AAPT Summer Meeting 2020 in Grand Rapids, MI

2020 Summer Meeting Workshops

Listed below is a current list of workshops planned for the 2020 Summer Meeting. It is recommended that you register early for your workshop(s). Some workshops will fill-up early and others may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Some details are subject to change.

CEU Hours

Earn CEU hours for attending one of the AAPT workshops.  Earn 0.40 hours for a 1/2 day workshop or 0.80 for a full day workshop.

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  • W01: Learn Physics While Practicing Science: Introduction to ISLE

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    David Brookes

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Matthew Blackman, Yuhfen Lin, Yuehai Yang

    Cost

    • Members: $95
    • Non-members: $110

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    Participants will learn how to modify introductory physics courses at any level to help students acquire a good conceptual foundation, apply this knowledge in problem solving, and engage them in science practices. The framework for these modifications is Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE). We provide tested curriculum materials including: (a) The second edition of College Physics Textbook by Etkina, Planinsic and Van Heuvelen, the Physics Active Learning Guide and the Instructor Guide; (b) a website with over 200 videotaped experiments and questions for use in the classroom, laboratories, and homework; (c) a set of innovative labs in which students design their own experiments, and (d) newly developed curriculum materials that use LEDs to help students learn physics. During the workshop the participants will learn how to use the materials in in college and high school physics courses to help their students learn physics by practicing it. We will focus on the connections of our materials with the NGSS and revised AP curriculum, specifically on the interplay of science practices and crosscutting concepts. *Please bring your own laptop to the workshop if you own one. If you do not own a computer, you will be paired with somebody who does.

    W02: Introductory Physics Labs for Quantum Sciences

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kenn Lonnquist

    Cost

    • Members: $72
    • Non-members: $97

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Whether your lab curriculum is ripe for an overhaul, well-established, or you are simply looking for exciting and innovative activities for the classroom, this workshop will provide new ideas to bring home to your institution. Presenters from colleges and universities across the United States will each demonstrate their approach to a favorite introductory lab exercise or two, and you will be provided with details on how to preform additional experiments. This year's workshop will focus on labs for Quantum Mechanics and related subjects. Attendees will have the opportunity to work with each instructor and their apparatus, and will have an opportunity to browse the equipment freely. Links to documentation will be provided for each experiment, with lab manuals, sample data, equipment lists, and construction or purchase information. This workshop is appropriate primarily for college and university instructional laboratory developers, but instructors in all levels are welcome.

    W03: Introduction to PC Board Design and Manufacturing

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Paul Noel

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Stephen Irons

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 12
    • Available: 12

    Electronic devices can serve many useful purposes within a physics class or lab. They can be used for demonstrations, as part of a laboratory experiment, or serve as a student project. While electronic devices can be assembled on a solderless breadboard or soldered using generic perf board, it is surprisingly easy, and frequently the most inexpensive option to create a more permanent and electrically robust device by designing and ordering a custom printed circuit board (PCB). In this workshop you will learn how to design and manufacture a PCB for instructional uses. We will discuss and use several design options, including the free software EagleCAD and KiCad. Participants will be guided in how to create a schematic, select components, arrange the parts on a circuit board, and route the circuit. We will guide the participant through this process from beginning to end. They will also learn how to create the set of PCB manufacturing files (Gerber files), and the factors one should consider in choosing the particular manufacturer. Each participant will receive a completed PCB along with the design files to take home. Participants may bring their own circuit to convert to PCB or we can supply one for them.

    W04: Integrating Computation at TYCs with PICUP

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dwain Desbien

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Gloria Ramos

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    This workshop will focus on integrating computation into the courses taught at Two-Year Colleges (introductory algebra and calculus based courses). We will learn some coding using glowscript, talk about appropriate times for computation in curriculum, and what kinds of problems make for good computational work. Additionally we talk about how the PICUP site and program can help. Participants will need to bring their own laptop.

