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WM14 Program

Sessions, Panels, Posters, Plenaries, Committee Meetings, and Special Events

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Posters

  • SPS Research and Outreach Poster Session

      • A Comparative Analysis of Atwood's Machine Configurations

      • SPS01
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Thomas Predey
      • Type: Poster
      • We are studying the effects of different pulley configurations on the Atwood's machine. The goal is to determine if the number of pulleys in the system affects the accuracy of the measurements. We are testing the claim that a two-pulley system yields more accurate results than a single pulley setup. We investigated the performance of each system as we varied the masses involved. This project provides a detailed comparative analysis of the pulleys' role in the Atwood's machine setup.
      • Measuring and Modeling a Boleadora

      • SPS02
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Jacob Brooks
      • Type: Poster
      • The effects of the throwing technique on the motion of a boleadora in flight were investigated. The boleadora is an ancient hunting weapon made of three individual masses connected by rope to a common knot. The dynamics of the boleadora depend on whether it is thrown by the knot or by one of the masses. A computational model was developed for each throwing technique. Predictions of the models were compared to results from 3D video analysis. The models and results from video analysis for the two throwing techniques will be presented.
      • Physics of Stringed Instruments

      • SPS03
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Katarzyna Pomian
      • Type: Poster
      • We are studying the properties of stringed instruments that contribute to their unique sounds and yet, set them apart. The goal is to understand how stringed instruments function, and what sets the different instruments apart in sound and function. We have analyzed the string resonances and body properties of 13 instruments including some of the lesser studied ones. We analyzed sound data for each instrument under different initial conditions. The strings were excited at different locations using various techniques, such as plucking and bowing. We also took high-speed videos for a better understanding of the wave generated by each instrument. Body analysis using Chladi patterns helped us to observe the properties of the bodies. A cross comparison of the instruments revealed variances in the sound, based upon the unique characteristics of each instrument. This project provides a comprehensive analysis of stringed instruments.
      • Springs Released From Uniform Circular Motion -- The Slinky Drop Extended

      • SPS04
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Matthew Carnaghi
      • Type: Poster
      • The path of a spring released from uniform circular motion was investigated and compared to a computational model. This study is an extension of the "Slinky drop" experiment, which consists of holding the top of a SlinkyTM above the ground, allowing it to stretch due to the gravitational force, and releasing it from rest. For the falling slinky the bottom portion of the slinky remains stationary until the slinky collapses. Similarly, for a spring in uniform circular motion, the spring is not uniformly stretched but is most stretched near the center of the circle. When released, it is expected that the furthest end of the spring will continue in uniform circular motion until the spring has collapsed. Video analysis was used to measure the motion of a spring released from uniform circular motion, and results were compared to a computational model of the system. It was found that the free end of the spring continues in uniform circular motion after the fixed end is released and before the spring fully collapses.
      • Investigating Traditional Methods of Inertial Navigation versus Using a Smartphone

      • SPS05
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Timothy Slesinger
      • Type: Poster
      • Inertial navigation has long been used for measurement of position and orientation in commercial travel (boats, planes), but the systems are complicated and expensive. GPS is good for two-dimensional positioning on the surface of the Earth, but not for orientation or altitude, and GPS signals are not always available. Inertial navigation systems are self-contained and do not require communication with an outside agent. Very recent improvements in micro-machined electromechanical systems (MEMS) have made the application of inertial navigation techniques easily available. We became interested in this project through our work in mapping roller coaster rides. We will report on our efforts to develop techniques of averaging, noise-reduction, and reduction of drift in a navigation signal generated by accelerometers and gyroscopes. In addition, we show a comparison of research-grade inertial navigation equipment to the sensors built into a standard smartphone.
      • A Novel Low-cost Gamma Ray Spectroscopy for Undergraduate Physics Labs

      • SPS06
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Abaz Kryemadhi
      • Type: Poster
      • Gamma Ray Spectroscopy has been traditionally expensive for physics labs due to needs for multichannel analyzers and/or NIM crates. We have been able to design a low-cost gamma ray spectroscopy for physics labs using a silicon photomultiplier as a photodetector, a LYSO crystal for scintillation, and a typical digital oscilloscope with Labview. The method we use does not only provide low-cost gamma ray spectra from different isotopes but also unlike the black box approach in multichannel analyzers, it provides opportunities for undergraduate students to be familiar with detection techniques in particle and nuclear physics.
      • Scintillator Studies for Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) Experiment

      • SPS07
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Abaz Kryemadhi
      • Type: Poster
      • We spent this past summer studying scintillators for a neutron veto for CDMS Experiment. The CDMS searches for Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs) using germanium crystals kept at milliKelvin and it is currently located at Soudan mine in Minnesota. The superCDMS which will be the next phase of CDMS, will be located at SNOLAB in a deep mine in Canada. Neutron Veto is one of possible active sub-detectors to be deployed in order to tag neutrons which carry similar signature to WIMPS. We studied different scintillators and different photo-detectors in search of high light yield and low-cost detector prototype. We collaborated with Fermi National Laboratory CDMS group and were sponsored by Department of Energy under Visiting Faculty Team grant.
      • Growth of Metal Nanostructures via Physical Vapor Deposition

      • SPS08
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Richard Floyd
      • Type: Poster
      • We have used a low-cost single zone tube furnace to fabricate metal nanostructures on silicon substrates. Specifically, we evaporate copper, zinc, and gold and control furnace properties such as temperature, carrier gas pressure and composition, and the distance from the evaporant to the substrate to enhance nanowire growth. This project should lead to the creation of a new, advanced laboratory activity for physics majors.
      • Metal Nanoparticle Enhanced Zinc Oxide Photodetectors

      • SPS09
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Cody Thompson
      • Type: Poster
      • We present an investigation into the device characteristics of zinc oxide thin-film photodetectors grown via a sol-gel technique. Specifically, we compare properties of devices having active layers doped with varying concentrations of silver nanoparticles. We have also investigated the effect on device characteristics when active layers are grown on top of periodic silver nanostructure plasmonic waveguides. Devices where fabricated by spin coating zinc acetate sol-gels on sapphire substrates. Doping was achieved using varying concentrations of silver nitrate. Waveguides consist of periodic silver nanostructures grown on substrates using electrodeposition through 200 nm alumina filters. Silver interdigitated contacts were then applied via photolithography and sputter deposition for all devices. The current-voltage and transient ultraviolet photoresponse behaviors for all devices where determined. Optimizing the responsivity and sensitivity of ZnO photodetector devices to UV light is key for future real-world applications.
      • Current Distribution on a Two-Dimensional Plane

      • SPS10
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Claire Soupene
      • Type: Poster
      • We studied the current distribution generated by a source and a sink on a two-dimensional plane. We developed a theoretical model for the distribution, carried out a detailed experimental investigation, and analyzed our data using our theoretical model as well as a model commonly used in the electronics industry.
      • Electron Transport in Hall Trusters

      • SPS11
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Russell Swinton
      • Type: Poster
      • Electron transport in Hall thrusters has been long known to deviate from classical predictions based on particle collisions. As a consequence, our ability to predict basic features such as current-voltage curves for plasma discharge is limited. In this paper we present a hybrid fluid, particle in cell model for Hall thruster plasmas in axial and azimuthal coordinates. The goal of this investigation is to determine the role of azimuthal physics on the overall plasma discharge, paying particular attention to internal fluctuations and electron transport dynamics. Results from the simulations reveal long wavelength (m<5), low frequency (<100 kHz), correlated tilted structures, which result in enhanced electron transport. This is in qualitative agreement with experiments. Results from our simulations will be compared with experimental data from Stanford's Hall thruster.
      • Broadening Participation of SBIR/STTR Research Experiences for Secondary Students

      • SPS12
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Steve Griffin
      • Type: Poster
      • Research experiences for high school students in the STEM real-world setting are uncommon. By reaching out to high school students and teachers, small businesses involved in innovation partnerships can produce collective teams generating important research and human resources for a growing economy. The National Science Foundation Directorate for Engineering Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships encourages high school students and teachers to work collaboratively with Small Business Innovative Research grantees and Small Business Technology Transfer grantees motivating more young people into considering a vocation in a STEM related field. With a high demand for a workforce trained in science and engineering the possibilities for business incorporating research with a trained workforce could provide an extraordinary return. More importantly, the opportunity for under-represented groups to participate in scientific research could be monumental.
      • Development of Feasible Science Activities in Elementary School

      • SPS13
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Jaime Demick
      • Type: Poster
      • A broad understanding of science topics in elementary-age students is vital to the cognitive development of the student. Students who perceive achievement in scientific topics and who actively learn and retain basic scientific principles and information at a young age increase their likelihood of success in these topical areas in middle and high school. With this premise in mind, Huntingdon College students worked with a faculty member to develop curriculum-based science modules incorporating the science standards of the state of Alabama. This project resulted in the production of several science booklets for student use and step-by-step guides for instructors to lead inexpensive, easy, hands-on student activities that addressed grade-level standards in an exciting and memorable fashion.
      • Local University Astronomy Club + Local High School Astronomy Club = Success!

