zhi-Yong Zhou
Physics Department, Southeast University, China
13913871729, zhouzhy@seu.edu.cn
  Co-Author(s): Ying-Hui Kuang, Hui Zhong, Ying Yun
  Abstract: Creative ideas and the ability to do independent study are important characteristics for students to be successful in their university lives and careers thereafter. These two aspects are also what we wish to cultivate in freshman students through "Introduction to Bilingual Physics," which was designed by Prof. Ying Yun for physical engineering students. The main contexts about classical and modern physics are organized through the "key line" method and are introduced in several ways, including blackboard presentations, multimedia materials, experiment demonstrations, and network simulations. Following that, students are encouraged and guided to do scientific research with suitable complexity by working in a self-organized group, and then they are asked and selected to present their ideas or discoveries in class and even at international occasions. This teaching model has proven to be effective over a 10-year teaching practice, during which the performance of the students has been tracked.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Prof. Lei Bao
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FB03:

The Global Laboratory at SUNY Oswego
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Shashi M. Kanbur, SUNY Oswego
315 312 2212, shashi.kanbur@oswego.edu
  Co-Author(s): Cleane L. Medeiros, Lorrie Clemo, Deborah Stanley, Webe Kadima
  Abstract: A key competency required for graduates in today's highly competitive job market is skill in solving science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) based problems in an international context. Increasingly, scientific and technological innovations occur as a result of teams of multinational researchers working in many different global settings. The Global Laboratory at SUNY Oswego aims to provide our undergraduates with these skills by providing 6-8 week STEM-based cutting-edge research experiences at a number of leading research driven universities worldwide (UFPB, UFAL, UFMGS in Brazil; Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India; National Central University, Taiwan; University of Kinshasha, DRC). As a specific example, between 2011-2013, we will take six students per summer to work on cutting-edge astrophysics research projects at the Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Taiwan. In this talk, we describe the pedagogical/cultural/cognitive benefits to students and our plans to expand the Global Laboratory.
  Footnotes: Andrew Crouse
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FB04:

Quantum Entanglement and its Application
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Ying-Hong Zhao
Chieng-Shiung Wu College,Southeast University
+86-15951077020, 213102517@seu.edu.cn
  Co-Author(s): Xiao-Jiao Yuan, Jin Guo
  Abstract: Nowadays, the discussion about the inharmony between the local effect of relativity and the non-local effect of quantum mechanics raised by quantum entanglement has become one of the most difficult problems in physics. By taking a course called Bilingual Physics with Multimedia last semester, we have some new ideas about independent and explorative study. Inspired by the concept of education, we decided to study quantum entanglement and its application from a freshman's view. This essay mainly talks about exploring the history of quantum entanglement, the basic principles and the experimental facilities of quantum teleportation, as well as the latest scientific development on it. At last, we conclude that the exploration of science as endless and we also come up with some deep thoughts about the coming era of quantum information.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Prof. Lei Bao.
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FB05:

My Experience with Physics Students and Teachers in Vietnam
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Asim Gangopadhyaya, Loyola University Chicago
773-508-3541, agangop@luc.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: During this summer I hope to have an opportunity to meet with teachers and students in South Vietnam. In particular, I would like to see their curricula and compare it with ours, and with an older curriculum in India that I am familiar with. I would also like to find out their way of teaching and see whether it has substantial differences from ours.
  Footnotes: None
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FB06:

Computer Simulations in Promoting Physics in Jamaica
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:50AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Michael Ponnambalam, University of the West Indies
876-927-2480, michael.ponnambalam@uwimona.edu.jm
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: After attending an AAPT Workshop in the Summer Meeting of 2006, we had our first computer-simulation-based experiment in the Algebra-based Freshman Physics course in November 2006, using two borrowed computers. The success of that venture led us to a Virtual Lab with 25 computers by October 2008. The use of the computer simulations in promoting the teaching of physics to the university students as well as in enhancing physics outreach to high schools, and even to the primary schools, will be discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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FC:

Innovative Labs for Introductory Courses
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:50AM
  Presider: Tim Grove,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FC01:

The Mash-up Report: A New Physics Lab Assessment Tool
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Larry Bortner, University Of Cincinnati
513-556-2249, bortnelj@ucmail.uc.edu
  Co-Author(s): Carol Fabby
  Abstract: We have developed an online, partial credit multiple choice lab report designed to reduce the student's composition time and virtually eliminate the grader's time. For each section of the report (called a centort), students are presented with snippets that have been previously graded with a rubric, with at least one choice for each level of the rubric. Each snippet is drawn randomly from a pool so that no two students have the same choices for the full centort. Grading is automatic but can be withheld from the student until after a submission deadline.
  Footnotes: None
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FC02:

Introductory E&M Labs Based on Challenge Projects
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: Michael Burns-Kaurin, Spelman College
404-270-5849, mburns-k@spelman.edu
  Co-Author(s): Paul Camp, Derrick Hylton, Marta McNeese, Natarajan Ravi
  Abstract: We changed the structure of the laboratory portion of the second semester of the calculus-based introductory course to center on two challenge projects, the design of the wiring for a house and the construction of a simple radio. Each challenge is broken down into sub-challenges that each include rounds of planning, performing, analyzing, and interpreting experiments. Moreover, each group typically performs a different experiment and shares the outcome with other groups (distributed expertise). Although the experiments end up similar to the experiments students performed before this change, the experiments are now in the context of complex, ill-formed problems, with the goal of improving the students' skills in the actual process of scientific investigation. This presentation will focus on the implementation of this approach, including some discussion of instructors' impressions and assessment of content knowledge; another presentation will focus on the rationale for this structure. Supported by NSF-CCLI DUE-0837216.
  Footnotes: None
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FC03:

Video-based Introductory Mechanics Labs Learning Effects
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Sergio Flores, University of Juarez
(915) 422-3294, seflores@uacj.mx
  Co-Author(s): Juan Ernesto Chavez, Luis Leobardo Alfaro, Maria Dolores Gonzalez, Sergio Miguel Terrazas
  Abstract: Many introductory physics students have understanding problems when they try to learn physics concepts through the knowledge mathematical representations during lab sessions. The research group named Physics and Mathematics in Context from the University of Ciudad, Juarez, Mexico, has developed a research approach based on videos to detect, analyze, and categorize students' understanding of problems to recognize and learn the properties of concepts such as forces as vectors. These videos are projected during the lab sessions to allow a direct interaction between the object knowledge (physical concepts) and the knowledge subject (the students). These videos show the materials, instruments, procedures, and the corresponding description of the cognitive and physical abilities students demand to develop the labs successfully. This didactic design is based on the theories of mathematical representations and visualization. We will show and describe samples of these videos and the corresponding learning effects found during lab sessions.
  Footnotes: None
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FC04:

The Physics of Rube Goldberg
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Joseph L. Nothnagel, McHenry County College
815-337-5861, joenothnagel@comcast.net
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The popular 1963 board game "Mouse Trap" provided the inspiration for a creative assessment of the first two semesters of a three-semester calculus-based physics course. The game was fashioned from the cartoon images created by Rube Goldberg. The Merriam-Webster dictionary adopted the word "Rube Goldberg" as an adjective defined as accomplishing something simple through complex means. Physics is laden with "complex means" exemplified in the myriad of equations introduced in the first two semesters of classic physics. The lab involves the construction on paper of a "Mouse Trap." Twenty independent steps are to be constructed leading to the dropping of a net on the mouse. Each step must be one of the many equations studied in classic physics. The utility of the equation demonstrated in the action within each step along with complete calculations will be used to validate sufficient input force to output force to move from one step to the next of the mouse trap.
  Footnotes: None
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FC05:

Lab Experiments Using Radioisotopes with Wide Range of Half-Lives
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: John E. Tansil
Dept. of Physics, Southeast Missouri State University
573.450.4462, jtansil@semo.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: There are two common techniques for experimentally determining the half-life of a radioisotope. The first method involves measuring activity as a function of time and is limited to isotopes whose half-lives are short compared to time of measurement, yet long enough so that activity is well above background during time of measurement (a few minutes in a typical lab period). The second method is for long-lived isotopes and requires measuring activity and calculating the number of radioactive atoms from the known chemical composition of the sample. We have been using two radioisotopes whose half-lives differ by a factor of E14. The short-lived radioisotope is Barium-177m (T = 2.55 min) and the long-lived radioisotope is naturally occurring Potassium-40 (T = 1.277 E9 yr) which is found in a variety of common potassium compounds. We will discuss specific procedures with these lab experiments and how they fit in the overall nuclear science curriculum.
  Footnotes: None
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FC06:

Teaching Physics Related to an Early Attempt at Medical Imaging
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Dean A. Zollman, Kansas State University
785-532-1619, dzollman@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sytil K. Murphy, Ebone B Pierce, Johannes v.d. Wirjawan
  Abstract: When President Garfield was shot on July 2, 1881, physicians could not determine the location of the bullet. Alexander Graham Bell proposed that he use his newly invented telephone and another relatively new development, the induction balance, to locate it [1]. This early attempt at nonintrusive medical imaging ultimately failed. The apparatus provides students with a way to learn several aspects of electromagnetism and AC circuits in a context that should be motivating to medical students who are studying physics. Even the reasons for the failure are directly related to understanding magnetic fields. Our progress toward developing a teaching activity on this topic has included creating an induction balance with readily available materials and detecting the location of hidden pieces of metal. This project is funded by NSF under grant DUE 04-26754.
  Footnotes: 1. Alexander Graham Bell ?Upon the Electrical Experiments to determine the location of the Bullet in the body of the late President Garfield and upon the successful form of Induction Balance for the painless detection of Metallic Mass in the Human Body? The American Journal of Science 25, 22-61, 1883
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FC07:

Using a WiiMote to Track Multiple Objects in Two Dimensions
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Eric Ayars, California State University, Chico
(530) 898-6967, ayars@mailaps.org
  Co-Author(s): Kyle Scully, Alex Skeffington
  Abstract: We will present a method of using the built-in camera on a Wii game controller with LabVIEW to track two-dimensional motion of up to four objects simultaneously in real time. We will show you how to do it (it's CHEAP!) and demonstrate some potential applications of this method to introductory lab experiments.
  Footnotes: None
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FC08:

Terminal Velocity of High-Altitude Balloon Payloads: Experiment Versus Theory
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Paul Seifert, Concordia College
218-299-4612, seifert@cord.edu
  Co-Author(s): Gordon McIntosh
  Abstract: The terminal velocity of a high-altitude balloon payload descending under a parachute can be calculated using the Prandtl expression for the drag force and knowing the force of gravity (weight) on the payload. A simple model of the terminal velocity versus altitude has been developed, accounting for the changing density of the atmosphere during descent. This model will be compared to the actual terminal velocity of payloads launched by the University of Minnesota, Morris and ConHAB (Concordia College) balloon groups. We will also compare results between our two different parachute designs. The model and flight data will be used to develop an undergraduate laboratory activity illustrating differences between experimental real-world data and theoretically modeled data.
  Footnotes: None
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FD:

Physics and Society Education
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Art Hobson,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FD01:

Dammit, Jim (Cameron), I'm a Screenwriter, Not a Physicist!
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - Ann G. Merchant, National Academies
202-334-3117, amerchan@nas.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Science at its best is adventurous, creative, imaginative, and passionate. Indeed, given its propensity to explore uncharted territory, science is often the basis for provocative and compelling storylines in both film and television. But beyond good storytelling, entertainment channels possess the very real ability to affect opinions, inform ideas, and even change behavior. Recognizing the power of the popular media to shape society's outlook, in 2008 the National Academy of Sciences launched a new program called The Science & Entertainment Exchange to facilitate the connections between the entertainment industry and top scientists from around the country who can help bring the reality of engaging science to the creative arts. With more than 250 consultations to its credit, The Exchange has spent the last few years working with screenwriters, directors, producers, and set designers to bring more -- and better -- science to theaters and living rooms around the country.
  Footnotes: None
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FD02:

Using the Performing Arts in Education and Communication of Science
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Brian Schwartz
The Graduate Center of the City University of New York
(212) 817-7521, bschwartz@gc.cuny.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: For the past 10 years, the author and his colleagues have been operating an outreach program for students and the public based on the theme of Science & the Performing Arts. Formal evaluations of the program indicate that using the performing arts to educate and communicate science is very effective in gaining the interest of students and a new audience of adults, typically not biased towards science. Approximately 10 events are presented each year under the heading Science & the Arts (see http://web.gc.cuny.edu/sciart). In this paper, we include results from an international conference held at the Graduate Center of CUNY in October 2010. The conference had invited sessions on the following themes: 1- Science and Theater; 2- Science and Dance; 3- Science and Music; 4- Science and Films, TV and Radio and 5- Science Festivals and Science Cafes. The program and videorecording of the sessions can be found at www.sciartconference2010.com .
  Footnotes: None
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FD03:

Global Energy Resources: An Interdisciplinary, General Education Course
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Ernest R. Behringer, Eastern Michigan University
734-487-8799, ebehringe@emich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Margaret A. Crouch, Rhonda K. Longworth
  Abstract: During fall 2010, we taught a new interdisciplinary course entitled Global Energy Resources: Physics, Philosophy, and Policy. This course fulfills a general education requirement in the area of global awareness. Students were introduced to energy concepts and technologies, theories of distributive justice, and national and international institutions that set and enforce policy, all applied to the distribution and use of global energy resources. Students were asked to complete homework assignments, in-class activities, a midterm exam, a group project, and a final exam. The group project included an oral presentation and written report describing a plan to manage the energy resources of a foreign nation from the present time through 2020. A detailed description of the course will be given, along with a summary of successes and challenges.
  Footnotes: None
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FD04:

Energy and Public Policy: A Course in Science and Government
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Walter F. Cuirle, U.S. House Page School
202-225-9023, walter.cuirle@mail.house.gov
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: "Energy and Public Policy" is a one-semester science elective offered by the Page School of the U.S. House of Representatives. The course is a form of project-oriented inquiry: working in small groups, students pick a problem in the area of energy or the environment that they think can be solved by legislation, then they write the legislation. The focus on legislation changes the character of the syllabus. Students want to learn the science they need to solve their problem and they prefer to learn it in the order in which questions arise in their legislative process. The course does not use a conventional textbook. Instead, students are given an electronic library of documents of the sort they might use if they actually worked for a House committee and were drafting legislation.
  Footnotes: None
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FD05:

Teaching Radiation Literacy and Nature of Science via Inquiry
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Andy Johnson, Black Hills State University
605-645-3332, andy.johnson@bhsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Anna Hafele
  Abstract: Most Americans know very little about ionizing radiation, nuclear power, and nuclear waste. What they do know is based on movies, cartoons, and video games. Non-science majors wonder? Will radiation make them radioactive mutants? What about cell phones and microwaves? Is radiation chemicals or waves? To top it all off, many students know very little about atoms. We are developing innovative materials for teaching nonscientists about radiation using inquiry. This approach also teaches students new ways to reason scientifically. I will present some ways we have developed to help students clarify types of radiation and contamination by direct experimentation, understand causes and effects of radiation using innovative online atom simulators, and apply their new knowledge to make sense of radiation health effects and nuclear waste. Find the materials at http://www.camse.org/andy/radiation. The Radiation by Inquiry project is supported by NSF DUE 0942699
  Footnotes: None
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FD06:

Science in the News
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Matthew B. Koss, College of the Holy Cross
508-793-2406, mkoss@holycross.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Much of the vital scientific information that we need to know for our personal or civic utility or for its cultural value comes to us via the popular press. How do we negotiate and evaluate all that scientific information in order to know what is true, what is important, and what we are to do? In the course Science in the News, I have attempted to teach key elements of scientific-technical literacy with the methods and effectiveness of the media that provides scientific and technical information to the general public. In this talk I will present a précis on this course.
  Footnotes: None
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FD07:

Can We Deal with Societal Issues in an Introductory Course?
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Peter Lindenfeld, Rutgers University
609-921-9524, lindenf@physics.rutgers.edu
  Co-Author(s): Suzanne Brahmia
  Abstract: Yes, it is possible to include societal issues in an introductory course. It helps to have a textbook that includes them. Studies show that texts are rarely read, but perhaps this is not completely the fault of the students. A new book (1) attempts to deal with both questions. It includes chapters on Energy in Civilization and Laws and their Limits. It incorporates mathematics as part of the conversation, and includes a Guided Review that encourages reading. Perhaps surprisingly, although it includes material not usually in such books, it is less than half as massive as the standard texts.
  Footnotes: (1) Physics: The First Science, Peter Lindenfeld and Suzanne White Brahmia, Rutgers University Press 2011, www.first.rutgers.edu
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FD08:

Physics of Energy -- from Uganda to U.S.
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:50AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Abigail R. Mechtenberg, University of Michigan
734-975-0724, amechten@Umich.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We introduce an internationally developed and implemented curriculum that opens the eyes of physics education practitioners to the vast array of teaching and learning possibilities for the application of the physics of energy. This curriculum and research has been implemented in the U.S. and also in Uganda, East Africa, and Liberia West Africa (and now Guatemala). The academic level is suited for undergraduate physicists, engineers, and professional technicians; however, the astute teacher can easily apply this to other students as we have applied it to U.S. junior energy camps. From this innovative and institutionally transforming curriculum, the Ugandan participants built large-scale bicycle electric generators, merry-go-round generators, a back-up hand crank surgical lamp, hydroelectric generator, incinerator generator, and vertical wind turbines from local parts and materials. The U.S. participants have built classroom working devices such as a solar-powered car with i-pod player, steam engine, and many more devices. During our workshops multiple designs have been executed in groups. Participants leave with a clear understanding of the creativity they possess within themselves and realize the importance of (1) the knowledge of physics and (2) ease of designing these devices themselves. Mixing DIY (design it yourself) with the physics of energy has created an unexpected synergy.
  Footnotes: Physics and Society Committee
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FE:

Developing Teacher Leaders
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 9:30AM
  Presider: Jon Anderson,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FE01:

Evolving into a Teacher Leader
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - Kenneth E. Wester, Illinois State University
309-660-9902, kwester@ilstu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk will address various aspects of teacher leadership, including the roles of teacher leaders, the importance of teacher leaders, ways of preparing future teacher leaders and the evolution of the classroom teacher into that of a teacher leader. I will address the path I took in becoming a teacher leader and eventually a physics teacher educator at the university level.
  Footnotes: PhysTech
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FE02:

'OMG, You Want Me to Teach WHAT?'
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Karen J. Matsler, UTArlington/UTeach
817-733-2293, kmatsler@me.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: How does the professional community go about developing the local leaders to help reluctant recruits to teach physics effectively? The discussion will share experiences and data relevant to the effectiveness of professional development focusing on what we need, what we have, what we know, and what works.
  Footnotes: None
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FE03:

Reflections of a PhysTEC Physics Teacher in Residence
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Rod A. Ziolkowski, California State University--Long Beach
562-673-9200, rodziolkow@aol.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Identifying, encouraging, and mentoring prospective/beginning high school physics teachers is my primary role as PhysTEC physics teacher in residence at California State University-Long Beach. I will describe the leadership role I play when interacting with the physics department faculty, developing curriculum and programs, and interacting with beginning physics teachers. After 25 years teaching high school students, I see my physics-teacher-in-residence position as equal parts responsibility and opportunity and I look forward to sharing my experiences with you.
  Footnotes: None
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FE04:

Inquiry and the Use of Technology in Teaching Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Mark LaPorte, Middle Tennessee State University
615 494 8843, mlaporte@mtsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Effective implementation of technology within the context of inquiry instruction has been known to enhance the meaningful learning of physics by both enhancing the conceptual understanding and the motivation of students. Students who are explicitly aware of the questions they are trying to answer are more intellectually engaged in the design of the procedures to answer those questions. Mentoring pre-service teachers in the effective use of technology within the context of inquiry instruction is an important function of the TiR's role in preparing high-quality physics teachers. Examples of current technologies used in physics classrooms and how these technologies can be effectively used in inquiry-based curriculums are discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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FE05:

Feeling Connected
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: James L. Overhiser, Cornell University
6074237429, joverhis@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: A sense of feeling connected is part of being human. This is especially true for a young teacher. Involving pre-service and freshman teachers in content-specific networks early in their career helps them understand the connections that can be made to support their work in the classroom. This can also remove the anonymity that teachers work under and place them in a cooperative group of professional development. Doing this early in the career of a teacher will help them see the importance of such networking and teach them the responsibility of moving into leadership roles to keep the network active and viable.
  Footnotes: PhysTEC/APS
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FF:

Introductory Courses
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: John Griffith,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FF01:

The Law of Refraction without Trigonometry: Beaten to it by Descartes!
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:10AM
  Author: David Schuster, Western Michigan University
269 387-5844, david.schuster@wmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Betty Adams, Adriana Undreiu
  Abstract: Investigating and discovering a law for refraction is potentially an ideal activity for inquiry-based physics. However, the law of refraction involves sine functions; this complicates an empirical search for a law (as it did historically) and may also seem to preclude it for students with no trigonometry. Wanting a guided-discovery approach nonetheless, we "invented" a geometrical representation: incident and refracted ray directions can be specified not only by angle but by semi-chords in a reference circle. This proves very successful: students discover that various possible relationships, such as angle ratios, are initially promising but do not work at large angles; and they finally arrive at a simple and visually elegant law: the ratio of semi-chords for incident and refracted rays is constant. We then found that we had been beaten to this form of the law by nearly 400 years, by Descartes among others! Thus in the case of refraction, exemplary inquiry pedagogy has a counterpart in history. Note that the approach also reveals the underlying meaning of sine functions and a reason why trigonometry was invented. Students then go on to use the semi-chord representation to solve refraction problems by geometrical construction.
  Footnotes: None
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FF02:

Discovering the Law of Refraction
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:10AM - 8:20AM
  Author: Adriana Undreiu, University of Virginia's College at Wise
(276) 328-0203, au8e@uvawise.edu
  Co-Author(s): Betty Adams, David Schuster
  Abstract: Refraction can serve as a wonderful example of a guided-discovery approach to a physics topic. Yet many textbook treatments remain the antithesis of this, despite the fact that physics is more than just a body of knowledge. Our inquiry-based approach involves exploring refraction behavior and tracing rays, then testing for possible relationships between incident and refracted ray directions, seeking a law that works at all angles. (A semi-chord representation for ray directions makes the task easier and less abstract). If a course has no lab, students still use graphic ray-direction data to seek a law, as a valuable inductive discovery problem. Note that conventional problems are purely deductive, missing an important facet of real science. We will contrast the approach, both epistemologically and pedagogically, with direct didactic presentations common in textbooks. Refraction has proved to be one of the most successful inquiry-based topics in our course for prospective teachers, for learning both the physics and the nature of scientific inquiry.
  Footnotes: Will be presented by Betty Adams.
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FF03:

Characterizing Iconic Problems of the Introductory Physics Course
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:20AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Juan R. Burciaga
Dept of Physics & Astronomy Denison University
740 587-5665, burciagaj@denison.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The introductory physics course has a backbone of problems that form the basis of future study, that is problems that physics students see again and again throughout their study of physics, each time approaching a given problem in greater depth and complexity. Characteristics of these iconic problems may offer insight into some of the "habits of mind" employed by physicists as they approach problem solving in the discipline and perhaps shed some light on the intractable nature of the curriculum. The paper reports on a census of the iconic problems from the introductory sequence and identifying the characteristics that make these problems valuable to the physics discipline and the physics curriculum.
  Footnotes: None
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FF04:

Measurements of Students' Performance on Computational Exercises in Introductory Mechanics
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Marcos D. Caballero, Georgia Institute of Technology
770-827-3185, caballero@gatech.edu
  Co-Author(s): Matthew A. Kohlmyer, Michael F Schatz
  Abstract: The impact of laboratory and homework exercises on the development of computational thinking is evaluated using a proctored end-of-course computational exercise. We present the motivation for and development of this proctored assignment, an analysis of erroneous student code, and the implications for teaching computation to introductory physics students.
  Footnotes: None
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FF06:

The Answer Is in the Back of the Book
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Stephanie A. Magleby, Brigham Young University
8014228319, sam25@physics.byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: One plus one is three; because three is the answer in the back of the book. Sound familiar? We have seen increased instances of this kind of "wishful math" in our undergraduate physics and engineering courses. In this talk I will discuss the pedagogical pros and cons of having the answer readily available in the back of the book. Also, we discuss different teaching and grading techniques to counteract this "creative math" trend.
  Footnotes: None
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FF07:

Reforming Undergraduate Course for Engineering/Physics Majors: Factors Influencing Students' Performance
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Deepika Menon, University of Missouri
573-529-4707, dm2qc@mail.mizzou.edu
  Co-Author(s): Karen King
  Abstract: There has been emphasis on reforming traditional undergraduate physics courses for science/engineering majors. This study was conducted with 273 undergraduate students, enrolled in calculus-based course for physics majors at a large Midwestern University. The focus was to understand the factors that influence students' performance within the course. The course has weekly 2½ hours of lecture, 2½ hours of laboratory, and a small group recitation section focusing on problem solving. Students are assigned weekly online homework and pop-up quizzes (counts towards attendance). Regression analysis shows that students' average exam score is neither influenced by gender nor their major (engineering/physics/other sciences). However, students' average exam score is highly significant with their lab score, pop quizzes, and online assignments. Findings of the study would help science faculty design courses for science/engineering majors with emphasis on factors that strongly contribute towards their average grade. Reform-based courses would further help reduce drop outs, providing "preparatory classes" for students at risk.
  Footnotes: None
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FF08:

Computer Simulation vs. Demonstration in the Introductory Physics Lecture
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Monica Pierri-Galvao, Marywood University
570-348-6211, mpierrigalvao@marywood.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Students today belong to a computer generation. They grew up playing video games and using computers for all their learning and entertainment needs. In view of this new student profile, it is worth asking the question if learning can be enhanced by replacing traditional demos with computer simulations in the lecture setting. To investigate this issue, we replaced four demonstrations with simulations in an introductory physics course and compared the learning outcomes with a pre- and post-test.
  Footnotes: None
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FF09:

Student Difficulties Using Graphs Required for a Materials Science Course
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Rebecca J. Rosenblatt, The Ohio State University
614-460-9502, rosenblatt.rebecca@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Andrew Heckler
  Abstract: We report on a number of student difficulties with standard graphs and diagrams used in an university-level introductory materials science and engineering course. We investigated student understanding of a variety of graphs and diagrams including atomic bonding potential energy graphs, material concentration and diffusion graphs, stress-stain plots, and phase diagrams. Some of the difficulties with graphs are similar to those previously found in studies of introductory physics topics, such as students confounding slope with height and the failure to attend to the axis labels. However, we have identified a number of other difficulties specific to the type of graph or diagram used. For example, many students have difficulties both using the boundaries of an alloy phase diagram to derive information about the microstructure of the alloy and understanding the physical meaning of the boundaries between phases. We also report on the effectiveness of some graph activities implemented in recitation.
  Footnotes: None
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FF10:

Tracking Student Focus During Lectures
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: David Rosengrant, Kennesaw State University
678 797 2482, drosengr@kennesaw.edu
  Co-Author(s): Doug Hearrington
  Abstract: This study investigates the gaze patterns of undergraduate college students attending a lecture-based physics class to better understand the relationships between gaze and focus patterns and student attention during class. The investigators used a new eye-tracking product, Tobii Glasses with infrared markers, which eliminate the need for subjects to focus on a computer screen or carry around a backpack-sized recording device, thus enabling a broader range of research questions to be investigated. This investigation includes when, for how long, and what students focus on in the classroom (i.e. demonstrations, instructor, notes, board work, and presentations) during a normal lecture. After the lectures, most subjects attended an interview at which they were shown part of their video of their gaze patterns and were asked to reflect on their thinking and attention. We report on the subjects as a whole and then in subgroups based upon grades and specific courses.
  Footnotes: None
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FF11:

Fostering Computational Thinking: Computer Modeling Homework in Introductory Mechanics
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Michael F. Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology
(678) 500-9133, michael.schatz@physics.gatech.edu
  Co-Author(s): Marcos D. Caballero, John B Burk, Matthew A Kohlmyer
  Abstract: Introductory physics courses typically fail to provide students with significant opportunities to use a computer to solve science and engineering problems. We present an overview of recent work to develop laboratory and homework exercises on numerical modeling, simulation, and visualization for students in introductory mechanics in both high school and large enrollment university courses.
  Footnotes: None
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FF12:

The Educational Pitfalls of 'Plug-In' Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:50AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Hiro Shimoyama, The University of Southern Mississippi
601-307-7255, hironori.shimoyama@usm.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In the field of physics teaching and learning, university students' performance on exams sometimes does not effectively indicate their understanding. Namely, due to ill-conceived approaches to academic tasks, some students can obtain a higher score without actually learning scientific concepts. One typical approach is so called "plug-in" physics, by which students focus on only the values and related formulas. From an instructor's point of view, it is often difficult to identify this problem. Although this method may enable students to obtain "correct" answers, such students do not necessarily acquire the basic principles of physics and they cannot deal with certain types of problems in authentic "real world" contexts. This talk depicts some real examples of "plug-in" physics and explores possible solutions to this widespread problem, including the requirement of partial and sequential answers and use of visual stimuli-based problems in the design of assessments.
  Footnotes: None
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FG:

New Avenues for Collaboration and Mentoring
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Dr. Todd Leif,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FH:

Assessment Beyond Conceptual Inventories
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Aaron Titus,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FH01:

Why Conceptual Inventories Are Insufficient Assessment of Our Instructional Methods
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Invited - Beth Thacker, Texas Tech University
806-742-2996, beth.thacker@ttu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We present data on written pre- and post-testing and conceptual inventory pre- and post-testing in introductory labs as part of a large-scale assessment project. We address the benefits and drawbacks of each kind of assessment and discuss the need for a more comprehensive assessment to evaluate our instructional methods.
  Footnotes: This project is partially supported by grants NIH 5RC1GM090897-02 and NSF 0737181.
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FH02:

Sustaining and Improving through Programmatic Assessment and Feedback Loops
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Invited - Vincent H. Kuo, Colorado School of Mines
303-273-3764, hkuo@mines.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: As the fifth largest undergraduate physics program in the country, the ABET-accredited Engineering Physics degree at the Colorado School of Mines currently has 240 majors, representing substantial growth over the past decade. A shift in program philosophy contributed to our current status. But are we successful? To better understand how we got here, and how best to proceed into the future, we turn to both horizontal and vertical assessments at the programmatic level. As is well known in the engineering education community, accredited programs must implement a process for developing program goals and objectives, along with a delivery plan that makes use of assessment and feedback to demonstrate continuous improvement. In this talk I will provide an overview of our undergraduate degree program, highlight some of the changes we have made, and describe our three overlapping assessment/feedback loops at the scale of individual courses, program learning objectives, and overall program goals.
  Footnotes: None
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FH03:

What Stops a Person from Successfully Solving a Physics Problem?
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Invited - Wendy K. Adams, University of Northern Colorado
970-539-6154, wendy.adams@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Physics educators regularly make use of concept inventories and perceptions surveys (aka: attitudes and beliefs) to evaluate instruction. However, these two types of evaluation only touch on a fraction of what is learned in a course. Students apply a range of processes, expectations and bits of knowledge when solving a physics problem and some of these are impacted by the course. The question is how can we identify what these processes, expectations and bits of knowledge are, how can we teach them and then how can we measure them? While developing the CAPS (Colorado Assessment of Problem Solving), I identified 44 processes, expectations and bits of knowledge used to solve an in depth real world problem. In this presentation I will present these skills, ideas on how to teach them and measure them.
  Footnotes: None
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FH04:

Formative Assessment of Hypothetico-deductive Reasoning by Directly Challenging Student Epistemology
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: James C. Moore, Coastal Carolina University
843-349-2985, moorejc@coastal.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: A critical skill necessary for practicing scientists is the application of the hypothetico-deductive model and the use of all available epistemological resources to determine new truths. Hypothetico-deductive reasoning can be assessed via written tests; however, these types of assessments avoid situations where students have deeply held pre-conceived knowledge. We present a case study where first-year physics majors are confronted with epistemic complexity; their pre-conceived "knowledge" is directly challenged, forcing them to apply different epistemological resources towards the design of an appropriate experiment. Students struggle with developing hypothetico-deductive models that probe strongly held beliefs, whereas they do not for unknown or weakly held assumptions. For strong beliefs, students limit themselves to certain modes of knowledge construction, specifically those that led to the beliefs in the first place. These challenges can be used to probe the depth of student reasoning, and explicit confrontation of this dichotomy can make students stronger truth seekers.
  Footnotes: None
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FH05:

Measuring Conceptual Understanding in Kinematics by Problem-Solving
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Daniel M. Smith, Jr., South Carolina State University
803-536-7162, dsmith@scsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: To solve kinematics problems, students are usually advised to (1) draw a diagram or graph, (2) write down known and unknown quantities, (3) choose kinematic equations that will allow the determination of the unknown quantities, and (4) solve that equation. Frequently this prescription does not result in the student finding a problem solution, but why? Often student difficulties are attributed to their inability to choose the correct equation, or to weak skills in algebra. Evidence is presented from a calculus-based physics class, however, that students fail to solve problems because they lack a conceptual understanding of the problem, as determined by their ability to relate the problem data to a diagram. The limited roles that "choosing the right equation," and weak algebra skills play in problem-solving is further explored by having students solve problems graphically by using interactive software designed especially for one-dimensional kinematics problems.
  Footnotes: None
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FH06:

Phased-Array Homework: Used to Shape and Steer Student Understanding
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:50AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Stacy H. Godshall,
845-938-4233, stacy.godshall@us.army.mil
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Students demonstrate different levels of preparation and understanding of material which often coincide with how diligent the students are with their daily preparation prior to class. Having them attempt homework problems prior to class enables them to be better prepared to ask specific questions about concepts and also better prepared to perform on exams. This paper will introduce "phased-array homework" which is a flexible system of assigning homework that also incorporates specific timing of publication to students of "partial solutions" for reference by the students. As the name of the homework system implies, phased-array homework allows an instructor to shape and steer student understanding in much the same way that a phased-array antenna allows for the shaping and steering of a transmitted electromagnetic signal to yield its subsequent effective radiation pattern. Implementation method and results will be presented as well as student perspective on the system.
  Footnotes: None
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FI:

Teacher Recruitment, Training and Enhancement
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 9:30AM
  Presider: Duane Merrell,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FI01:

Expectancy Violation in a Physics Course for Education Majors
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:10AM
  Author: Jon D. H. Gaffney, University of Kentucky
(724)601-5936, jon.gaffney@uky.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: At the University of Kentucky, an interactive, hands-on physics course is required of pre-service elementary and middle school teachers. This pedagogically reformed course is substantially different from their other science courses and could be a touchstone for science education methods classes. In a previous presentation (AAPT Jacksonville 2011), I relayed the differences in goals for students and instructors, claiming that students reported the most success meeting the goals they valued highest. Deeper investigation revealed satisfaction with many aspects of the course but confusion about its role in the teacher preparation process. In this presentation, I will discuss the role that student expectations and expectancy violations play in their perceptions of the course, which may in turn affect whether they deem it relevant to their future careers. I will present additions to the course that I have introduced to facilitate necessary shifts in student expectations.
  Footnotes: None
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FI02:

Using the RTOP to Gauge Implementation of IPTIR Program Goals
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:10AM - 8:20AM
  Author: Jeremy B. Hulshizer, University of Northern Iowa
319-273-2420, jeremy.hulshizer@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Lawrence T. Escalada, Jeffrey T Morgan
  Abstract: The Iowa Physics Teacher Instruction and Resources (IPTIR) program at the University of Northern Iowa trains physics teachers in research-based inquiry strategies; many out-of-field teachers also use the program to gain certification to teach physics. As part of their program activities, participants submit two video lessons each academic year, which the staff use to evaluate the degree to which participants are employing methods emphasized by the program. The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (1) is used to rate each submission. We discuss trends observed in examining the RTOP scores of program participants, as well as correlations between RTOP scores and student performance on various standardized conceptual assessments and other measures. 1. 1. Sawada, Daiwo, et al. "Measuring Reform Practices in Science and Mathematics Classrooms: The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol," School Science and Mathematics 102(6), pp. 245-253.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Lawrence Escalada and Jeffrey Morgan.
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FI03:

Content, Process, Affect, and Physics Courses for Future Teachers
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:20AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Paul Hutchison, Grinnell College
(641) 269-4882, hutchiso@grinnell.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: A physics class must have some physics knowledge in it. This self-evident statement hides complexity worth examining. It is important to think about the role of physics knowledge and the role of students in relation to it. This study explores how different knowledge-student relationships interact with the multiple goals in physics courses aimed at pre-service elementary teachers, though the findings bear on any course for future teachers. I draw on analyses of existing curricula, scholarship from the science education and teacher education research communities, and data collected when I taught such courses. My study indicates different relationships between students and physics knowledge can create classroom environments that prize some goals over others. It's not clear this must necessarily be a zero-sum game, where the most important goal is identified and supported. I speculate how a physics course for teachers might be organized to simultaneously support multiple instructional goals.
  Footnotes: None
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FI04:

Training of In-service Science Teachers Using Peer Instruction (PI)
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Jongwon Kim, Korea National University Of Education
+821054688836, bellbesty@hotmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Jungbok Kim
  Abstract: Using peer instruction in introductory physics courses is growing at institutions across the U.S., however, this approach is rarely used for training in-service science teachers. We have been incorporating peer instruction for training in-service science teachers since 2010. This has been aimed to 169 teachers in five classes (two elementary schools, two middle schools and one combined). We surveyed 135 teachers from these classes to research their perspectives and recommendations for using peer instruction, and investigated 56 of them with six conceptests for light propagation. We found that 93% of the teachers acknowledged the value of peer instruction to develop their concept of science. Through analysis of teachers' answers to these questions, we identified that the percentage of correct answers increases significantly after peer instruction. Finally, we found broad agreement of about 91% for using peer instruction for training in-service science teachers.
  Footnotes: None
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FI05:

PTRA ToPPS Project at NWOSU
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: Steven J. Maier, Northwestern Oklahoma State University
580 327 8562, sjmaier@nwosu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In the summer of 2011, a PTRA ToPPS science institute for Oklahoma middle and high school teachers was hosted at Northwestern Oklahoma State University [1]. This institute is the first of its kind for the state of Oklahoma and will be a major step forward for establishing a network of resources and cooperating teachers across northwest Oklahoma. In this presentation, an update of a continuing four-year study that served as the motivation for pursuing an ITQ grant [3] will be presented. How the program is expected to address the needs of "out of field" teachers and the call for additional professional development for physical science teachers across the state will also be discussed. Finally, preliminary results of the institute's effectiveness in building upon participants' content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, instructional strategies, professional networking and recourses to help their districts and students in their classrooms will be shared.
  Footnotes: PTRA (Physics Teaching Resource Agents) ToPPS (Teachers of Physics and Physical Science) [1] Program website: www.nwosu.edu/ToPPS [2] Maier, S.J., HS Physics Teaching in Oklahoma: A Status Report, AAPT summer conference, Portland, OR, 2010. [3] Funding for this project was made possible by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Improving Teacher Quality grant program for professional development; NCLB Title II, Part A.
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FI06:

Promoting Changes to Teachers' Classroom Practices
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Jeff Phillips, Loyola Marymount University
310-338-7811, jphillips@lmu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: One hundred eighteen high school and college teachers in Southern California completed a web-based survey that asked them to self-report what they do in the classroom and answer questions that might shed light on who is adopting various research-based instructional strategies (RBIS). The use of RBIS and a fraction of the course devoted to student-student interaction often correlated with the teachers' view of intelligence (incremental versus entity) and the degree to which they self-regulate their teaching. It was also observed that the teachers' classroom practices do not correlate with many one-way interactions, including attending conference presentations or reading journals. Implications for those looking to promote change in teachers, including AAPT Sections, will be discussed.
  Footnotes: None
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FI07:

Teacher-Driven Professional Development and the Pursuit of a Sophisticated Understanding of Inquiry
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Michael J. Ross, University of Colorado - Boulder
3037097105, michael.j.ross@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Samson J. Sherman, Ben J VanDusen, Valerie K Otero
  Abstract: The need for quality physics teaching in the U.S. is well established, and efforts are under way to develop innovative teacher professional development experiences to improve physics education. The physics education research reported here investigates how an innovative program has facilitated growth in physical science teachers' views of scientific inquiry. Streamline to Mastery is an NSF-funded teacher-as-learner-centered professional development program that capitalizes on teachers' knowledge and experience as they move toward mastery in their fields. Teacher participants explicitly chose to focus on their understandings of "inquiry" through the development and implementation of inquiry-oriented curricula. Preliminary findings indicate that teachers' conceptions of inquiry and the relationship of physics classroom inquiry to scientific inquiry have changed significantly as they continue to engage in a variety of experiences around the topic. These results will be discussed along with implications for physics instruction and physics teacher professional development.
  Footnotes: This research is partially funded by NSF grant #DUE 934921 and sponsored by Valerie Otero, University of Colorado, Boulder.
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FI08:

Scientific Reasoning Abilities in Pre-service Teachers in the Capstone Science Course 
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Eric N. Rowley, Wright State University
859 462 4747, fizx_teacher@mac.com
  Co-Author(s): Kathy Koenig
  Abstract: Prior assessment of our pre-service teachers' understanding of the nature of science (NOS) and scientific reasoning (SR) abilities were found lacking for candidates exiting our program after having completed as many as 11 science content courses. For three years we have implemented a new course to start the science sequence and collaborated to enhance our existing courses. Evaluation of the curriculum indicated that students made significant shifts in understanding and abilities as a result of this one-quarter course. In spring 2011, another year of students were post-tested to determine the longitudinal impact of the revised foundations course. This talk will provide a brief overview of the course along with the findings of this longitudinal study, as well as a discussion of implications of the transitions to semesters in fall 2012.
  Footnotes: None
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FI09:

Changing Roles and Identities in a Teacher-Driven Professional Development Community
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Ben Van Dusen, CU Boulder
(541) 729-6446, benjamin.vandusen@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): Mike Ross, Sam Sherman, Valerie Otero
  Abstract: In a climate where teachers feel de-professionalized at the hands of regulations, testing, and politics, it is vital that teachers become empowered both in their own teaching and as agents of change. This physics education research study investigates the "Streamline to Mastery" (S2M) professional development program, in which teachers engage in action research while designing future professional development opportunities for themselves and for fellow teachers. The research reported here describes the process of empowerment through changes in roles and identities over time. Videotaped data were analyzed to glean insight in language, practice, and participation shifts as secondary physical science teachers participated and formed the S2M community and engaged in their own classroom research. Implications for the role of PER in teacher professional development and teacher preparation will be discussed. This research is partially funded by the NSF DUE grant #934921.
  Footnotes: None
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GA:

Post Deadline I
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:10PM
  Presider: Jeannette Lawler,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GA01:

A simple calibrations lab.
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:10PM
  Author: Dan Beeker, Indiana University
(812) 855-5903, debeeker@indiana.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: A simple laboratory exercise to determine the accuracy of a meter stick and ultrasonic motion detector using homemade calibration bars is described. This lab exercise makes an ideal first lab as it is simple to do yet provides a reliable value for the accuracy of measuring devices commonly used in the first year physics labs.
  Footnotes: None
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GA02:

Arduino as a tool for lab development and student learning
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:10PM - 1:20PM
  Author: Zengqiang Liu, Saint Cloud State University
320-308-3154, zliu@stcloudstate.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jing Chen, ShunJie Yong, Steve Zinsli
  Abstract: Since its debuted in 2005, the Arduino microcontroller platform has enabled artists and novice electronics hobbyists worldwide to construct unique electronic gadgets, lots of which appear as if they were created by engineers. With Arduino, constructing your own lab equipment becomes very practical, and economical. It is also very educational to students and instructors alike. With beginner-friendly programming environment, strong community support, and sensors, cheaply mass produced for modern electronics (cell phones, tablets, video game systems etc.), we can design and construct high-quality lab equipment to suit out teaching goals and improve student learning experience. Going through the process of constructing even simple equipment should be beneficial to teaching physics content, hands-on skills and convincing our students that physics principles and their applications power our world. A brief introduction of Arduino will be followed by examples of such equipment we created with it.
  Footnotes: None
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GA03:

Successful Strategies for Teaching Physics II (Electromagnetism, Optics, Modern Physics)
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:20PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Deepthi Amarasuriya, Northwest College
(307)754-6454, deepthi.amarasuriya@northwestcollege.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Teaching calculus based Physics II (EM, optics, introduction to modern physics) in one semester is difficult - especially when classes meet for three 50 minute lecture sessions, and one 2.5 hr lab per week. Having many mathematically underprepared students adds to the challenge. By judiciously combining "old fashioned" blackboard lectures with concise but comprehensive printed lecture notes, Power Point slides, Java applets and labs that work in tandem with lectures, I have covered the designated topics well enough so that over 75% of my students continue with Engineering and Physics programs.
  Footnotes: None
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GA04:

Should students be provided diagrams or asked to draw them while solving introductory physics problems?
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:30PM - 1:40PM
  Author: Alexandru Maries, University of Pittsburgh
201-312-5091, alm195@pitt.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Drawing appropriate diagrams is a useful problem solving heuristic that can transform the problem into a representation that is easier to exploit for solving the problem. A major focus while helping introductory physics students learn problem solving is to help them appreciate that drawing diagrams facilitates further problem solution. We conducted an investigation in which approximately 120 students in an algebra-based introductory physics course were subjected to three different interventions during the problem solving in recitation quizzes throughout the semester. They were either asked to solve problems in which the diagrams were drawn for them or they were explicitly told to draw a diagram or they were not given any instruction regarding diagrams. We developed a rubric to score problem solving performance of students in different intervention groups. We will present our findings including some surprising results for problems which involve final/initial situations. This work is supported by NSF.
  Footnotes: None
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GA05:

Does Reading Physics Textbooks Help Resolve the Contradictions?
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:40PM - 1:50PM
  Author: Sevda Yerdelen-Damar
University Of Maryland - College Park
2022303062, syerdelen@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Students' intuitive knowledge about physical phenomena influences their learning. However, inappropriately activated intuitive knowledge leads to contradictions with formal physics knowledge. This study explored whether students become aware of those contradictions when reading textbooks. Firstly, 36 tenth grade students responded to a questionnaire designed to activate their intuitive knowledge about the relation between force and velocity. Specifically, students were asked to compare, intuitively, the magnitude of the push force and friction force exerted on a cup moving at steady speed. 29 students answered the push force should be greater than the frictional force. Secondly, the students read textbook pages explaining explicitly that the net force exerted on an object moving at constant velocity must be zero. Finally, they answered whether they felt any inconsistency between their intuitive knowledge and what they read. Only five students reported they felt contradiction. This result indicates that simply reading the textbook does not guarantee that they will realize the inconsistencies between everyday thinking and formal physics knowledge.
  Footnotes: None
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GA07:

Will the fox catch the rabbit? Non-Cartesean Thinking in Introductory Mechanics.
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:10PM
  Author: Mikhail Kagan, Penn State University
814-777-4472, mak411@psu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: As we typically teach in an introductory mechanics course, choosing a 'good' reference frame with convenient axes may present a major simplification to a problem. Additionally, knowing some conserved quantities provides an extremely powerful problem-solving tool. While the former idea is typically discussed in the context of Newton's Laws, the latter starts with introducing conservation of energy even later. This work presents an elegant example of implementing both aforementioned ideas in the kinematical context, thus providing a 'warm-up' introduction to the standard tools used later on in dynamics. Both the choice of the (non-orthogonal) reference frame and the conserved quantities are rather non-standard, yet at the same time quite intuitive to the problem at hand. Two such problems are discussed in detail with two alternative approaches. The first approach does not even require knowledge of calculus. In the appendix, I also present the brute-force solution involving a coupled system of differential equations. In addition, a few exercises and another similar problem for students' homework are provided.
  Footnotes: None
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GB:

High Performance Computing
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:00PM
  Presider: David Joiner,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GB01:

High-performance Computing with Undergraduates: From Classrooms to Conferences
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Michael W. Roth, University of Northern Iowa
319-273-7336, rothm@uni.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: In the last 20 years, computational physics has become a separate branch of study, right along with theoretical and experimental physics. As our computing resources have advanced, we now rely on massively parallel high-performance computing techniques to simulate and model physical systems. There are many interesting research topics in physics spanning a wide range of length and time scales that are accessible to undergraduate students through direct extension of concepts learned in their sequence of courses. Several such research problems will be discussed in context of their importance and effectiveness in equipping physics undergraduates for success in research environments and promoting interdepartmental collaboration.
  Footnotes: None
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GB02:

Research with Undergrads in Computational Molecular Biophysics: Successes and Challenges
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Patricia Soto, Creighton University
4029807310, PatriciaSoto@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): Trang Doan
  Abstract: The computational molecular biophysics group at Creighton University aims at deciphering the biophysics of pathological folding processes of proteins and peptides, a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases. To this end, high-performance computer (HPC) simulations are implemented in which the motion of individual protein and solvent atoms is mimicked by using techniques from classical statistical mechanics. The multidisciplinary nature of the research appeals to college students from diverse academic backgrounds, each student working on a project tailored to their interests and skills. Students are thus engaged for the very first time and have the opportunity to contribute to a project that utilizes scientific computing to tackle cutting-edge science questions. Remarkably, students build upon their computer literacy and develop enthusiasm in further exploring the HPC technology. A likely explanation of such attitudes is that students are challenged to interact actively with HPC resources and applications. The role as users the students develop empowers them and brings a whole new perspective on the potential use of computing in science, technology, and medicine.
  Footnotes: None
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GC:

Laboratories for Astronomy
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:20PM
  Presider: Mary Ann Hickman Klassen,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GC01:

Engineering Innovative Curricula for Inquiry in an Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratory
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Daniel J. Lyons, University of Wyoming
262-496-5519, danjlyons@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The literature argues that students do not develop deep understandings of the structure or nature of the scientific discipline of inquiry unless the underlying ideas are taught explicitly. In response the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research CAPER Team has developed an introductory astronomy lab curriculum with a backwards faded-scaffolding approach to support student engagement in authentic inquiry experiences. Backwards faded-scaffolding is a strategy where the conventional and rigidly linear "scientific method" is turned on its head and students are first taught how to create conclusions based on evidence, then how experimental design creates evidence, and only at the end introduces students to -- what we believe is the most challenging part of inquiry -- inventing scientifically appropriate questions. To assess the curriculum we are using the Views of Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) survey and the Test of Astronomy Standards (TOAST).
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Timothy F. Slater, Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research CAPER Team, www.CAPERTeam.com
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GC02:

Results from a Study of Inquiry in Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Kendra Sibbernsen, Metropolitan Community College
402-738-4752, kjsibbernsen@mccneb.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk will focus on the results from a mixed-method quasi-experimental study that was designed to determine if students in an undergraduate astronomy laboratory increase their understanding of inquiry. A backward-faded scaffold (BFS) format was used for the laboratory exercises. The measure of increase in inquiry was determined by the examining pre-tests and post-tests of the Views of Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) survey, scores on laboratory exercises at the beginning and end of the course, and observations from the instructor. Information will be given outlining how these results are being used to guide recommendations for practice and for further research, including online implementation of the astronomy laboratory exercises and development of a physical science survey laboratory class using the BFS format.
  Footnotes: None
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GC03:

Balloon Data and Planetary Temperature Profiles
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:10PM
  Author: Gordon C. McIntosh, University of Minnesota, Morris
(320) 589-6342, mcintogc@morris.umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Atmospheric temperature measurements during a balloon flight provide a basis for the comparison of temperatures and the variation of temperatures with altitude in the atmospheres of solar system bodies. The altitudes and temperatures are measured and transmitted to Earth thorough the StratoSAT system. Data from a launch on the morning of Saturday, 6 November 2010, will be presented and compared to temperature profiles from Mars, Venus, and Titan. The data indicate the effects of the Earth's surface, the lapse rate in the troposphere, the altitude of the tropopause, and the increasing temperature of the stratosphere. These data and comparisons form the basis for an astronomy, meteorology, or Earth science laboratory activity.
  Footnotes: None
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GC04:

Measuring the Temperature of a Star from Its Continuous Spectrum
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:10PM - 2:20PM
  Author: John E. Shaw, Northwest Missouri State University
660-562-1636, jshaw@nwmissouri.edu
  Co-Author(s): David Richardson
  Abstract: One way to measure the surface temperature of a star is to measure the ratio of intensities of light through a blue filter compared to a green filter. Assuming the star behaves as an ideal blackbody, Planck's formula can be used to calculate the temperature at the surface of the star. A similar activity can be done in the laboratory by measuring the intensities of light from an incandescent light bulb through infrared, red, green, and blue filters. The students can use the ratio of two of these as a way of determining the temperature of the tungsten filament of the light bulb. A spreadsheet is used to illustrate the predictions of the spectra of a blackbody at different temperatures from Planck's formula.
  Footnotes: None
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GD:

PER in the High School
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Presider: Daniel  Crowe,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GD01:

Effects of Physics and Everyday Thinking in an Urban High School
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:10PM
  Author: Shelly N. Belleau, University of Colorado
9702317567, shelly.belleau@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Michael J. Ross
  Abstract: The Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET) curriculum is based on educational research and consists of carefully sequenced sets of activities intended to help students develop physics ideas through guided experimentation and questioning with extensive small group and whole class discussion. A high school physics teacher has adapted and implemented the PET curriculum in two urban high schools with the aim of removing barriers that typically limit student access to, and identification with, physics. Though PET was not designed for secondary physics students, this teacher has worked closely with physics education research faculty and graduate students to simultaneously implement and investigate the impact of PET on students' physics learning. Preliminary results indicate that an adapted version of PET has great potential to provide greater opportunities for access and success in understanding physics as well as the nature of science.
  Footnotes: This research is partially funded by NSF grant #DUE 934921 and sponsored by Valerie Otero, University of Colorado, Boulder
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GD02:

Impact of the Learning Assistant Experience for High School Physics Students
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:10PM - 1:20PM
  Author: Susan M. Nicholson-Dykstra, Northglenn High School
7209724600, susan.m.nicholsondykstra@adams12.org
  Co-Author(s): Joshua H. Cuchiaro, Valerie K Otero
  Abstract: An ongoing partnership was formed between the conceptual physics classes at an urban high school and the second-grade classes at an elementary school in the same district. During the latter half of the course, students in the high school classes learned how to create backward design lesson plans and utilize formative assessments to measure student understanding. The physics students then created lesson plans pertaining to four units of study (Newton's Laws, conservation of energy, electrostatics, and circuits), which they implemented in their partner elementary classroom. Participating physics classes were comparatively evaluated for effects on content understanding and retention, engagement, motivation, and perception of learning. Data from four classes will be presented with recommendations for continuing the elementary-secondary physics partnership. Project was partially funded by NSF grant #DUE 934921 and ING Financial Service's Unsung Hero Award.
  Footnotes: None
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GD03:

Assessment Preparation: Impacts of Explicit Reflection Prompts on Learning
  Location: HC 3023 & 3023A
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:20PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Emily J. Quinty
Mapleton Expeditionary School of the Arts (MESA) and University of Colorado, Boulder
720-309-2683, emily.quinty@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Valerie K. Otero
  Abstract: This research study addresses urban high school students' struggles with preparing for assessments. In this study, students completed a questionnaire immediately following all quizzes and tests reflecting on several aspects of test preparation: how well they thought they did and why, how they knew what to study, what specific activities helped them prepare for the assessment, and what they will do differently to prepare for the next assessment. Responses were analyzed for patterns in student language and metacognitive statements, examining trends in both individual students and classes over time. Responses were also correlated to assessment data and changes in instructional strategies. Results from this study provide insight into what students do to prepare for a quiz or test, and also reveal trends in how students interpret the purpose of reflective activities.
  Footnotes: This research is partially funded by NSF grant #DUE 934921 and sponsored by Valerie Otero, University of Colorado, Boulder.
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GE:

Major Consequences of Minor Dishonesty in Physics Classes
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 3:00PM
  Presider: Mary Lowe,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GE01:

Making Homework Easier to Do Than to Copy
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Gerd Kortemeyer, Michigan State University
517-282-6446, korte@lite.msu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Using the example of LON-CAPA (http://www.lon-capa.org/), this talk presents mechanisms and examples for randomizing introductory physics questions beyond merely inserting random numbers and shifting around answer options. Strategies on how to randomly generate scenarios with desired properties (including different graphs, images, formulas, setups, boundary conditions, data drawn from libraries, and the use of student input for later problem parts), as well as input mechanisms beyond numbers and multiple choice (e.g., formula input and graph input checked for properties rather than correspondence to a given answer), will be presented. Once scenarios and expected inputs are sufficiently different from student to student (while still dealing with the same physics), it becomes harder to reverse-engineer the problem than to deal with the physics -- collaborations between learners morph from cheating into peer-teaching.
  Footnotes: None
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GE02:

Consequences of Participation in Unmoderated Discussion Forums
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Wolfgang Bauer, Michigan State University
517-353-8662, bauer@pa.msu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: While sophisticated course management systems and homework engines like LON-CAPA can prevent simple student-to-student copying of answers and cheating a la Cramster, dedicated groups of students will still be able to reverse-engineer most homework problems. We analyze one such case and show that cheating on homework has a quantifiable negative impact on exam performance. We also present a new approach of correlating weekly homework with weekly exams. First indications are that this approach curtails cheating on homework, and that it leads to greater student satisfaction with the course and with the exam framework.
  Footnotes: Research supported by the US National Science Foundation.
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GE03:

Comparing an Academic Dishonesty Survey with Reality
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Invited - Young-Jin Lee, University of Kansas
785-864-0625, yjlee@ku.edu
  Co-Author(s): David J. Palazzo, David E. Pritchard
  Abstract: An anonymous survey containing questions frequently used in self-reported academic dishonesty studies plus more sharply worded questions was administered to a large introductory physics class at MIT. The actual copy rate, which was inferred from the log files of the Web-based learning environment students used, was found to be 43% higher than the self-reported copy fraction. Among several contextual and situational factors often examined in the previous academic dishonesty studies, gender, and major were found to be positively correlated with the observed copying of electronic homework problems. Also, student motivation for learning was found to be negatively correlated with self-reported copying. Students report 70% more copying of written homework than online homework, consistent with easier availability of answers for written homework. The survey and a few interviews suggest that time pressure on students who do not start their homework in a timely fashion is the proximate cause of copying.
  Footnotes: Dr. David E. Pritchard (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
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GE04:

Patterns, Consequences, and Reduction of Homework Copying
  Location: HC 3027
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:30PM - 3:00PM
  Author: Invited - David E. Pritchard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
617-253-6812, dpritch@mit.edu
  Co-Author(s): David J. Palazzo, Young-Jin Lee, Rasil Warnakulasooriya
  Abstract: Homework copying was detected in the online homework tutor MasteringPhysics.com. Copying increased as each weekly deadline approached, for problems later in each assignment, and dramatically over the semester. The majority of students copied less than 10% of their problems and worked steadily over the three days before the deadline, whereas repetitive copiers (>30% of problems) exerted little effort early. Importantly, copying homework problems that require analytic answers correlates with a 2.4 standard deviation decline for similar problems on exams but did not significantly correlate with gain on the Mechanics Baseline Test. Repetitive copiers initially had comparable ability in math in physics to non-copiers. Changes in course format and instructional practices that previous self-reported academic dishonesty surveys and the observed copying patterns suggested would reduce copying have been accompanied by more than a factor of four reduction of copying from about 11% of all electronic homework problems to less than 3%.
  Footnotes: None
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GF:

Research in Undergraduate Math Education
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 3:00PM
  Presider: John Thompson,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GF01:

Seeing Through Symbols: Personal and Cultural Semiotic Systems in Algebra
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Invited - Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College
607-274-7081, aweinberg@ithaca.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Algebraic symbolism plays a prominent role in mathematics. We try to teach our students to "see through the symbols" to focus on the underlying meaning of variables, functions, systems of equations, and other algebraic notation. Despite our best efforts, students frequently struggle to use algebraic notation meaningfully. The idea of personal and cultural semiotic systems gives us a new way of understanding how students work with algebraic symbols. Previous research on algebraic representation has attempted to describe either the ways students interpret symbols or the ways they produce symbols. In contrast, viewing students' work as part of a semiotic system unifies these perspectives, enabling us to describe the interaction between symbol production and interpretation. This presentation will introduce the idea of semiotic systems and look at examples of student work to illustrate the concept and show how it can be used to understand students' mathematical activity.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by John Thompson
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GF02:

The Functions of Examples in Instruction
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Invited - Tim Fukawa-Connelly, University of New Hampshire
603-862-3705, tim.fc@unh.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Examples are an important part of our teaching of mathematics and physics. Some of the ways that we might use examples in our teaching are to show how to use a formula, perform an algorithm, illustrate a theory, or help understand concepts. While these are relatively common, there are less common uses to which we might put examples that include having students recreate the fundamental ideas of our disciplines, develop their own original ideas, and develop ways of reasoning that support innovative thinking. In this presentation I will show examples of teachers in mathematics and physics drawing on different scientific functions that examples might serve in teaching at the university level. I will then suggest how instructor's uses of examples can communicate to students what it means to be a scientist, and, perhaps convey the wrong message about our respective disciplines. Or, good teaching may be leading to bad results?
  Footnotes: AAPT is sponsoring my presentation if that's what this box means.
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GF03:

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Applications
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Invited - Michael C. Oehrtman, University of Northern Colorado
970-351-2344, michael.oehrtman@unco.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Subtitle: Confessions of a Mathematician. In this talk I present findings from my design research using numerical methods and error analyses to establish a strong conceptual foundation for an introductory calculus and differential equations sequence. I will intersperse this discussion with reflections on my own experiences as a student of both mathematics and physics, as a mathematics faculty, and as an education researcher that led me to this approach. I will present results indicating that properly developed, an applied approach to calculus and differential equations can 1) be based on natural language and ideas directly accessible to students, 2) provide a coherent approach to the range of topics covered in the entire sequence, 3) be coherent in meaning and structure across multiple representations, and 4) establish a foundation for subsequent formal mathematical development. A natural hypothesis is that such an approach should also support modeling in science and engineering.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by John Thompson.
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GF04:

Learning for Transfer: How Much Does Context Matter?
  Location: SS Ballroom DE
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:30PM - 3:00PM
  Author: Invited - Joseph F. Wagner
Xavier University, Department of Mathematics & Computer Science
513-745-3834, wagner@xavier.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: “Transfer in pieces” is a theory of knowledge transfer that stands in contrast to longstanding theories of “transfer by abstraction.” It seems almost self-evident that knowledge of mathematics or science should be applicable across different contexts by virtue of its abstractness or distance from the contexts in which it was learned. Surely this has served as a basis for traditional instructional practices in mathematics and science. A transfer-in-pieces approach, however, suggests that the utility of abstract knowledge is somewhat illusory, and that the cognitive mechanisms of transfer are much more attuned to specific features of the contexts in which knowledge is applied. For learning theorists, this presentation offers an introductory tour of the basic tenets of a transfer-in-pieces consideration of the problem of transfer. For teachers, it suggests that the role of learning contexts and initial applications of knowledge may be both more significant and more limiting than we think.
  Footnotes: Sponsored by John R. Thompson, University of Maine
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GG:

Post Deadline II
  Location: HC 3048
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM
  Presider: Jeannette Lawler,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GH:

PER: Problem Solving II
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:30PM
  Presider: Andrew Heckler,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GH01:

Investigating Patterns in Response Times to Graph Questions
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:10PM
  Author: Andrew F. Heckler, Ohio State University
6149408003, heckler.6@osu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Thomas M. Scaife
  Abstract: We investigate patterns in response times as well as response choices to simple multiple-choice questions. In a series of experiments involving questions on graphs in which participants must compare the slopes of two points, we not only found (as expected) that many students consistently answered incorrectly, namely comparing heights rather than the slopes, but we also found that these students responded more rapidly than those answering correctly. Furthermore, by imposing a delay in responding of a few seconds, we found a reduction in incorrect responses, suggesting that many students were capable of answering correctly, but instead they tended to answer quickly. Repetitive training increases accuracy, and this may in part be due to a decrease in processing time of the relevant dimension, i.e. slope. However, providing students with an explicit rule also increases accuracy, but does not appear to change the time to process the correct response.
  Footnotes: None
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GH02:

Rigging Your Card Games -- Re-examining Expert Categorizations of Physics Problems
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:10PM - 1:20PM
  Author: Steven F. Wolf, Michigan State University
586-484-3661, wolfste4@msu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Gerd Kortemeyer
  Abstract: On its 30th anniversary, we are re-examining the seminal paper by Chi et al., which firmly established the notion that novices categorize physics problems by "surface features" (e.g. "incline," "pendulum," "projectile motion," ...), while experts use "deep structure" (e.g., "energy conservation," "Newton 2," ...). The paper has been cited more than 3000 times in scholarly articles over a wide range of disciplines. Yet, some details of the original research design of this card-sorting experiment and its analysis methods are not clear. In replicating the study, particularly the choice of problems seems to strongly influence the outcome; only a carefully "rigged" problem set will have a good signal-to-noise ratio. We replicated the experiment with an expert group, using a large set of problems, and noted the degree to which different specific subsets of problems lead to more or less clear-cut results.
  Footnotes: None
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GH03:

The Relationship between Students' Mental Representations and their Translational Skills
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:20PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Bashirah Ibrahim, Kansas State University
(785)3237794, bibrahim@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: We report on the relationship between students' categories of mental representations and their handling of multiple external representations. It is assumed that the inability to relate and translate information across different representations is governed by the kinds of internal constructs that students operate with. A sample of 19 participants from a calculus-based physics engineering course completed 13 tasks (non-directed and directed) on kinematics, work, and energy. Individual interviews were conducted with the students immediately following the completion of these tasks. Profiles were designed based on the students' actions when solving the problems together with their interview responses. The Johnson-Laird (1983) cognitive framework was used to categorize the students' internal constructs and statistical analysis was performed to determine whether or not a link exists with the ability to translate information across representations. The consequences of this work for the teaching and learning of physics at introductory level will be discussed. Supported in part by NSF grant 0816207.
  Footnotes: None
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GH04:

Visual Cueing Influencing Eye Movements and Reasoning in Physics Problems
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:30PM - 1:40PM
  Author: Adrian M. Madsen, Kansas State University
785-532-1612, adrianc@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Adam Larson, Lester Loschky, N. Sanjay Rebello
  Abstract: Visual cues overlaid on diagrams and animations can reduce cognitive load by drawing attention to relevant areas. Additionally, cues can increase speed and accuracy by causing learners to view a diagram in a pattern related to a problem's solution. We investigate the effects of visual cueing on students' eye movements and reasoning on introductory physics problems with a diagram. Students in the treatment group were shown an initial problem, and if they answered that incorrectly, they were shown a series of problems each with moving shapes cueing the correct solution. Students in the control group were also provided a series of problems, but without any visual cues. Students in both groups were asked to verbally explain their reasoning after each question, and were provided a transfer problem without cues at the end. We report on students' eye movements while answering the questions and verbal reasoning for their answers.
  Footnotes: None
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GH05:

A Bi-directional Mapping of Faculty Perceptions with a Problem Solving Rubric
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:40PM - 1:50PM
  Author: Brita L. Nellermoe
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; University of St. Thomas
612-625-9323, nell0021@umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): Andrew J. Mason, Kenneth J Heller
  Abstract: We examine a categorization of written problem solving artifacts generated by interviews of 30 faculty members at institutions from a variety of higher education institutions in the Midwestern U.S. (Yerushalmi et al. 2007, Henderson et al. 2007). We determine how these categories map to dimensions of a rubric designed for analysis of student problem solutions (Docktor 2009). This mapping examines both the relationship of the rubric to the categories and the categories to the rubric. The results suggest that the rubric dimensions for student problem solutions designed by Docktor emerge naturally from faculty perceptions. References: J. Docktor (2009). "Development and Validation of a Physics Problem-Solving Assessment Rubric." Dissertation, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN. E. Yerushalmi, C. Henderson, K. Heller, P. Heller, and V. Kuo (2007). Phys. Rev. Special Topics-PER 3(2), 020109. C. Henderson, E.Yerushalmi, K. Heller, P. Heller, and V. Kuo (2007). Phys. Rev. Special Topics-PER 3(2), 020110.
  Footnotes: None
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GH06:

Using Analogical Problem Solving to Learn about Friction
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:50PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh
412-624-9045, clsingh@pitt.edu
  Co-Author(s): Shih-Yin Lin
  Abstract: Research suggests many students have the notion that the magnitude of the static frictional force is always equal to its maximum value. In this study, we examine introductory students' ability to perform analogical problem solving between two problems that are similar in the application of a physics principle (Newton's second law) but one problem involves friction which often triggers the misleading notion that is not applicable in that particular case. Students from algebra- and calculus- based introductory physics courses were asked in a quiz to take advantage of what they learned from a solved problem provided, which was about tension in a rope, to solve another problem involving friction. To help students process through the analogy deeply and contemplate the applicability of associating the frictional force with its maximum value, students in different recitation classrooms received different scaffolding. Students' performances in different groups are compared. Supported by NSF.
  Footnotes: None
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GH07:

Enhancing the Problem Solving Abilities of Science Students
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:10PM
  Author: Olga A. Stafford, South Dakota State University
605-688-4293, Olga.Stafford@sdstate.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: It is evident from my own teaching experience, and supported by many instructors’ opinions [1-3], that students aren’t equipped with logical problem-solving techniques. I am studying the impact on student learning of using problem-solving sheets during recitation classes, with students working in groups and playing specific roles. I anticipate that successful use of problem-solving sheets will help students develop the necessary skills to solve science problems with conceptual understanding. 1. Polya, How t Solve It (Princeton University Press, 1945) 2. Edit Yerushalmi etc".Instructors' reasons for choosing problem features in a calculus-based introductory physics course," Phys. Rev. Phys. Ed. Research 6, 020108 (2010) 3. Johnson, Johnson & Smit, "Active learning: cooperation in the classroom," Interaction Book Company 1998
  Footnotes: None
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GH08:

Students' Epistemological Beliefs vis-à-vis Problem Solving Sophistication in M&I Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:10PM - 2:20PM
  Author: Wendi N. Wampler, Purdue University
3179971816, wamplerw@purdue.edu
  Co-Author(s): Lynn A. Bryan, Mark P Haugan
  Abstract: In this study, we investigated the relationship between students' personal epistemological beliefs and problem solving sophistication within the context of a large-scale implementation of the M&I Curriculum. We utilized a mixed methods approach to follow the progress of nine student volunteers from the introductory mechanics course at Purdue University. The quantitative component used the CLASS survey to examine the epistemological beliefs of students over the semester. The qualitative component examined students' problem solving within the context of small group work, as well as epistemological beliefs in the context of the post recitation interviews. Results showed three major trends: a decrease in sophistication of both problem solving and epistemological beliefs, a high level of sophistication of both with little change throughout the semester, and increase in both epistemological beliefs and problem solving. The implications will help us better understand the importance of epistemological beliefs and their influence on students' problem solving.
  Footnotes: None
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GH09:

Assessing Student's Ability to Solve Textbook-Style Problems
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:20PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Jeffrey Marx, McDaniel College
4103864619, jmarx@mcdaniel.edu
  Co-Author(s): Karen Cummings
  Abstract: Development of student' problem solving ability is commonly cited as one of the primary goals in introductory physics courses. However, there is no broadly agreed upon definition of what is meant by "problem solving". Most physicists ultimate want students to be able to successfully apply a logical yet flexible approach to solving real world problems significantly different from any they have seen before. Still, many introductory instructors are first and foremost concerned with how successfully and thoughtfully students solve standard textbook‑style problems. We have developed a 13‑item survey to help assess students' abilities at solving textbook‑style problems. In the Fall semesters of 2009 and 2010, we beta‑tested this instrument on introductory physics students (pre‑instruction and post‑instruction) at several institutes and on a pool of "experts." In this talk, we will present details of the survey instrument, its administration, and some results from our beta testing.
  Footnotes: None
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HA:

PERC Bridging Session
  Location: Hixson-Lied
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 3:15PM - 4:45PM
  Presider: TBA
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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HA01:

Complex Interactions between Formative Assessment, Technology, and Classroom Practices
  Location: Hixson-Lied
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 3:15PM - 4:45PM
  Author: Invited - Edward Price, California State University San Marcos
7607508040, eprice@csusm.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Interactive engagement (IE) methods provide instructors with evidence of student thinking that can guide instructional decisions across a range of timescales: facilitating an activity, determining the flow of activities, or modifying the curriculum. Thus, from the instructor's perspective, IE activities can function as formative assessments. As a practical matter, the ability to utilize this potential depends on how the activities are implemented. This talk will describe different tools for small group problem solving, including whiteboards, Tablet PCs, digital cameras, and photosharing websites. These tools provide the instructor with varying levels access to student work during and after class, and therefore provide a range of support for formative assessment. Furthermore, the tools differ in physical size, ease of use, and the roles for students and instructor. These differences lead to complex, often surprising interactions with classroom practices.
  Footnotes: None
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HA02:

Assessment Lessons from K-12 Education Research: Knowledge Representation, Learning, and Motivation
  Location: Hixson-Lied
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 3:15PM - 4:45PM
  Author: Invited - Lorrie A. Shepard, University of Colorado, Boulder
303.492.6937, lorrie.shepard@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: For 30 years, research on the effects of high-stakes testing in K-12 schools has documented the negative effects of teaching to the test. Most obvious is the reduction or elimination of time spent on science and social studies instruction, especially in high poverty schools. Less obvious is the harm to student learning in reading and mathematics when instruction is limited to repetitive drill on worksheets that closely resemble test formats. The lack of generalized, flexible understanding of underlying principles in K-12 tested subjects is similar to Mazur's experience with plug-and-chug versus conceptual test questions. The PER community is well aware of the importance of more complete representation of learning goals as a remedy to this problem. Equally important, however, are the assessment "processes," especially feedback and grading, that can either promote or deter students' engagement and willingness to take responsibility for their own learning. In this talk, I summarize learning and motivation research that has particular bearing on effective classroom assessment practices in K-12 classrooms certainly and even in university courses.
  Footnotes: None
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PD:

Ceremonial Session: Klopsteg and Distinguished Service Awards
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 10:15AM - 11:30AM
  Presider: David Cook,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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PD01:

Halting Human-Made Climate Change: The Case for Young People and Nature
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 10:15AM - 11:30AM
  Author: Plenary - James E. Hansen,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Humans are now the dominant force driving climate change. The nature of the climate system -- its "inertia" and "tipping points" - makes the matter urgent. Business-as-usual would hand our children a situation out of their control - continually shifting shorelines, as many as half of all species committed to extinction, increasing climate extremes with greater floods, droughts, fires and stronger storms. Government policies are nearly useless. The intergenerational injustice raises a profound moral issue, as greenwashing governments feign ignorance of the actual situation and the fecklessness of their policies. The tragedy is that a simple honest solution is possible -- one that stimulates the economy, phases out fossil fuel addiction, and stabilizes climate -- but it requires putting the public's interest above that of special financial interests. Adults must unite with young people in a campaign to force well-oiled coal-fired governments, through legal remedies and democratic processes, to tell the truth and do their job.
  Footnotes: None
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PD02:

Summer 2011 Distinguished Service Citation Awardee
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 10:15AM - 11:30AM
  Author: Plenary - Steve Turley,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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PD03:

Summer 2011 Distinguished Service Citation Awardee
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 10:15AM - 11:30AM
  Author: Plenary - John Roeder,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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PD04:

Summer 2011 Distinguished Service Citation Awardee
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 10:15AM - 11:30AM
  Author: Plenary - Todd Leif,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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PD05:

Summer 2011 Distinguished Service Citation Awardee
  Location: Hixson-Lied Auditorium - Harper Center
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 10:15AM - 11:30AM
  Author: Plenary - Drew Isola,
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: None
  Footnotes: None
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