    W05: Astronomy Research Seminar

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Rachel Freed

    Cost

    • Members: $135
    • Non-members: $160

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 25

    Participants will learn how to conduct an Astronomy Research Seminar, including how to use online tools to select a project, how to use the Las Cumbres Observatory and Skynet Telescope Networks to collect data, and the analysis software and methods. This will be a hands-on workshop, where each participant will use their own computer to go through the whole process. There will also be a discussion of the process whereby students are taught how to write for scientific publication. After the workshop, online support will be provided to help participants start their own Astronomy Research Seminar with the end goal being to have students submit their own research papers for publication.

    W06: PIRA Workshop: Lecture Demonstrations I & II Condensed: Selections from the PIRA 200

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dale Stille

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Sam Sampere

    Cost

    • Members: $95
    • Non-members: $120

    Seats

    • Max: 50
    • Available: 50

    PIRA Lecture Demonstrations I & II Condensed During this ½ day workshop, we will introduce you to the Physics Resource Instructional Association (PIRA) and the PIRA 200. Almost every demonstration one can think of has a catalog number within the Demonstration Classification System (DCS); we will introduce you to this system and the comprehensive bibliography that details journal articles and demonstration manuals for construction and use in the classroom. The PIRA 200 are the specific 200 most important and necessary demonstrations needed to teach an introductory physics course. We will also show a subset of approximately 50 demonstrations explaining use, construction, acquisition of materials, and answer any questions in this highly interactive and dynamic environment. Ideas for organizing and building your demonstration collection will be presented. We especially invite faculty members teaching introductory physics to attend. NOTE that this is a paperless workshop. All information and materials will be distributed on a USB thumb drive. A computer, tablet, or other device capable of reading a USB will be needed for note taking, or you can bring your own paper.

    W07: Fun and Engaging Labs

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Wendy K. Adams

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Duane Merrell

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    In this workshop we will share many labs that are suitable for both high school and introductory college physics. The labs are challenging but not too difficult and, leave plenty of room for creativity! We have found success by limiting the goals for the labs to: 1. Fun and engaging, 2. Built in student choice, 3. Related to this week’s material. The labs are effective at engaging the students in problem solving and conceptual understanding. Merrell used this type of lab as a high school teacher and physics quickly became one of the most popular classes in the school. Adams, inspired by Merrell, has found that her college students no longer rush to leave, and in some cases stay to see how other groups do even after they’ve turned in their lab write up for the day! This workshop will allow you to try out these labs for yourself.

    W08: Integration of Engineering into High School Physics

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kathy Harper

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Mary B. Whalen, Douglas R. Forrest

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    Engineering is a career option that many students in high school physics courses consider, but may not know much about. Further, with the emergence of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), schools are being urged to include more engineering content in their offerings. While there are programs and curricula available to base free-standing engineering courses upon, a separate engineering course is frequently not an option for many high schools. This workshop presents options for incorporating aspects of engineering design into existing physics courses, largely by exploring ways of modifying existing course elements. Participants will gain an understanding of engineering design processes, experience some design activities, and share a variety of ideas for weaving engineering into physics instruction.

    W09: Exploring Physics through the Lens of Systems

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kelly O'Shea

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    In physics, we often just focus on the forces or motion of one object that we treat as a dot. But real objects are more complicated, and every object can be thought of as part of a large system. Learning to think in terms of multiple systems can help students see problems from multiple perspectives or at multiple scales, allowing them to find new insights or simplify their work. In this workshop, we will explore the concept of systems and system models. This NGSS crosscutting concept can be integrated into the four fundamental models of introductory physics (kinematics, forces, energy, and momentum) with small changes or additions that help students think in terms of systems. We will explore using systems thinking in the four models through labs, problems, and discussions. Thinking in terms of systems will even allow us to naturally develop the idea of center of mass. Although we hope that this workshop will be interesting to a wide audience, our target audience is high school teachers.