      • SPS14
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Kathleen Gustavson
      • Type: Poster
      • Having a RET position at the local university with a faculty-led astronomyclub has opened a wide door, for both myself and my students. There now exists a partnership between the astronomy club at the local university (UWM) and the astronomy club at my high school (Nicolet HS). I frequently take my students to UWM for the meetings, where they enjoy talks by undergrads, graduates, post docs, faculty, and guest speakers. The occasional field trips are also enjoyed. Processed radio data is available for the students to search for pulsars. From these opportunities, the students get first-hand knowledge of the processes of science at the university level. They see the research positions available to undergraduates and graduate students, and the in-depth work the faculty does in their own research.
      • Measurements, Sensors, and Detectors: The 2013 SPS SOCK

      • SPS15
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Nicole Quist
      • Type: Poster
      • The advancement of science requires the advancement of measurement and detection standards. The Society of Physics Students (SPS) partnered with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to create Science Outreach Catalyst Kit (SOCK). The theme for the SOCK activities and demonstrations focused on Measurement, Sensors, and Detectors. Half of the kit focused on measurement activities and the need for standards, while the other half focused on detectors using the modular Theremin. These hands-on kits will be sent out to SPS chapters throughout the nation to use in their communities to heighten interest in science. We were able to test the kits with middle school science teachers who were attending the Summer Institute for Middle School Teachers at NIST and integrate their feedback.
      • Stratospheric Thermal Wake Investigation

      • SPS16
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Mara Blish
      • Type: Poster
      • We present data characterizing the thermal wake that trails below ascending high-altitude balloons (AKA weather balloons) as they ascend into the stratosphere. This wake, which is warmer than the ambient air during the day but colder during night flights, is reported to be significant within 25 feet of the base of the balloon. We have built and flown a "wake boom" that hangs below latex weather balloons with a 1-D array of temperature sensors that extends horizontally from directly beneath the balloon to outside of the predicted width of the thermal wake. We present analysis of the temperature profiles collected utilizing this apparatus.
      • Undergraduates Building a High Performance Cluster

      • SPS17
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by William Dixon
      • Type: Poster
      • High-performance computing is becoming a necessity to universities. Setting up such a device requires money and patience. First, figure out the hardware that the university would make use of. GPUs are great for simple algorithms, but CPUs are better for heavy programming. Once hardware is figured out, then networking and configuration is yet another task. Configuring takes most of the time tweaking the cluster for administrators ease and for the user's use. This project is supported by the NSF EPSCoR RII Track 1 cooperative agreement awarded to the University of South Carolina.
      • GPUs: What Language Do You Speak?

      • SPS18
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Tiffany Prosser
      • Type: Poster
      • We present the results of an undergraduate research project that explores the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for scientific computing. In recent years GPUs have become popular for scientific computing due to their ability to provide massive parallelism (with thousands of cores) at a reasonable price. Since GPUs are still relatively foreign to most people, we present a comparison of a few basic GPU programming languages. These languages includes CUDA and OpenACC. CUDA C is an extended version of C/C++. OpenACC (accULL and PGI) is a programming standard that allows FORTRAN and C/C++ programmers to easily take advantage of CPU/GPU systems.
      • Analyzing Images of 2010ih

      • SPS19
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Dorothy Dickson-Vandervelde
      • Type: Poster
      • SN 2010ih is a type Ia supernova that is thought to come from a binary star system in which at least one of the stars is a white dwarf. The white dwarf gains mass until it reaches the Chandrasekhar limit, where the pressure and temperature set off a runaway thermonuclear explosion. We plan to analyze the light curve of the supernova to characterize the late-time behavior of the supernova and also to figure out the distribution of the different radioactive isotopes. I reduced and combined images of the Supernova 2010ih and then analyzed it for brightness and began the formation of a light curve, which is a graph of magnitude verses time. SN 2010ih was observed on January 10 and 11, 2011, about five months after it was discovered, at Kitt Peak National Observatory with the 4m Mayall Telescope in the visible light bands B, V, R, and I. I used the software Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) to analyze and reduce the images. I removed bad pixels and crosstalk, subtracted the darks and the zeros, divided out the flats, fit the image to a world coordinate system, and then combined the images into a final image, for each filter; B, V, R, and I. After achieving the four final images, I found the magnitude for the supernova and thirty field stars using a standard star field.
      • STEM Education and the Federal Government

      • SPS20
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Dayton Syme
      • Type: Poster
      • On April 14th, 2013 the President of the United States put forth an aggressive budgetary plan for Fiscal Year 2014 that included changes in funding and a reorganization of programs that support STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) education. The proposed changes drew support and harsh criticism from both parties. Together, the American Physical Society and American Institute of Physics supported a Society of Physics Students undergraduate intern to work at the Department of Education for the summer of 2013. I spent the summer researching and helping to develop STEM education policies, laying the groundwork for a new APS/AIP/AAAS fellow position that has since been approved. In this poster I will describe my work, the events that led up to what was called the STEM Reorganization, and preview what can be expected with regard to STEM education from the Department of Education and beyond.
      • Assessing Social Deficits in Two Mouse Models of Disease

      • SPS21
      • Sat 01/04, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • by Christopher Hollingsworth
      • Type: Poster
      • Many neuropsychiatric diseases are associated with communication or socialdeficits. Here we report on the usefulness of an adult ultrasonic vocalization (USV) paradigm as an assay of social communication. This paradigm consists of recording the USVs of adult male mice in response to sexual/social stimuli. Solitary male mice are recorded in a baseline condition for a fixed time . Then either a female mouse or female urine soaked bedding is added to the chamber and the male mouse's responses are recorded. The recorded vocalizations are analyzed for number of calls before and after the stimuli, latency to first call, and other spectral and timing parameters. We present preliminary results from the application of this paradigm to assay for social communication deficits in two mouse models of disease, a fragile X syndrome (FXS) model mouse with altered Kv4.2 expression, and a mouse model of childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI).
  • Technologies Posters

      • Gauging Effectiveness of Pen-based Computing for Collaborative Introductory Physics Problem Solving

      • PST1E01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Duncan Cantrell
      • Type: Poster
      • Advancements in pen-input computing technology combined with synchronouslyinteractive software opened new venues for promoting active instruction and collaborative problem solving [1]. The research goal of the present study was to isolate the effect of the methodology itself from that of the involved educational technology. We repeated the comparison of the performance of students taking the same introductory physics lecture course while enrolled in two separate problem-solving sections [2]. One section used tablet PCs to facilitate group problem solving while the other section used whiteboards or paper for one third of the semester (covering Kinematics). Sections then traded technologies for the middle third of the term (covering Dynamics). For the last segment of the semester, students were free to choose between tablet PCs or low tech. Preliminary analysis of quiz, exam and standardized pre-post test results indicate primacy of methodology over technology for student learning.
      • Simulating Simple Roller Coaster Physics for Animation and Interactive Applets

      • PST1E03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Michael Gallis
      • Type: Poster
      • This poster presents the underlying physics used to simulate motions typically discussed under the auspices of "Roller Coaster Physics" in animation and an interactive java applet used in introductory physics. The car is modeled as a mass moving along a parametric curve, either at constant speed or coasting (with and without friction). Generating solutions to the resulting equations of motion places some constraints on the parametric equations describing the path of the track through space. The resulting materials are used to explore topics such as energy, power, circular motion, reaction forces and friction. In order to dramatize the repercussions of failing to loop at sufficient speed, collision dynamics are employed to simulate the car bounding off of the track and ground. Visual materials generated using the model are available online.(1,2)
  • Astronomy Poster

      • How Did the Moon Form? Evaluating Alternative Explanations

      • PST1A01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Doug Lombardi
      • Type: Poster
      • Scientifically literate citizens need to understand how scientists evaluate competing explanations. Likewise, science learning demands that students increase their ability to critically evaluate scientific knowledge and weigh alternative explanations. Our poster introduces an instructional scaffold--the model-evidence link (MEL) diagram--designed to promote students' ability to critically evaluate scientific explanations and knowledge of fundamental concepts. The structure and mode of MEL diagrams were originally developed by Rutgers University researchers under a NSF-supported middle school life science project (Chinn & Buckland, 2012). We adapted their format and created a MEL diagram around a compelling astronomy topic: the Moon's formation. Students draw arrows in different shapes to indicate the degree of support between lines of evidence and two models of the Moon's formation. By engaging in the MEL, students use critical evaluation in weighing the connections between these lines of evidence and the alternative explanations to gain a deeper understanding about the Moon.
      • More Effective Use of Video Watching in ASTRO 101

      • PST1A03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Timothy Slater
      • Type: Poster
      • Online, freely available, high-definition video productions on astronomy include high-quality simulations with precise explanations and are poised to greatly benefit the learning of ASTRO 101 astronomy students. At the same time, some faculty are understandably reluctant to assign videos to students because of difficulties in making students accountable. Moreover, for students who are taking courses via distance learning technologies and MOOCs, developing pedagogical strategies to use some of these new videos to effectively teach off-campus students is even more critical. In response, we are experimenting with creating highly structured video discussion guide worksheets to mediate students' engagement with videos. We have developed three different styles of questions for a variety of 45-60 min. videos, where we pose: 4-8 factual questions, 2-4 synthesis & evaluation questions, and 1-2 self-reflection questions.
  • Labs/Apparatus Posters

      • Acoustic Wave Lab for Introductory and Upper Level Physics Majors

      • PST1B01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Daniel Hartman
      • Type: Poster
      • Iowa Doppler Products' (IDP) instrumentation has been used to measure the speed of sound through a variety of media. Other measurements, such as a single slit experiment and refraction at a corner, have also been performed. Errors in the speed of sound in water were typically about 0.5%. This equipment will be used in the University of West Georgia's (UWG) introductory honors physics lab and upper level experimental physics labs. The tool's versatility also will allow for multiple junior and senior level research projects for our undergraduate majors.
      • Using Arduino and a Microphone to Listen for Time

      • PST1B03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Jeffrey Groff
      • Type: Poster
      • An Arduino microcontroller, electret microphone, and an operation amplifier provide a low-cost setup for measuring the intervals of time between intermittent sounds. The hardware and software components of this apparatus are described, and the apparatus is demonstrated by measuring the frequency of a spinning motor and the coefficient of restitution of a bouncing ball.
      • Speed of Mechanical Waves: Lab Exercises with Free Software and Hardware