    W10: Classroom Activities with Black Holes in LIGO Data

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jonah B. Kanner

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Amber Stuver

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 60
    • Available: 60

    Do you want to hear what it sounds like when black holes collide? This workshop will show you how you can use gravitational wave observations in your physics classroom. LIGO and Virgo are currently observing mergers of binary black holes and binary neutron stars. These events – and the signals they produce – can be connected to a range of introductory physics concepts, including wave mechanics, circular motion, Newtonian gravity, and conservation of energy. LIGO and Virgo – the world’s leading gravitational wave observatories – make their data publicly available through a web portal. Bring your laptop, and we’ll use python scripts to download and plot real gravitational-wave signals. Then we’ll explore the physics curriculum learning outcomes that can be demonstrated through these exciting astrophysical events. Workshop take-aways will include activities you can use in class appropriate for both high school or college physics students.

    W11: Examining the Relationships Among Intuition, Reasoning, and Conceptual Understanding in Physics

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Beth Lindsey

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Andrew Boudreaux, Paula R. L. Heron, Mila Kryjevskaia, MacKenzie Stetzer

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 40

    We have been investigating the relationships among students' intuition, reasoning, and conceptual understanding in physics. A major part of this project has been the development of assessment tasks and methods for disentangling conceptual understanding and reasoning. We have drawn on dual-process theories of reasoning from cognitive science in the interpretation of student learning data, and the development of instructional interventions to improve student reasoning. In this workshop, participants will engage with these issues by examining written student responses and viewing and discussing video. We will present curricular interventions developed in alignment with dual-process theories and will describe a framework that can be used for the development of additional interventions.

    W12: Technical Competencies in Laboratory Courses

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Randy Tagg

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Kris Bunker, Devin Pace

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    How can physics students develop a repertoire of practical knowledge useful in research and industrial jobs in a way that is enriched by physics concepts and modeling? Five examples of apparatus and procedures will show, through hands-on activity and a common Jupyter-notebook based instructional format, how physics students can acquire technical competencies in design and instrumentation. A materials-testing apparatus shows how to use a lead screw mechanism, a load-cell force transducer, resistive position transducer, and computer data acquisition module to measure stress versus strain in a pulled wire. A vortex-cooler shows uses thermocouples and air-flow measurement to show how compressed air can be used to produce surprisingly low temperatures. A nine-degree-of-freedom sensor and Arduino-like microcontroller are assembled into a portable and customizable data-logger for recording motion in various situations. A DC motor testing setup integrates a wide variety of technical devices to show how to control motors with pulse-width modulation and to measure the torque, speed, and average applied voltage. Finally, an advanced competency using the Wien-bridge oscillator develops first-principles understanding of how self-sustained electronic oscillation arises as a dynamical bifurcation and how this knowledge connects with both research and practical applications.

    W13: Group-worthy Tasks

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kelly O'Shea

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    Students often learn and work in groups, and scientists also work in teams. How can we make sure that the tasks we give students are really group-worthy? In Designing Groupwork: Strategies for the Heterogeneous Classroom, a group-worthy task is defined as one that is open-ended, provides multiple entry points and multiple ways to demonstrate knowledge, and requires positive interdependence from students. Because group-worthy tasks emphasize the value of multiple abilities and a range of approaches to a problem, they provide the opportunity for all students to engage deeply and meaningfully with the content. These types of tasks also often meet many of the NGSS Science and Engineering Practices. In this workshop, we will discuss characteristics of group-worthy tasks and share tasks that the presenters have used. Participants will also have the opportunity to work on adapting and applying these ideas for their own classrooms. Although we hope that this workshop will be interesting to a wide audience, our target audience is high school teachers.

    W14: New Ways to Visualize Astronomy: Tactile Graphics & 3D Printing

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Thomas Madura

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    Learn how to incorporate 3D printing technologies and 3D models into your physics and/or astronomy classes to enhance student learning. The rise of 3D printing in science education can be understood by examining the skills developed during hands-on activities, including problem-solving, critical and spatial thinking, patience, and resilience. Research suggests student-developed models encourage discussion and a more in-depth learning of science content. Students’ 3D models can also represent their scientific understanding at a specific point in time, helping provide a physical portfolio of science learning. Workshop participants will learn about 3D printing technologies, explore a variety of example 3D-printed models and associated activities, and learn ways to find, design, and 3D print 3D models. Examples from astronomy will include 3D constellations, stars, stellar evolution, planets, galaxies, and more. Finally, participants will learn how 3D printing and tactile learning are especially beneficial for students with blindness/visual impairments. Most available software and model files are free, and no prior experience is necessary.

    W15: Get the Facts Out: Changing the Conversation Around Physics Teacher Recruitment

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Drew Isola

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Wendy Adams

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    In this workshop we will share strategies and resources for recruiting students into physics, chemistry, math and general science teaching careers. The strategies include how to talk to students, listing of venues for reaching students, and recommendations for developing a local campaign. The online resources provided include student presentations, posters, brochures, program flyer templates and presentations for faculty and staff who advise students. All materials are professional quality, research-based and have been extensively user-tested. These materials have been developed as part of Get the Facts Out, an NSF funded project for changing the conversation around STEM teaching recruitment. The project is a partnership between the American Physical Society, American Chemical Society, the Mathematics Association of America, and AAPT led by the Colorado School of Mines. This workshop is fully funded by NSF #1821710 & 1821462. Participants who complete this workshop can be reimbursed for their workshop registration fee.

    W16: Integrating Computation into Introductory Courses with PICUP

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Larry Engelhardt

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Danny Caballero, Marie Lopez del Puerto, Kelly Roos

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    In this workshop, we will show you some ways in which computation can be integrated into your introductory courses. The PICUP partnership has developed a variety of computational activities for introductory physics, and we will show you how you can take these PICUP materials and adapt them to fit your needs. PLEASE BRING A LAPTOP COMPUTER. In this workshop, we will focus on computational activities using spreadsheets and web-based “Trinkets” so you do not need to have any specialized software installed. Participants who participate fully in the workshop can receive a $60 grant-funded rebate. This workshop is funded by the National Science Foundation under DUE IUSE grants 1524128, 1524493, 1524963, 1525062, and 1525525.

    W17: (Cancelled) Introduction to SMT Circuit Board Assembly

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Eric Ayars

    Cost

    • Members: $85
    • Non-members: $110

    Seats

    • Max: 12
    • Available: 12

    With the right tools, surface-mount assembly can be easier than traditional through-hole electronics fabrication. This workshop will present tips and techniques for what works and what to avoid in SMT hand-assembly. Participants will also have opportunity to assemble their own SMT circuitboard -- a chaotic circuit appropriate for use in Advanced Lab.

    W18: Introducing Students to Formulating and Testing Hypotheses via Abstract Strategy Games

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    David Maloney

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 28
    • Available: 28

    In this workshop participants will explore two activities using abstract strategy games that introduce students to the scientifically important processes of formulating and testing hypotheses. Since almost all students have experience playing games this approach to having students engage in these reasoning processes is more “user-friendly” than having them engage with physics content. In addition using abstract strategy games allows for comparisons in how the processes work in different knowledge domains. These activities also help students become comfortable actively working in groups for interactive engagement courses. After exploring both activities the workshop will close with a general discussion of how such activities and the nature of science might fit into various courses. Participants will be given an extended set of materials for each of the two activities.

    W19: Improving Pedagogical Content Knowledge

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Alex Maries

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 40

    Being aware of common student alternate conceptions in physics is beneficial when designing instruction to help students develop a coherent knowledge structure. It is thus not surprising that knowledge of common student difficulties is one aspect of what Shulman coined “pedagogical content knowledge”, or in other words, knowledge about how to teach a subject that is different from the content knowledge itself. This workshop will first explore the literature on the extent to which TAs (undergraduate and graduate students teaching labs and recitations) and instructors are aware of various introductory student alternate conceptions. Participants will identify common alternate conceptions of students in certain question and discuss potential uses in a professional development class. In addition, participants will discuss productive approaches to help both TAs and instructors learn about these alternate conceptions and integrate this knowledge into their pedagogical design.