      • PST1B05
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Fabian Martinez
      • Type: Poster
      • Some ways to measure speed of mechanical waves on diverse media is presented in this poster. Using ideas introduced by B. Jones and others, we improve them using easy setup hardware and free license software in the physics lab.
      • Redesign of Introductory Mechanics Labs to Increase Retention and Graduation of STEM Students

      • PST1B07
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Nina Abramzon
      • Type: Poster
      • Programs aimed at increasing retention and graduation rates of STEM students have been implemented at Cal Poly Pomona and at Norco College. As part of these programs there were interventions done to the freshman physics labs. The new labs were designed to follow the inquiry-based approach. The design elements will be presented in detail together with assessment of student learning and student attitudes.
      • Measuring Fluorescence and Absorption in Caramelized Sugar Glass

      • PST1B09
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by William Heffner
      • Type: Poster
      • While using home-molded optical elements made from candy glass (hard candy) and a green laser, we also observed a distinct, lower wavelength emission form the candy. We present here our apparatus and results for measuring the fluorescence and absorption observed in the sugar glass (hard candy) using the student grade Ocean Optics Red Tide Spectrometer. The fluorescence was found to span between about 470 nm and 650 nm and the emission demonstrated a marked drop in intensity for LED excitation below green. Absorption was measured with the Red Tide and with a commercial spectrometer for comparison. Both fluorescence and absorption increased significantly with further cooking (caramelization). Literature suggests that the fluorescence and absorption can be attributed to the formation of carbon nanoparticles. We propose that our Red Tide Spectrometer based experiment would be an interesting and appropriate one for an undergraduate lab in physics, chemistry or material science.
      • Some Characteristics of Wetland Water through Open Source Spectrometry

      • PST1B11
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by John Zafra
      • Type: Poster
      • Using the low-cost spectrometer proposal carried out by publiclaboratory.org team and free video and photography analysis software, we have developed an initial physical-chemical characterization of the water of the Torca wetland in chemistry and physics high school classroom and we identified the presence of some contaminants. Our purpose is to determine the environmental impact that such contaminants have in this ecosystem.
      • How Weight Influences Lift

      • PST1B13
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Jeff Mays*
      • Type: Poster
      • Every time an aircraft, whether a private Cessna or a multimillion-dollar jumbo jet, takes off, weight is always an important key variable. The amount of weight an airplane can hold is limited. In my experiment, I will be testing on how different increments of weight affect the lift of a particular plane. This test involves showing the problems that every day engineers face when building and testing aircraft. I will test this experiment by using an R/C airplane and different masses placed at the center of gravity to determine the distance required to take off. What is the mathematical relationship between take-off distance and load?
      • What Can You Do with PSoC?

      • PST1B15
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Jacob Millspaw
      • Type: Poster
      • If you had a single device that could do reconfigurable active analog circuitry, reconfigurable digital circuitry, on the fly pulse width modulation, capacitive sensing, reconfigurable pin out, analog to digital conversion, digital to analog conversion, what would you do? What could you build?
      • Lessons Learned Implementing Online Laboratories at the University of Arkansas

      • PST1B17
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by John Stewart
      • Type: Poster
      • To increase access and to improve ease of transfer, the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville will be offering its first-semester, calculus-based physics class online to all 11 campuses of the University of Arkansas system beginning in the spring 2014 semester. This requires implementation of online laboratory experiences that were piloted at the Fayetteville campus during the fall 2013 semester. These laboratories used a mix of simulations and video recording of experiments to replace face-to-face laboratories. The interactive nature of the face-to-face laboratory was partially replaced by inserting quiz questions at points in the laboratory. A video recording of the instructor discussing each quiz question was made available to the students. This poster will report on the lessons learned in this project.
  • Physics Education Research Posters

      • Japanese Pre-concepts of Force and Motion Probed by the FCI

      • PST1C03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Michi Ishimoto
      • Type: Poster
      • The Force and Concept Inventory (FCI) is used around the world to assess students' understanding of force and motion. The FCI has been translated into over 21 languages. Because Japanese belongs to a different language family from the Indo-European language family (to which English belongs), it is important to validate the translation of the FCI from English into Japanese. Translation requires a proper selection of words and writing styles, which may influence students' response choices. Based on the classical test theory, the results of reliability and discrimination testing of the translated version indicate that it is a high-quality test. An analysis of individual items shows that the surveyed Japanese students exhibited the same most commonsense concepts about motion and force (e.g. impetus and active force) as those of American students. The probed concepts are compared to concepts introduced in the taxonomy of misconceptions.
      • Development of a Standardized Static Fluids Assessment

      • PST1C07
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by DJ Wagner
      • Type: Poster
      • We are developing an FCI-style assessment covering static fluids topics commonly included in introductory physics courses. Beta versions have been sent to other institutions, and we are continuing to refine the assessment. This poster will focus on our efforts to identify which conceptions persist into our target audience of late high school and introductory college students. We're particularly interested in receiving suggestions from other educators and in recruiting more beta-testers. Stop by and chat!
      • Explicit Instruction in Metacognition: An Example from Physics

      • PST1C09
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Alistair McInerny
      • Type: Poster
      • Metacognition, or "thinking about thinking", is known to be involved in expert learning, but is generally difficult to observe. At Western Washington University, exercises have been created and administered in introductory course labs in order to (1) help students develop metacognitive skills, and (2) allow researchers to characterize facility with those skills. A rubric has been developed to code and analyze students' written responses. Initial application of the rubric suggests that analysis of this kind can lead to useful insights. With the use of a more detailed and comprehensive rubric, it should be possible to make concrete claims about student metacognitive thinking in physics and the development of student metacognitive abilities facilitated by instruction.
      • Probing Visual-Spatial Abilities in Relation to Specific Reasoning Approaches

      • PST1C11
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Alexandra Lau
      • Type: Poster
      • There are several different lines of reasoning students employ when they attempt to solve the wave tasks administered in introductory physics courses. We speculated that students' visual-spatial abilities may be related to the reasoning approaches they used on the wave tasks. We used the Paper Folding Test (PFT) to measure students' visual-spatial skills. We have observed notable differences in the PFT scores between specific categories of reasoning approaches used in solving wave tasks.
  • Pre-college/Informal and Outreach Posters

      • AAPT's PhysicsBowl: A Contest for High Schools

      • PST1D01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Michael Faleski
      • Type: Poster
      • The PhysicsBowl is an annual contest for high school students. The contestitself is 40 multiple-choice questions in length to be answered in no more than 45 minutes. There are about 5000 students participating from more than 250 schools across the world. In the past few years, schools have competed from the United States, Canada, China, Taiwan, Japan, Spain, the Republic of Korea, and Italy. Prizes are awarded to both the students and schools for high performers. This poster is to give high school teachers more information about the contest.
      • International Young Physicists Tournament-- For High School Students Around the World

      • PST1D03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Donald Franklin
      • Type: Poster
      • IYPT will be held in Shrewsbury, United Kingdom in July of 2014. This contest has 17 questions that are used for the Physics Fights between high school students from different countries. The teams take turns in the role of Reporter, Opponent, and Reviewer. The top three point winners advance to the final Physics Fight to determine the winner.
      • Dealing with Climate Myths

      • PST1D05
      • Mon 01/06, 8:00AM - 8:45AM
      • by Gordon Aubrecht
      • Type: Poster
      • Many scientists understand that climate change has a sociopolitical aspect, but some scientists are unwilling to address the issue lest they be perceived as political themselves. Nevertheless, when we scientists find climate myths, I think it is our duty as scientists to be willing to debunk them. This poster exhibits some myths and contrasts them with the science.
  • Technologies Posters

      • Using 3D Game Engines to Overcome Naive Concepts of Motion

      • PST1E02
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Andre Bresges
      • Type: Poster
      • During childhood and youth, students build up a number of naive concepts of motion that help them to cope with the behavior of real-world objects around them. As Driver [5,6], diSessa and others pointed out, this naive concept of motion may work as a serious obstacle towards deeper understanding of scientific concepts of motion. We use the 3D Game Engine "Unity 3d" to develop a rich surrounding, in which tossing a ball can be analyzed in multiple perspectives to overcome classical naive concepts. This is embedded in a lab assignment, consisting of several hands-on experiments and motion capturing tasks. Naive concepts of learners are discussed based on the outcome.
  • Astronomy Poster

      • Parallax Lab for Introductory Astronomy Students

      • PST1A02
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Amanda Mashburn
      • Type: Poster
      • Parallax is the angular displacement in apparent position of a celestial body, most commonly a star, when observed from two widely separated lines of sight. Parallax, measured in arc seconds, is inversely proportional to its distance in parsecs. A daytime lab has been created and tested to give students experience measuring the parallax angle of campus objects and calculating the distances to them. Students learn that it is possible to calculate these distances accurately without directly measuring them. A Brunton surveyor's compass was used to measure the bearings along two lines of sight to obtain a parallax angle. In a typical trial, a baseline of 16.5 m has a parallax angle of 7.8 degrees; the actual distance is 117.5 m, and the calculated distance being 117.9 m.
  • Labs/Apparatus Posters

      • An Inexpensive Quantitative Demonstration of Harmonics in Piped Sound Makers

      • PST1B02
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Stephen Minnick
      • Type: Poster
      • A simple inexpensive activity, which can be included as part of a larger laboratory experiment, utilizes open-source software and a computer microphone to display the harmonics of open and closed end pipes. Students calculate the theoretical frequencies produced by blowing across the top of short lengths of PVC tubing and compare them to the display of actual frequencies present.
      • Spy Physics: Using a Laser to "Hear" a Conversation

      • PST1B04
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Timothy Grove
      • Type: Poster
      • We will present a simply constructed laser experiment for students beyond their first year in physics. The goal of this particular experiment is to not only give students experience with laser interferometry, but to allow students to have greater excitement than they would normally get counting fringes or making precision measurements. Our experiment started when a student asked "Is it true that you could use a laser beam to detect a conversation in an office by its reflection off of a window." To accomplish this task we used a simple Michelson interferometer in which one mirror vibrated in response to a sound source. A speaker connected to a radio inside a small box with a tinted glass window served as a mirror for the laser beam and also represented the office that we were "spying upon." At present time, we have tried the experiment in two different ways-- one in which the sound source is directly connected to the mirror (the easy version) and one in which the sound must propagate through air to vibrate the mirror (the harder version). We will demonstrate our results if the audio equipment is willing.
      • Sound Pressure Dependence on the Air Temperature and Air Pressure

      • PST1B06
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Dongryul Jeon
      • Type: Poster
      • As is often demonstrated in physics classes, sound cannot be heard withoutair. We investigated the propagation of sound when the air pressure was varied between 80 and 610 mmHg and the temperature between 25 and 33 degrees C. The experiment was performed by placing a speaker, microphone and a heater in a desiccator equipped with a pressure gauge. After stabilizing the temperature by heating and the pressure by pumping out the air, we measured the sound intensity. The speaker was driven by a sine wave ranging between 1 and 2 kHz. Our results showed that the sound pressure increased linearly with the temperature when the air pressure was fixed. The sound pressure also increased linearly with the air density when the temperature was fixed. Analysis showed that at a given temperature the maximum change in the sound pressure was proportional to the air density, which agrees with our experimental results.
      • Low-cost Experiments in Optics & Material Science Using Candy Glass

      • PST1B08
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by William Heffner
      • Type: Poster
      • We present a collection of hands-on experiment and home-built apparatus designed to explore physics and "real" glass science through a common and accessible sugar glass also known as hard candy. Experiments are all low-cost and inter-related and include: synthesis, phase diagram, refractive index measurement, crystallization phenomena, and a fiber drawing tower, as well as differential thermal analysis and electrical conductivity apparatus. Most of the experiments can be assembled in a high school or college lab with minimal cost. The scientific content of these experiments progresses systematically, providing an environment to develop an understanding of glassy materials within a framework of active prolonged engagement.
      • Colorado Learning about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS)

      • PST1B10
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Heather Lewandowski
      • Type: Poster
      • The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS) is a short multiple-choice survey that assesses students' attitudes about conducting physics experiments in an instructional setting and in professional research. The survey is given at the beginning and at the end of a course, whereupon students are also asked about what helped to earn a good grade in the course. A variety of aspects of experimentation are explored, including students' sense-making, affect, self-confidence, and the value of collaboration. Over 4000 E-CLASS responses have been gathered from over 30 courses at 17 colleges and universities. We will present a broad overview of our findings, including which student views are the least expert-like, which views shift most over the course of a semester, and which have largest differences between introductory and upper-division courses.
      • Mechanical NMR 2.0

      • PST1B12
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Mark Masters
      • Type: Poster
      • An updated version of the mechanical analog of NMR utilizing Cypress PSoC to drive the perturbing magnetic field. This magnetic field is either a fixed frequency sinusoid, a swept sinusoid, or a pulsed sinusoid.
      • Integrating Robotic Observatories into Introductory Astronomy Labs

      • PST1B14
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Gerald Ruch
      • Type: Poster
      • The University of St. Thomas (UST) and a consortium of five local schools are using the UST Robotic Observatory, housing a 17' telescope, to develop labs and image processing tools that allow easy integration of observational labs into existing introductory astronomy curriculum. Our lab design removes the burden of equipment ownership by sharing access to a common resource and removes the burden of data processing by automating processing tasks that are not relevant to the learning objectives. Each laboratory exercise takes place over two lab periods. During period one, students design and submit observation requests via the lab website. Between periods, the telescope automatically acquires the data and our image processing pipeline produces data ready for student analysis. During period two, the students retrieve their data from the website and perform the analysis. The first lab, "Weighing Jupiter," was successfully implemented at UST and several of our partner schools.
      • MOOCs in the Physics Lab? Reports from the Front

      • PST1B16
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Sean Robinson
      • Type: Poster
      • We report on progress, challenges, and lessons learned in the first semester (fall 2013) of using the edX software platform --- principally targeted at delivering so-called massive open online courses (MOOCs) --- to deliver parts of a residential physics advanced lab course at MIT which is neither massive, open, nor predominantly online. The MOOC tools were used to enable "flipped classroom" methods for teaching data analysis and basic equipment usage: content delivery was shifted to online preparatory exercises and video lectures, freeing up lab time for active learning exercises, group discussion, and student-teacher dialog. MOOC tools were also used to deliver preparatory background material which students were required to complete before starting each new experiment.
  • Physics Education Research Posters

      • Clarifying the Force Concept Inventory via Think-Aloud Interviews

      • PST1C02
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Matthew Semak
      • Type: Poster
      • Over the past two years we have conducted three iterations of think-aloud interviews with students as they grappled with questions on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI). Doing so has shown us that the difficulties they have with some questions have nothing to do with their understanding of physics. These difficulties involve diagrams, notations, and vocabulary that make perfect sense to physics teachers but can easily confuse beginning students. Informed by those think-aloud interviews, we have been modifying a subset of questions to improve clarity and then administered each version of the clarified FCI to students in two introductory physics courses. Here we show how and why we modified a few specific questions to construct our latest version of the clarified FCI and compare the consequent results with several years of archival data generated with the canonical Inventory.
      • Representational and Writing Style Influences on Concept Inventories

      • PST1C04
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Michi Ishimoto
      • Type: Poster
      • The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE) probe not only Newtonian responses but also commonsense concepts of force and motion. The representation and writing styles of questions may influence students' responses. Presumably, these influences are greater on responses to questions concerning commonsense concepts. Four items regarding Newton's 3rd law on the FCI and the FMCE are identical in terms of their contents. A comparison of representational styles reveals that three of the four questions are different and that one question is identical. Different writing styles are used to translate the FCI and the FMCE into Japanese. Representational and writing style influences on the responses to the four questions are statistically examined using data from the same groups of students. The FMCE produces results with fewer correct answers and more common-sense answers. A greater difference is observed on questions with different representational styles.
      • Students' Blending of Mathematical Integrals with Physics

      • PST1C08
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Dehui Hu
      • Type: Poster
      • College calculus is used across many physics topics from introductory to upper-division level courses. The fundamental concepts of differentiation and integration are important tools for solving real-world problems involving non-uniformly distributed quantities. Research in physics education has reported students' lack of ability to transfer their calculus knowledge to physics. In order to better understand students' deficiencies, we collected data from group teaching/learning interviews as students solved physics problems requiring setting up integrals. We adapted the conceptual blending framework from cognitive science to make sense of the ways in which students combined their knowledge from calculus and physics to set up integrals. We report on our analysis of the ways in which students blend knowledge in several mental spaces to set up integrals in physics contexts. Finally, we compare students' conceptual blends and discuss the implications of our study
      • Effect of Visual Cueing on Students' Eye Movements and Reasoning*

      • PST1C10
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Amy Rouinfar**
      • Type: Poster
      • Visual cues overlaid on diagrams and animations can help students attend to the relevant areas and facilitate problem solving. In this study we investigate the effect of visual cues on students' eye movements as they solve conceptual physics problems. Students (N=90) enrolled in an introductory physics course were individually interviewed. During each interview students worked through four sets of problems containing a diagram while their eye movements were recorded. The diagrams contained features relevant to solving the problem correctly and separate areas related to common incorrect responses documented in the literature. Each problem set contained an initial problem, six isomorphic training problems, and a transfer problem. Those in the cued condition saw visual cues overlaid on the training problems. Students provided their responses verbally. We discuss the influence of visual cueing on students' attention and reasoning.
  • Pre-college/Informal and Outreach Posters

      • Bridging Theory to Practice: Student Model of Greenhouse Effects in a Ninth Grade Classroom

      • PST1D02
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Nicole Strickhouser
      • Type: Poster
      • Studies have shown that secondary students have difficulty in understanding greenhouse effect (GHE). Students tend to view greenhouse gases forming a lid on the Earth preventing the "heat" from escaping. It is understandable because classroom experiments often use a model of greenhouse rather than that of GHE. We used Keating's (2007) suggestions to develop a model of GHE. We found that the ninth grade students in a school, with a large proportion of students from non-dominant groups (NGSS, 2013), were able to construct the GHE model based on the data they collected. Their performance on the post-test also showed that they could compare models of the Earth's atmosphere with or without the greenhouse gases and support their claims with appropriate evidence.
      • Student Models of Weather, Climate, and Climate Change

      • PST1D04
      • Mon 01/06, 8:45AM - 9:30AM
      • by Jignesh Mehta
      • Type: Poster
      • Climate change is an important challenge of out time but public understanding of it is limited at best. Newly released Next Generation Science Standards (2013) suggests that climate change be taught from the middle school level onwards. We think that teaching of this complex topic needs to begin with what students know about weather, climate, climate change, and global warming. This exploration of student understanding needs to be done at the level where climate change education is expected to begin. To meet this need, we explored middle school students? responses to open-ended questions and constructed student models of these concepts. These models have implications for curriculum development and instruction at the secondary (7-12) grades.
  • Lecture/Classroom Posters