    W20: Teaching Physics in an E/S Sci context

  • Date/Time

    • Sat, Jul 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Shannon Willoughby

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Darsa Donelan

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 25

    Join this fully reimbursable workshop to engage in hands-on activities appropriate for high school and introductory college physics and astronomy teachers who want to teach with integration and authentic NASA data. Attendees will gain firsthand experience with—and take with them—resources developed and tested by physics education researchers through the NASA Space Science Education Consortium, including labs, lecture tutorials, clicker questions, and diagnostic assessments. These materials address topics that integrate Physics, Earth Science, and Space Science, including (1) coronal mass ejection videos to understand both simple mechanics as well as accelerations of relativistic particles, (2) sunspot data to understand period and frequency, (3) eclipses to understand geometric optics, and (4) auroral currents to understand electromagnetism. (This workshop is fully funded by a NASA Grant/Cooperative Agreement Number NNX16AR36A awarded to Temple University and the AAPT. Participants who complete the workshop may seek full reimbursement of their workshop registration fee.)

    W21: Using Astronomy Demonstration Videos

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kevin Lee/E. Welch

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Emily Welch

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    This project is developing a series of more than 40 videos centered on physical demonstrations that are ideal for use in introductory astronomy and physics courses. They can be utilized in the classroom, in homework and in distance education courses. Interactive materials accompany or are incorporated into many videos, consistent with the recommendations of educational research to maximize student learning from demonstrations. These videos are hosted on YouTube and on the Astronomy Education web site at the University of Nebraska, a site that is widely-used by astronomy educators. Workshop participants will be exposed to the underlying pedagogy of the videos and then experience them first in the role of the student and then in the role of instructor. This project is funded by NSF award #1245679. All registrants will be reimbursed $30 after the workshop has been completed. Participants are expected to bring their own laptop computer.

    W22: Low-stakes Writing in the Physics Classroom

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kris Lui

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    Participants will learn about writing as a tool to support learning through inquiry. They will design at least one writing-to-learn assignment that supports a course topic or student outcome in their courses, including instructions to students, and a rubric for evaluation.

    W23: Activities from the Living Physics Portal

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Nancy Beverly and Sam McKagan

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 25

    Join other highly engaged physics instructors in exploring, re-thinking and adapting introductory physics activities and assignments for health science and life science students to emphasize interdisciplinary connections. Participants will be exposed to practical changes they can implement at their home institutions that put students’ experiences at the center of classroom interactions. Participants will join a growing network of physics instructors who share curricular materials and troubleshoot instructional challenges through the Living Physics Portal. Participants will use the Portal to share resources and collaborate with other physics educators. Instructors, lab managers, & community college faculty and those with varying degrees of familiarity with physics for life scientists or active learning are welcome! The goals of the workshop are to enable and excite participants to (a) make curricular or lab changes, (b) focus on students’ experiences and learning, and (c) make physics personally meaningful and coherent with students’ other STEM knowledge.

    W24: Inexpensive Do It Yourself Gamma Ray Detectors

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Ian Bearden

    Cost

    • Members: $160
    • Non-members: $185

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    In this workshop, participants will learn to assemble a gamma ray detector, comprised of a LYSO scintillator coupled to a Silicon Photomultiplier, and to use the detector for a number of experimental activities for students from high school to graduate school. Once the detector is operational, participants will begin to take data, both from the slightly radioactive LYSO scintillation crystal itself and available gamma ray sources. We estimate that it should take roughly 90 minutes to assemble, test, take and then analyze data with the detector. The remaining time will be devoted to discussing details of the detector design, possible improvements, and to a discussion of how such a tool might be useful in teaching and outreach activities. Finally, we will participants will use two detectors in coincidence to build a (very small!) PET scanner. At the end of the workshop, each participant will have a working gamma spectrometer to take home. Participants should bring their computer, preferably with Jupyter notebook installed.