      • Whiteboarding in Conceptual Physics: Evidence From a First Year Experience*

      • PST2E01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Bradley Gearhart
      • Type: Poster
      • During the 2012-2013 school year, Riverside High School, a persistently low achieving school in the Buffalo Public School District (Buffalo, NY), launched their first offering of Conceptual Physics to support the a new Health Science Academy within the school. Two teachers integrated whiteboarding into three sections of Conceptual Physics. Despite chronic absenteeism, high levels of initial student apathy, a preponderance of ESL students, and extraordinarily diverse student demographics, whiteboards demonstrated profound levels of student thinking and highly varied interpretations of shared evidence not typically associated with students in low performing urban schools. Evidence gathered from student whiteboards demonstrated cognitive interaction beyond that typically reflected on high stakes standardized testing for this student population.
      • The Academic Equity and Ethics Survey

      • PST2E03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Frances Mateycik
      • Type: Poster
      • As a result of witnessing open disregard to the academic honor code every semester, I was determined to find out why these few students felt it was appropriate to cheat on individual assessments. Through general discussion it was clear that these students never intended on hiding their actions, but rather, defended their cheating using their own resolved code of academic conduct. These students felt that it was their right as learners to provide themselves with the best education, and if they were learning something new while discussing an examination problem, then it was not a dishonorable act. Discussion with these students were used to draft an "academic equity and ethics" survey. The survey was presented to my physics students at the start of every semester, for three consecutive semesters, totaling approximately 200 students. This poster will present the survey questions posed, and the trends in answers given on the survey.
      • Responsive Teaching: A Practitioner's View

      • PST2E05
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Sharon Fargason
      • Type: Poster
      • Responsive teaching offers students the opportunity to learn science in the spirit of the discipline itself. Students work together to explain, question, model, test, and evaluate their own ideas, rather than follow a prescribed set of directions or recipes for experiments. The curriculum evolves on the basis of the ideas that students bring up, and the role of the teacher is to recognize, draw out, and build on the nascent scientific ideas that students offer. Data from my third grade classroom will highlight what responsive teaching is, how teacher pedagogy and planning are affected, and the ways that students develop skills and routines that are critical to the discipline of science.
  • Other Posters

      • Transforming Academia: Native American Women and Women in Physics

      • PST2D01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Carolina Ilie
      • Type: Poster
      • Though there are numerous initiatives to recruit and retain both Native American women into higher education, and women in general into the field of physics, rates of success are limited. Trying to improve percentages alone does not do enough to transform western institutions of higher learning into spaces of inclusivity for race and gender. The transformations that are taking place within academia to these ends come from women of diverse backgrounds themselves. This poster will give examples of initiatives meant to increase recruitment and retention of women in physics, as well as Native American women into academia in general. Alongside these important initiatives, this poster will demonstrate the ways women in physics are carving a home for themselves and shaping epistemologies and Native American women are 'Indigenizing the Academy.'
      • Changing the Climate in a Physics Department

      • PST2D03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Talat Rahman
      • Type: Poster
      • The physics department at the University of Central Florida in 2006 was nodifferent from most: emphasis on research and funding as vehicles to achieve excellence and international prominence. The stringent baccalaureate curriculum ensured that most (87%) majors aimed to go to PhD programs. Initial efforts by a faculty group led to the introduction of inquiry-based teaching in the algebra-based physics courses, in an active learning environment. Data collected on student learning gains in these courses were so convincingly in favor of the active learning environment, compared to the traditional lecture-lab-recitation mode, that funds were found to build a new SCALE-UP type collaborative classroom. To accommodate the large enrollment, a variant that coupled lecture format to mini-studios was recently introduced. Learning assistants added further to course reforms. Bi-weekly pedagogy seminars became focal points. The award of a PhysTEC and NSF-TUES grant further helped bring a large number of faculty together.
      • Summer Honors Camp Promotes STEM and Teaching

      • PST2D05
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Kimberly Shaw
      • Type: Poster
      • The Columbus Regional Academy of Future Teachers of STEM (CRAFT-STEM), a Phase I Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program combines internships, scholarships, and a summer STEM Honors Camp. The camp functions both as a recruiting tool to interest high school students in STEM fields and to interest university students in teaching. Rising high school juniors and seniors apply to attend the camp, which is staffed by Noyce interns and university personnel. All assemble for a two-week residential camp (supported by corporate donors) to engage in hands-on activities that nurture and develop interest in STEM areas, and learn about connections between classroom lessons, real world applications, and potential STEM-related careers. The camp's culminating experience includes a student colloquium in which participants present their own STEM research. This camp builds on a historically successful Future Teachers Academy hosted by CSU. Forms and assessment instruments available.
      • Optics for Life Sciences: A Microscopy-based Course

      • PST2D07
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Shauna Novobilsky
      • Type: Poster
      • Interactive learning strategies are frequently used in the teaching of introductory physics topics. Here we describe the development of a course for undergraduate students who are not majoring in the field of physics. By adapting the learning materials from a Studio Optics course and Optics for Biophysics course, we hope to create a course designed to bring interactive learning to the topic of optics. Adapting the course to fit our curriculum will require a reduction in the amount of mathematics in the course, but the majority of the course requirements from the courses mentioned above will remain. This will create an environment that integrates lectures, lab, and simple problem solving as well as a focus on a long-term project for the course. The hope is to create a course that is advantageous to non-physics majors who still have an interest in optics.
  • Physics Education Research Posters 2

      • Peer Evaluations of Video Lab Reports by Introductory Physics Students

      • PST2C01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Shih-Yin Lin
      • Type: Poster
      • Assessing student performance becomes challenging when course enrollment becomes very large (~10^5 students). As part of an introductory physics Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) offered by Georgia Institute of Technology, students submit video reports on force and motion labs. Peer evaluation of reports provides the primary method for evaluating student laboratory work. This paper describes the methods developed and used to guide students in evaluating each others' video lab reports when the course is offered in summer 2013 and fall 2013. Results of how students peer evaluation compares to experts evaluation will be presented.
      • Characterizing Students' Use of Models During Experimentation

      • PST2C03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Benjamin Zwickl
      • Type: Poster
      • Models are simplified and abstract representations of real-world phenomenathat are used for creating and communicating scientific explanations. In this study we analyze students' use of models in a 30-minute think-aloud lab activity involving basic electronic and optical components. The framework used for our fine-grained analysis of modeling during experimentation was developed independently in the context of curriculum development for upper-division physics laboratories. We review general patterns in students' use of models, describe our coding scheme, and conclude with a discussion of implications for the design of modeling-focused lab activities and lab-appropriate assessments.
      • Student Attitudes Toward and Perceptions of New Material in Physics

      • PST2C05
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Anne Tabor-Morris
      • Type: Poster
      • Learning new materials, especially physics topics, can be overwhelming to students. How do physics students approach and commit to learning new material? The Physics Education Research group at Georgian Court University presents a poster on their current research on student attitudes toward new material and strategies they employ. This includes research on types of materials and student commitment to learning that material.
      • Reducing the Gender Gap in College Physics

      • PST2C07
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Wendy Adams
      • Type: Poster
      • We have seen a reduction in the gender gap with a population of students who start with low pre-test scores on the FCI, 25% and 38%, and end with similar post=test scores of 65% and 73% for women and men respectively. The course design is highly interactive and uses College Physics, by Knight, Jones and Fields. One unique aspect of the course is our equivalent peer groups, which are matched by GPA and gender, and which work together in class and during recitation/lab. The lecture component uses Peer Instruction with colored cards, group problem solving and University of Maryland Tutorials in Physics Sense-Making. We have also redesigned the three-hour labs by splitting the time into two parts: recitation using the Knight et al. Workbooks followed by a short lab that is designed with student motivation as the primary goal.
  • Teacher Training and Enhancement Posters

      • ATE Workshop for Physics Faculty

      • PST2B01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Thomas O'Kuma
      • Type: Poster
      • The ATE Workshop for Physics Faculty project has started its fourth year and has finished its 16th workshop/conference. In this poster, we will display information about the project, information about these workshops/conferences, and information about future workshops/conferences. Information concerning development of laboratory activities will also be displayed. Supported in part by NSF DUE #1003633.
      • Using RTOP and Other Reformed Tools to Build and Strengthen My Teaching

      • PST2B03
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Griffin Harmon
      • Type: Poster
      • As a nontraditional teacher candidate, the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program has provided me with the opportunity to receive my masters in physics education at SUNY Buffalo State College. My involvement in physics education at Buffalo State has been an amazing experience. Often in the summer courses, when doing a specific activity or whiteboarding session, I realized how productive learning and intense was our learning. Similarly in my high school classroom, I have been engaging students and fostering an understanding of physics using reformed teaching. Being assessed with the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP), numerous occasions, has given me confidence and helped me improve my instruction. Previous assessments by school administrators focused on items, which had little impact on the learning going on in the classroom. The RTOP assessments have provided me with useful notes and have highlighted the areas I need to work on, while re-enforcing my good habits.
      • Supporting the Metamorphosis from Physics Student to Physics Teacher

      • PST2B05
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Mary Norris
      • Type: Poster
      • The Virginia Tech Physics Department and School of Education are in their third year of a collaboration with the Physics Teaching Education Coalition (PhysTEC) to increase the number of highly prepared physics teachers graduating from the university. Among the techniques employed to realize this goal are providing early field experiences for students, providing a course on physics-specific pedagogy, and providing financial support during the master's of education (MAEd) program through a physics graduate assistantship. In the past two years, six students have graduated from the program with their MAEd. All currently teach high school physics. All entered the classroom well prepared and excited to teach. What happened after they met their students and closed their doors? This study traces the evolution of these teachers' beliefs and practices during their first semester of teaching and the effect of both local and PhysTEC mentoring efforts.
      • Models and Perspectives of International Student Exchanges in Teacher Education