    W25: SciServer Compute: Browser-based Big Data in the Classroom

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Richard Gelderman

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 25

    Programming skills are increasingly required for jobs in and out of STEM fields, but several high barriers to entry to both teachers and students make it difficult to teach those skills effectively. Setting up, configuring, and learning the required languages and environments can be expensive, time-consuming, and difficult – before students are able to write even a single line of code. This workshop will present a simple, free solution to these challenges with SciServer.org, a science platform that offers free online access to dozens of very large datasets from all areas of science. The heart of SciServer is SciServer Compute, an online environment where students can run Python, R, or Matlab scripts online. Compute works entirely within a web browser, so students do not need to download and install software, read instructions, test connections, and set up packages – they can immediately begin doing meaningful scientific analysis using modern programming languages such as Python. Students write programs in online “notebooks” that perform all analysis and visualization online, on servers hosted at Johns Hopkins University. In this workshop, participants will use SciServer.org to develop and run a set of Python notebooks to analyze a variety of modern scientific datasets drawn from physics and astronomy. Template notebooks will be available during and after the workshop. Participants should bring their own laptops.

    W26: Coding Integration in High School Physics and Physical Science

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Chris Orban

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Richelle Teeling-Smith

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    Ever wondered how to integrate a little bit of coding into a high school physics class without overwhelming your students or taking up lots of class time? This hands on workshop will provide an overview of simple, conceptually-motivated exercises where students construct games like asteroids and angry birds using a free in-browser editor that works great on chromebooks or whatever devices you have. Following that we will show you how to use stemcoding.osu.edu which is a free "learning management system" that is designed to facilitate using coding activities in sizable classes. This framework also includes assessment questions designed to probe whether students are building their conceptual knowledge as they complete the activities. We will share with you a full set of lesson guides and solutions for over 17 different simple coding activities for high school physics and physical science, all of which produce PhET-like interactives. If you have enjoyed seeing coding tutorial videos on the STEMcoding youtube channel (http://youtube.com/c/STEMcoding ) here is your chance to do a deep dive! The STEMcoding project is led by Prof. Chris Orban from Ohio State Physics and Prof. Richelle Teeling-Smith in the physics department at the University of Mt. Union. The STEMcoding project is supported in part by the 2017 AIP Meggers Project Award.

    W27: Machine Learning in PER

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Rachel Henderson

    Co-Organizer(s)

    John Aiken, Nicholas Young, Danny Caballero

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Physics Education Research has long collected quantitative data sets. These data sets have been traditionally examined using descriptive statistics and classical analysis frameworks. Machine learning has expanded the traditional analysis toolbox by adding tools that are more adept at examining data commonly collected in PER (e.g., categorical data, text data, social network data). The University of Oslo/Michigan State University joint Learning Machines Lab (http://learningmachineslab.github.io) has created a collection of Jupyter notebooks that introduce researchers in DBER to machine learning. This workshop will bridge the gap between the traditional quantitative data sets collected by PER and new machine learning tools available in the python programming environment. Participants will be exposed to various modeling techniques (regression and classification) and will participate in a group research project using real PER data. Participants should bring a laptop with Anaconda Python 3.x installed.

    W28: Modifying Introductory Labs to Target Scientific Reasoning and Decision-Making Abilities

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kathy Koenig

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Krista E. Wood, Lei Bao

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    Scientific reasoning has been emphasized as a core ability of 21st Century education. Over the past decade, we have developed and evaluated a complete inquiry-based lab curriculum that explicitly promotes essential reasoning abilities for scientific inquiry, critical thinking, and decision-making. Activities engage students in designing and conducting controlled experiments, making appropriate decisions, conducting data analysis, and engaging in interpretation and synthesis of results to construct meaningful evidence-based claims. The full semester curriculum aligns with the AAPT Lab Guidelines and cultivates an inclusive culture to support a diverse population. All lab activities are grounded in a curricular framework based on operationally defined SR sub-skills; including controlling variables in multi-variable contexts, data analytics, and causal reasoning. During the workshop, participants will work through several lab activities to learn about the underlying framework and how it can be applied using a holistic, scaffolded approach to design reasoning-targeted instruction. Participants will learn how assessments can be used to measure important skills-based outcomes, and our own results will be shared. Participants will be provided with access to all lab materials and assessments, as well as gain an understanding for how to modify their existing labs to reduce costs for new equipment. *Supported by NSF DUE 1431908

    W29: Fillip The Physics Classroom! A How to Guide to Making your own Flipped Instructional Videos

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Venessa Wentzloff

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Ever wondered what it would be like to try to flip the instruction in your classroom? This workshop will explore the benefits and approaches to flipping your physics instruction AND will help you make your first flipping instructional videos. Come ready with a lesson topic and your best video persona and leave with a new skill and a starter video. Participants must bring their own iPad, or laptop.

    W30: Updates to AP Physics

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Angela Jensvold

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    This session will support the AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2, AP Physics C – Mechanics and AP Physics C – Electricity and Magnetism courses and consist of three distinct sessions: 1) Updates to the Course, 2) The Exam, and 3) New Resources. Each session will provide participants with opportunities to share challenges and successes in implementing the resources, as well as learn of instructional strategies and approaches for enhanced teaching and learning. At the end of each session, presenters and participants will engage in Q&A.

    W31: An Introduction to Data Science for Emerging Quantitative Researchers with R-Studio

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jayson Nissen

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Daryl McPadden, John Buncher, Rachel Henderson, Bud Talbot

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 50
    • Available: 50

    This workshop covers statistical tests for comparing two groups and a process for learning new statistical methods by applying these methods to common tasks in physics education research. The application, interpretation and limitations of common inferential tests will be emphasized by focusing on developing a conceptual understanding of variance in data, visualizations that account for variance, and the relationships between variance, effect sizes, and p-values. Participants will work in small groups with facilitators and participate in larger group discussions. They will compare scores on concept inventories and responses to a multiple-choice question using parametric tests for interval and ratio scale data and nonparametric tests for ordinal and nominal data. To facilitate these conversations, we will provide a working file in RStudio; however, participants do not need any prior experience with statistics or with RStudio. We invite more advanced RStudio users and quantitative researchers to participate and to support other participants. By focusing on the process for learning new statistical methods, participants will leave with skills and resources to conduct, evaluate, and report their own analyses.

    W32: Intro Labs to Teach Critical Thinking and Experimentation

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Natasha Holmes

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    In this hands-on, minds-on workshop, participants will discuss ways of structuring labs to teach students about physics as an experimental science. Participants will experience an instructional framework for teaching critical thinking. We’ll explore methods for teaching scientific practices such as uncertainty and data analysis, modeling, and experimental design, while also exposing students to the creativity and excitement of physics experimentation and exploring the nature of science and measurement. We aim for participants to leave the workshop with tools, ideas, and structure to implement the approach in their own courses. Many examples will come from the introductory college level, but the instructional strategies are applicable from high school to upper-division labs.

    W33: Teaching Physics towards Social Justice

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Rifkin, Moses

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Abigail Daane, Danny Doucette, Andrew Morrison, Johan Tabora

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    Motivated by our shared desire to address under-representation in physics and support systemically marginalized groups, we have created a flexible, modular curriculum designed to help physics instructors bring conversations about science and society into our classrooms. Topics include: under-representation in STEM, systemic racism, implicit bias, stereotype threat, and the myth of meritocracy in a physics context. Attendees will experience the curriculum first-hand, and learn how to implement it in their own classrooms.

    W34: Developing the Next Generation of Physics Assessments

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    James Laverty

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 40

    Want to write assessments that will give you more evidence about what your students are actually able to do with their physics knowledge? If so, then this is the workshop for you. Participants will learn how to use the Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol (3D-LAP; a research-based protocol) to develop in-class, homework, and exam problems that engage students in both the process and content of physics. This instrument was developed to help assessment authors at all levels generate questions that include scientific practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas, the three dimensions used to develop the Next Generation Science Standards. Join us to learn how to create the next generation of physics assessments.