      • PST2B07
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Nina Glutsch
      • Type: Poster
      • We want to design a U.S.-German exchange program for STEM teacher preparation courses that implements a network of universities and their cooperating schools. Goals are to make STEM education a more attractive field of work, balance the supply and demand of qualified STEM teachers, and foster international research in the PER community. Students and teachers should be encouraged to study or work in the field of STEM education in both countries, thus opening paths to international careers in STEM teaching. The University of Cologne is about to develop different exchange programs with schools all over the world, e.g. the U.S., South Africa, Uganda, Europe, and Finland. At the poster, we want to discuss how a global network of schools and universities can transform teachers from "local activists" to "global players."
      • Helping Physics Teacher-Candidates Develop Questioning Skills through Innovative Technology Use

      • PST2B09
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Marina Milner-Bolotin
      • Type: Poster
      • Active learning pedagogies, such as Peer Instruction (PI), have been foundto be effective in undergraduate physics teaching. However, they are still rare in secondary schools and in physics teacher education programs. One of the reasons for that is physics teachers' lack of experience in asking effective conceptual STEM questions and underestimating their pedagogical value. Thus research-based multiple-choice conceptual questions in STEM teacher education are still underutilized. In this study Peer Instruction pedagogy was supplemented by the use of a collaborative online system -- PeerWise (PW) (peerwise.cs.auckland.ac.nz) to help teacher-candidates develop these skills. In addition, a special STEM resource of conceptual multiple-choice questions (http://scienceres-edcp-educ.sites.olt.ubc.ca/) was developed and used in STEM methods courses. We report on the effects of a research-based technology-enhanced physics methods course on teacher-candidates' content and pedagogical knowledge, on their attitudes about active learning, and on willingness and ability to implement active learning pedagogy during their practicum.
      • Demographics of Physics Teachers Using the Schools and Staffing Survey

      • PST2B11
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by David Rosengrant
      • Type: Poster
      • This project is part of a multidisciplinary team to study secondary physics teaching using the School and Staffing Survey (SASS) between 1987 and 2012. We will answer the following questions (and when applicable compare AIP survey results to): How many physics teachers are there in the United States? What are trends in the population growth compared to other teacher groups in the past 20 years? What proportion of those that teach physics do so as their main assignment? What other subjects do physics teachers teach? To what extent have physics teachers earned a physics degree at any level? What other backgrounds do these teachers have? What has been the certification status of physics teachers over time? To what extent has the racial and gender profile of physics teachers changed over time? To what extent have the age and years? of experience distributions change over time?
      • STEM Institutes for High School Teachers

      • PST2B15
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Jennifer Blue
      • Type: Poster
      • For three years, Sinclair Community College has run STEM Institutes for high school teachers out of their Courseview campus in Mason, OH. The teachers attend the Institute for two weeks in their first summer; in week one, they are pushed into considering inquiry-based pedagogy as they practice lessons in science, math, and engineering, and in week two, they write and present their own multi-day lessons. In the following school year, many of them participate in an iDiscovery online course (www.iDiscovery.org), in which they continue their discussions about active, inquiry-based teaching. In their second summer, they have a job shadowing program in which they are placed in local teach businesses and hospitals. Results of teacher surveys about the program will be shared, as well as an evaluation of the lesson modules the teachers created during the Institute. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DUE-1003048.
      • A Standard Model Poster for the Classroom

      • PST2B17
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15PM
      • by Cristina Brazzelli
      • Type: Poster
      • A Standard Model poster for the classroom is presented. This poster summarizes what we know today about the building blocks of matter and how they interact with the Higgs boson. On a single poster we have displayed the various components of matter: quarks, leptons, gauge bosons, along with Feynman diagrams to help explain various observed phenomena. Included on either side of the chart are examples of baryons and mesons.
  • Upper Division and Graduate Posters

      • Constructing a Multiple-Choice Assessment for Upper-Division Quantum Physics from an Open-Ended Tool

      • PST2A01
      • Mon 01/06, 8:30PM - 9:15AM
      • by Homeyra Sadaghiani
      • Type: Poster
      • As part of an ongoing investigation of students' learning in upper-division quantum mechanics, we needed a high-quality conceptual assessment instrument for comparing outcomes of different curricular approaches. The 14 item open-ended Quantum Mechanics Assessment Tool (QMAT) was previously developed for this purpose. However, open-ended tests require complex scoring rubrics, are difficult to score consistently, and demand substantial investment of faculty time to grade. Here, we present the process of converting open-ended questions to multiple-choice (MC) format. We highlight the construction of effective distractors and the use of student interviews to revise and validate questions and distractors. We examine other elements of the process, including results of a preliminary implementation of the MC assessment given at Cal Poly Pomona and CU Boulder. This test will likely go through more iterations and further statistical analyses of reliability and validity are pending upon collection of additional.
  • Lecture/Classroom Posters

      • Teaching Physics Using a Public Policy Framework

      • PST2E02
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Jennifer Perrella
      • Type: Poster
      • Incorporating topics of interest to the general public into a physics course can be a daunting challenge. Yet doing so successfully can not only increase understanding of physics concepts as they apply in everyday life, but also can serve as a way to engage students who historically struggle in STEM classes. With the nationwide shift to Common Core standards and a resulting emphasis on literacy and critical thinking in all disciplines, public policy issues act as a structure upon which to build a physics class that incorporates these changes. A variety of performance tasks centered on policy issues such as helmet laws, wind turbine designs, and radio frequency identification can be used to assess student understanding of both the concepts and calculations of a physics course. This approach also aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards.
      • Problem-solving Strategies and Tracker to Build Dynamical Models

      • PST2E04
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Norely Useche-Baron
      • Type: Poster
      • We use the problem-solving strategies proposed by Knight and others in their book "College Physics", to give the tools that students need to build dynamical models in a video analysis tool, in this case Tracker. Taking into consideration different situations, we develop a workshop series that allows the students build the free-diagram body. Through this diagram, they can build dynamical models that can be used in Tracker to run a simulation, and compare the latter with a situation showed in video.
  • Other Posters

      • Transfering From Red Rocks to Mines

      • PST2D02
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Todd Ruskell
      • Type: Poster
      • Red Rocks Community College (RRCC) and Colorado School of Mines (CSM) havebenefited from a formal transfer agreement for about 15 years.  Roughly 30% of all students transferring to CSM originate at RRCC. We will discuss the steps we take to maintain the agreement, which include faculty-to-faculty meetings and recruiting events attended by CSM staff and faculty at RRCC. We will also discuss the academic arrangements that result in a nearly seamless student transition from RRCC to CSM, regardless of when students transfer. The agreement ensures a large enrollment in physics courses at RRCC, to the point that RRCC should be able to add a modern physics course to their offerings in the near future. In addition, CSM is ensured that transfer students have a solid math and science background, including their understanding of physics.
      • Group-Meeting with Undergraduates

      • PST2D04
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Yongkang Le
      • Type: Poster
      • Group-meetings were organized weekly as a support of the supervision of undergraduate training projects. About 20 undergraduates from different grades attend regularly. The topics of the group-meeting cover reports on project progress, introduction on related techniques, discussion on teaching labs, sharing of literature reading, etc. Besides the discussion during each meeting, group members are encouraged to write short notes and comments on a wiki-based website. Evidence of positive impacts of this group meeting on students' development exists in several aspects.
      • Incorporating Job Search Activities into a Modern Physics Class

      • PST2D06
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Jane Flood
      • Type: Poster
      • As part of its Career Pathways Project, the American Institute of Physics found that physics departments that were particularly successful at placing their students in jobs also had a good relationship with their career services office. In one department identified as successful, University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire, the department incorporated career center activities into majors' seminars. We present a series of job-search activities incorporated into a modern physics class along with assessment results on some of the associated assignments.
      • Acoustics and Fluid Dynamics of a Helmholtz Resonator

      • PST2D08
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Maxwell Henry
      • Type: Poster
      • NASA's Langley Research Center developed the software package OVERFLOW to solve the time dependent, Reynolds averaged, Navier-Stokes equation using multiple overset structured grids. The accuracy of the algorithm used in OVERFLOW permits the study of acoustics better than commercial software. To test the accuracy of acoustic prediction of OVERFLOW, the acoustic data from NASA scientist Patricia Block's cavity research[1] will be compared to 2 and 3 dimensional models. This project will focus on simulating 2 and 3-dimensional computational models of the Helmholtz Resonator and comparing it to not only published data but also my own experimental data. [2]
  • Physics Education Research Posters 2

      • Video Resource for Professional Development of University Physics Educators

      • PST2C02
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Rachel Scherr
      • Type: Poster
      • The Video Resource for Professional Development of University Physics Educators is being developed to support a wide range of university physics educators (four-year university faculty, two-year-college faculty, graduate teaching assistants, and undergraduate learning assistants) in engaging with key issues in teaching and learning. Based on compelling classroom video of best-practices university physics instruction, the resource is organized into "video workshops" that each introduce a significant topic in the teaching and learning of physics, such as formative assessment or cooperative learning. The topic is introduced through a captioned video episode of introductory physics students in the classroom, chosen to prompt collaborative discussion. Discussion questions prompt participants who view the episode to reflect on their pedagogical beliefs and on their own practice. The Video Resource will provide materials to be incorporated into a variety of professional development situations, including self-organized groups of professors, graduate TA training, LA pedagogy courses, and online professional development communities.
      • Movie Physics in Introductory Courses

      • PST2C04
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Natalia Schkolnikov
      • Type: Poster
      • Students from underrepresented groups in science and engineering often feel disconnected from physics. To make Hampton University students more interested in physics and to assess their critical thinking and scientific reasoning skills, we offer in introductory physics classes presentation topics related to our favorite sci-fi blockbuster epics. Each student is assigned the task of presenting a detailed analysis of one basic scientific assumption in a popular sci-fi movie. For example students analyze artificial gravity in Armageddon, disappearance of the Earth's magnetic field in The Core, and traveling to the center of the Earth in Journey to the Center of the Earth. The students enhance their learning through these presentations since they are required to explain the relations between physical laws and the movie's hypothesis and make a judgment whether it is a bad or good physics movie. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF HRD?1137747).
      • The Importance of Undergraduate Research: A SUNY Oswego Approach

      • PST2C06
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Carolina Ilie
      • Type: Poster
      • Undergraduate research is a valuable educational tool for students pursuing a degree in physics, but these experiences can become problematic and ineffective if not handled properly. This responsibility demands strength and commitment, as undergraduate research should be planned as an immersive learning experience in which the student has the opportunity to develop one's skills in accordance with one's interests. Effective undergraduate research experiences are marked by clear, measurable objectives and frequent student-professor collaboration. These objectives should reflect the long and short-term goals of the individual undergraduates, with a heightened focus on developing research skills for future use, as well as building a strong resume. With SUNY Oswego's mission to encourage our students to be involved in scholarly and creative activity as early as freshmen year, we present the campus opportunities for a successful undergraduate research experience.
  • Teacher Training and Enhancement Posters

      • Characterizing Noyce Scholars' Classrooms with RTOP

      • PST2B02
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Kathleen Falconer
      • Type: Poster
      • In 2009, we proposed a renewal and extension of the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program at Buffalo State College to support an additional 35 scholars seeking initial science and mathematics teacher certification over the next five years. As a component of the Phase 2 Teacher Scholarships Project at Buffalo State College: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Teacher Effectiveness Study, we included research and evaluation of the Noyce participants. Several Noyce scholars, in their first few years of teaching, have been observed and evaluated using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP). We will be reporting on the results from several classrooms.
      • Undergraduate Pathway to Teaching Physics at Georgia State University

      • PST2B04
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Brian Thoms
      • Type: Poster
      • The Department of Physics & Astronomy at Georgia State University has begun an effort to increase the quantity and quality of high school physics teachers with an emphasis on increasing recruitment into teaching of students from under-represented groups. GSU is a large, growing, urban, research university with a diverse student body. Recently a teacher certification pathway within our BS in Physics program has been added to the existing master's level program. As a new PhysTEC comprehensive site, our efforts include new recruiting, mentoring, and induction strategies, reform of introductory, calculus-based physics courses, and the addition of a teacher-on-residence. We will describe the recruiting and mentoring efforts and early success of the new undergraduate path to certification which is projected to produce four physics teachers in 2013-2014 and five in 2014-2015.
      • SUNY Buffalo State Summer Physics Teachers' Academy: The First Decade

      • PST2B06
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Alyssa Cederman
      • Type: Poster
      • The SUNY Buffalo State Summer Physics Teachers' Academy, partially modeledafter the Arizona State University Summer Modeling workshops, has run since summer 2002, serving more than 400 individual teachers seeking NYSED physics certification, including over 100 M.S.Ed. (Physics) degree graduates and candidates from the Buffalo State Physics Department. Each summer between two and five graduate credit teacher workshop courses have been offered, serving as many as 30 students per class. We share demographic data, insights, and experiences from the first decade of our summer academy, including recommendations and pitfalls for others interested in creating summer academies for physics teachers.
      • Merging Engineering Design, Technology and Physics for K-12 Teachers

      • PST2B08
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Dan MacIsaac
      • Type: Poster
      • We describe efforts of the Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Partnership (ISEP), a $10M NSF Math Science Partnership supported project involving SUNY at Buffalo (UB), Buffalo Public Schools, Buffalo State College, the Buffalo Museum of Science, PraxAir Corp and other partnering education institutions and corporate partners. This poster focuses on the creation of specific courses combining Engineering Design, Technology and Physics content addressing NGSS standards for K-12 teachers. These courses are offered as part of the SUNY Buffalo State Summer Physics Teachers' Academy.
      • Mathematics and Science Teaching and Learning Through Technology

      • PST2B10
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Heather Fisher
      • Type: Poster
      • Inquiry-based mathematics and science teaching depends on the teacher's ability to help students learn how to think independently and how to ask meaningful mathematics and science questions. The ability to ask questions that promote student learning is underpinned by the teacher's deep knowledge of the content, awareness of how this content can be taught, and their decisions about how to bring information into the classroom, which in today's classroom includes decisions about technology. Research conducted over the last decade has shown the development of TPCK is a slow and often painful process, making it especially important to address in teacher education programs. One way of addressing this challenge is engaging teachers in designing materials that integrate educational technologies during their teacher education and their formative teaching years. The goals of this study were to (a) implement the Mathematics and Science Teaching and Learning Through Technology (MSTLTT) resource, which uses conceptual questions that were developed using current educational research, into a secondary physics methods course in a teacher education program. Furthermore, we aimed to (b) model active engagement with educational technologies in a physics methods course; (c) explore clickers as a mechanism for active engagement; and (d) examine if and how teacher-candidates' epistemological views were impacted through active engagement with technology-enhanced pedagogy.
      • Developing Master Physics Teacher Leaders

      • PST2B12
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Greg Rushton
      • Type: Poster
      • This project is a five-year NSF-funded project to take area physics (and chemistry) teachers who are excelling in the classroom and to help transition them into Master Teachers. We define a Master Teacher as someone who moves from being a consumer of education resources to a producer or resource for others. We have a total of eight physics and eight chemistry teachers participating in this project who are resources at their school. However, our goal is to transform these teachers into resources at a county, state or national level. For this presentation, we will showcase our professional development model (currently in second year), participants, calendar, goals and benefits to the teachers. Furthermore, this presentation will highlight the journey and lessons learned from the education faculty involved in this project. For further information, please visit our website: http://www.ganoycescholars.org/
      • Learning Assistant (LA) Program: A Passage for High School Teacher Education and Recruitment

      • PST2B13
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM -
      • by Homeyra Sadaghiani
      • Type: Poster
      • Learning Assistant (LA) program is a mechanism for recruiting and preparing physics majors for careers in teaching. Learning Assistants (LAs) are talented undergraduates who work with faculty members to make courses more collaborative, student-centered, and interactive. Learning Assistant program provides potential future teachers with strongly supported and low-stress early teaching experiences that can encourage them to pursue teaching certification. In the process, faculty use LAs to promote interaction and collaboration among students enrolled in the course, which consequently improves the quality undergraduate physics programs. We will report on our challenges and achievements.
      • Online Physics Problem Solving Frameworks: High School and University-level Implementation

      • PST2B14
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Andrew Mason
      • Type: Poster
      • At the University of Central Arkansas we are currently investigating implementations of computer coaches developed at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities for calculus-based physics. The modules are designed to use cognitive apprenticeships to coach the decision-making process required to develop a problem-solving framework. As such, there exists a potential to apply the modules towards additional learning environments, e.g. a pre-college environment. We describe the considerations needed in implementation between that of a university-level physics course and a high school physics classroom. A sampling of local area high school physics teachers teaching different levels of physics were surveyed during the summer and fall of 2013 about the utility of algebra-based coaching modules in their classroom, as well as for teacher-training purposes. We categorize their statements and compare to the prescribed use of the original calculus-based modules for an introductory university-level course.
      • High Altitude Balloon Missions

      • PST2B16
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Joel Berlinghieri
      • Type: Poster
      • Weather balloons can be used to raise small instrument packages to high altitudes. The instruments flown on these balloons can be used to measure atmospheric properties (temperature, pressure, etc.), measure radiation (cosmic rays, light scattering, etc.), and record stunning pictures (Earth, its curvature, etc.) among other flight projects. With a grant from Google and support from our STEM Center we are establishing a program that involves high school teachers and their students. High school teams propose, design, and build instrument packages which, with the help of our faculty and physics undergraduates, are launched, tracked, recovered, and analyzed by these teams.
  • Upper Division and Graduate Posters

      • Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper: Lorentz-Invariant Calculations with Causal Diamonds

      • PST2A02
      • Mon 01/06, 9:15PM - 10:00PM
      • by Roberto Salgado
      • Type: Poster
      • We extend our earlier work (Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper, arXiv:1111.7254) by visualizing Lorentz-invariant calculations associated with the Causal Diamonds between pairs of events, rather than observer-dependent calculations with light-clock diamonds associated with a given inertial observer. In our approach, we use spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. Quantitative results can be read off the diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra.
  • Post Deadline Posters

      • Meeting Common Core Standards in an Inquiry-based Physics Classroom

      • PST3A01
      • Tue 01/07, 3:00PM - 3:45PM
      • by Andrew Marth
      • Type: Poster
      • Today's curriculum is currently driven by the common core standards which have been adopted in most states. However, because the standards focus on reading and writing, it can be intimidating to try to implement them in an inquiry-based physics classroom. With the push towards discovery learning in science education, the goals of meeting the needs of students and applying common core standards, all while maintaining a student-centered classroom is challenging but not impossible. By introducing varied reading strategies to the standard physics curriculum, classroom teachers can successfully enhance students' reading skills while continuing to incorporate inquiry based teaching. This poster focuses on the study and implementation of successful reading and writing strategies that simultaneously meet core standards and enhance physics instruction.
      • Investigation of Bernoulli's Equation in the Undergraduate Laboratory

      • PST3A03
      • Tue 01/07, 3:00PM - 3:45PM
      • by Patrick Polley
      • Type: Poster
      • Bernoulli's Equation is a statement of the conservation of energy for the flow of an incompressible fluid. In our work we apply Bernoulli's Equation to analyze the flow of water through a horizontal pipe attached to a two-liter bottle that acts as a reservoir. We expand our analysis by examining the loss of kinetic energy that results from viscosity for different diameters and lengths of pipe. We present our work in the format of a laboratory exercise that requires minimal equipment and can be performed in the introductory physics laboratory
      • SN 2009nr Image Reduction & Analysis

      • PST3A05
      • Tue 01/07, 3:00PM - 3:45PM
      • by Jonathan Heath
      • Type: Poster
      • A type Ia supernova (SN Ia) is a white dwarf (WD) [a dense, electron-degenerate vestige of a star] that has appropriated enough mass from a neighboring star that the total mass of the WD reaches a critical point. The star quickly approaches its mass limit (Chandrasekhar limit) until the overall heat and pressure results in a thermonuclear explosion. A plot of this object's brightness over time is known as a light curve. Because of the uniformity of their light curves, SNe Ia are valuable markers for determining the expansion of the universe and other cosmological parameters. Understanding the properties of these supernovae is vital in order to build our confidence in their use as standard candles. A small, but increasing number of SN Ia late-time observations have been made in the near-infrared (NIR). Most exhibit a flattening of the NIR power even as the visible light declines at a steady rate. It is still unclear as to why they exhibit this behavior and how typical this is. In order to characterize the late behavior of SNe Ia, images of the supernova 2009nr were analyzed using the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF). NIR (J, H, K) images were taken with the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National-Observatory using the FLAMINGOS IR Imaging Spectrometer while optical (B, V, R, I) images used the Mosaic 1 imager. The supernova?s apparent magnitude for each night of observation (by filter) was found by using reference stars. We present preliminary light curves of the supernova 2009nr and a comparison to another SN Ia observed at similar epochs.
      • Using Interdisciplinary Projects in General Physics Courses

      • PST3A07
      • Tue 01/07, 3:00PM - 3:45PM
      • by Mojgan Haghanikar
      • Type: Poster
      • To promote transfer of learning, the introductory physics students at several universities were encouraged to get involved in projects that were about application of physics concepts to their major of study. We were seeking to improve students' understanding of physics concepts by enhancing their empirical understanding and facilitating the visualization of abstract concepts. Thinking across disciplines informed students about many applications of physics and improved students' beliefs about relevancy of physics. In addition, integrating several perspectives and learning approaches provided more accessibility in physics. We encouraged group presentations, and students who contributed to the projects were rewarded based on their efforts. At the end of presentation day, students were introduced to many applications of physics through their own research and listening to the research of their peers. Among the example topics were muscle activities and action potentials, electrophoresis of DNA, Micelle formations, polarization angle of carbon fibers in electric fields, RNA replications and electrostatic forces, using center of mass in architecture to prevent earthquake destruction and using fiber optic in architecture lightening design. In this poster we present a few examples of the students' findings.
      • Physics Labs with Flavor: Error Analysis.

      • PST3A09
      • Tue 01/07, 3:00PM - 4:30PM
      • by Mikhail Agrest
      • Type: Poster
      • In Theory, there should be no contradiction between Theory and Practice, but in Practice there always is. Error Analysis is an integral element of any experimental study, and the importance of its teaching in introductory labs is indefeasible. Error Analysis becomes an integral part of students' world outlook. It is used for evaluation of students' performance in the Introductory Physics Labs taught by the recurrent method, also known as Physics Labs with Flavor method [1-5]. This presentation is dedicated to the consideration of ways to make Error Analysis be independent of formulation of the problem. It must not depend on the frame of reference. Traditionally used, Percent Error Formula relates The Deviation of the results to the Accepted Value. It is suggested that The Deviation of the predicted result is related rather to a Characteristic Measure. This would make the evaluation independent of the frame of reference.
      • "Flipping The Classroom" Learning Method Applied to Introductory Physics-I Classroom: Initial Findings

      • PST3A11
      • Tue 01/07, 3:00PM - 3:45PM
      • by Sairam Tangirala
      • Type: Poster
      • In flipping the classroom teaching-method, students are encouraged to study the material prior to attending the class. The learning is then reinforced in the classroom through a combination of lecture, group learning, demonstrations, and active learning exercises involving peers. In this poster, we briefly explore the effectiveness of traditional classroom lectures, our current teaching method, student attitudes, and our initial findings.
      • Conducting Fundamental Experiments with UV Light for Destroying Viruses

      • PST3A13
      • Tue 01/07, 3:00PM - 3:45PM
      • by Joseph Ametepe
      • Type: Poster
      • This undergraduate interdisciplinary project involved the studying and conducting fundamental experiments in using UV light sources for killing bacteria and viruses. The project was established as part of Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC), School of Science and Technology's STEM initiative of engaging every STEM student in undergraduate research. Faculty from Physics and biology at GGC actively engaged and monitored students in the basic research process of studying the basic discharge mechanism of UV light sources, their interaction with biological agents, growing microbial cultures, conducting UV exposure experiments, data collection and analysis, and report writing. An extension of the project is develop a research protocol in using UV light sources in treating drinking water.
      • Inexpensive Nuclear Coincidence Experiments

      • PST3A02
      • Tue 01/07, 3:45PM - 4:30PM
      • by Patrick Polley
      • Type: Poster
      • We describe a set of experiments involving nuclear coincidence events thatwe carried out using inexpensive filters, preamplifiers, and analog-to-digital convertors that we added to old Geiger counters. This additional circuitry allows us to monitor events that occur in conjunction with other nuclear events. We present the results of our results for cosmic-ray detection and nuclear decays in 22Na and 137Cs, along with our circuit designs that can be used to refurbish older Geiger counters.
      • Teacher and Student Ideas on Electronics Laboratories

      • PST3A04
      • Tue 01/07, 3:45PM - 4:30PM
      • by Pieter Coppens
      • Type: Poster
      • Although a significant amount of time is dedicated to lab work in a typical engineering curriculum, the aim of it is not always clear. Therefore, we constructed a survey about laboratory goals that was filled in by over 300 students and teachers of a 2nd-year electronics course at four Belgian university colleges. Results show a difference between teachers' and students' expectations about laboratories, as well as a remarkable agreement between colleges. This poster will present the data along with an analysis and discussion.
      • Investigation into How to Evaluate Students' Lab Work

      • PST3A06
      • Tue 01/07, 3:45PM - 4:30PM
      • by Dan Liu
      • Type: Poster
      • Whether group lab report assignments can engage students more than individual lab report assignments? Do you give students a final exam in lab sessions? What percentage of the final test should be given? A pool of 90 undergraduate students in five different lab sessions at the University of New Haven completed the survey of their preference. They are from freshman to junior, with different majors. The result of the investigation provides a reference for lab lecturers to set syllabus and rubrics.
      • Outcome of Learning Physics with Mathematics

      • PST3A08
      • Tue 01/07, 3:45PM - 4:30PM
      • by Sunil Dehipawala
      • Type: Poster
      • Obtaining a complete understanding of college physics principles and concepts and solving simple problems require strong skills in Algebra and some Trigonometry. However, many students struggle with algebra-based introductory physics courses despite completing college algebra before taking physics. We investigated the potential benefits that could be acquired by teaching physics together with mathematics, focusing on algebraic concepts relevant to problem solving in physics. Two sections of a physics course were utilized in this study. One section had a regular physics lecture that introduced concepts and used examples to demonstrate how to solve simple problems. The investigation section was given a 5-10 minute algebra review before the physics lecture. Both sections contained the same amount of new material everyday. Upon review of class quizzes and exams, it appears that reviewing algebra concepts at the beginning of a physics class helped better students' performance.
      • Assessment of Physics by Inquiry Programs for K-12 Teachers*

      • PST3A10
      • Tue 01/07, 3:45PM - 4:30PM
      • by Robert Endorf
      • Type: Poster
      • We describe our most recent results from the continuing assessment of the effectiveness of our Physics by Inquiry[1] professional development programs for K-12 teachers at the University of Cincinnati. This study is based on data obtained from more than 500 teachers who have completed either a 13 quarter-credit-hour graduate course in Physics by Inquiry for teachers in grades 5-12 or a 7 quarter-credit-hour course for teachers in grades K-5. Our data demonstrate that the programs have been effective in increasing the teachers' science content knowledge and their understanding of scientific inquiry. The teachers have also exhibited a significant increase in their self-confidence in designing and teaching inquiry-based science lessons. A large majority of the teachers in the program reported that the quality of their students' work had noticeably improved after implementing inquiry-based science activities in their classrooms.
      • Designing, Developing, and Building High-powered UV Light for Killing Bacteria

      • PST3A12
      • Tue 01/07, 3:45PM - 4:30PM
      • by Joseph Ametepe
      • Type: Poster
      • In an interdisciplinary project that engaged students in the basic research process of designing and developing prototypes of UV light sources using microwave energy, students experimented with different gas mixtures to determine the best combination of gases that emits around the 254 nm wavelength. Research students, apart from building microwave driven system from component parts, studied (i) the basic engineering of the microwave lamp system, (ii) fundamental science underlying the discharge process, (iii) evaluate the technical benefits of the system over other existing technologies, and conducted (iv) feasibility studies of the system for various practical applications such as destroying viruses and bacteria.
 

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