    W35: Moving Towards Accessibility in Physics Education with Universal Design for Learning

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jacquelyn J. Chini

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Erin Scanlon, Westley James

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    This workshop will introduce participants to the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework as a tool to design instruction and curricula that support variation in learners’ needs, abilities and interests, with specific focus on students with disabilities. The UDL guidelines emphasize providing supports and options for how students receive information (representation), demonstrate their understanding (action and expression), and engage with the content (engagement). Research shows that popular physics curricula do not enact many UDL-aligned practices. Attendees will have the opportunity to: 1) reflect on the impact of ableism on physics culture; 2) reflect on their role in designing instruction that supports students with disabilities; 3) practice applying the guidelines to identify barriers in the learning environment and to design options and supports in sample written curricula and instructional scenarios; 4) reflect on their own written curricula and/or classroom practices and design UDL-aligned strategies to implement; and 5) contribute to a list of resources for continuing to plan and implement strategies to make their instruction more accessible. This workshop will be appropriate for high school teachers, college/university instructors, and curriculum developers. Workshop content will incorporate views of students with disabilities about student-centered active learning STEM courses.

    W36: Work and Energy Workshops

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    John Stewart

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    Energy and systems are fundamental, crosscutting science concepts, and physics is the place to help students develop a deeper conceptual understanding. However, students hear what we say, not what we mean! Trying to simplify our discussions of work and energy (particularly potential energy) can generate increased confusion. What could be a single approach to solving a wide variety of problems becomes compartmentalized into many special cases to be memorized. What we mean is so clear to those of us “in the club” that assessments are not always designed to elicit the incorrect models many students hold. In Learning and Understanding (2002), the National Research Council presented design principles vital to improving the effectiveness of AP and introductory college courses in the U.S. Focusing on key ideas and providing ample opportunities to explore them in depth is one recommendation perfectly served by a more careful approach to energy and systems. We will look at a few examples of how common wording can generate incorrect models, and then spend our time considering how to help our students develop a single coherent conceptual model that significantly impacts their ability to use more robust problem-solving approaches and to describe and model physical situations.

    W37: Using RTOP to Improve Physics and Physical Science Teaching

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kathleen Falconer

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Daniel MacIsaac

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 25

    The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) is a 25-item rubric that provides a percentile measure of the degree and type of student-centered, constructiv-ist, inquiry-based, engagement in an instructional situation. RTOP scores correlate very highly with student conceptual gains. In this workshop, we will score video vignettes of teaching to learn how to use RTOP for guiding personal reflection and improvement and change of our own teaching; for mentoring peers, novice teachers and student teachers; and to establish a vocabulary for discussing reformed teaching practices. If you wish, you may bring a dvd of your own teaching to score.

    W38: World Wide Data Day - LHC in your classroom

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Shane Wood

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Kenneth Cecire

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    If you have computers and internet in your school, you can bring data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to your classroom. World Wide Data Day (W2D2) is an annual activity in which teachers and students do an analysis of muon tracks in LHC that is designed to be done in 2 class periods with or without outside assistance. On the day itself, classes at schools all over the world have videoconferences with particle physicists to discuss the results. Learn how to implement the W2D2 measurements in your classroom and get your school involved. Bring your laptop!

    W39: Intermediate and Advanced Laboratories

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jeremiah Williams

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    This workshop is appropriate for college and university instructional laboratory developers. At each of five stations, presenters will demonstrate an approach to an intermediate or advanced laboratory exercise. Each presenter will show and discuss the apparatus and techniques used. Attendees will cycle through the stations and have an opportunity to use each apparatus. Documentation will be provided for each experiment, with sample data, equipment lists, and construction or purchase information.

    W40: Interactive Video-Enhanced Tutorials

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Bob Teese

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Kathleen Koenig, Alexandru Maries and Michelle Chabot

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    Problem solving abilities are critical for success in physics. If you would like to use, beta-test or develop new, effective online problem-solving tutorials, this workshop is for you. The workshop will introduce Interactive Video-Enhanced Tutorials (IVETs), which are based on multimedia learning principles and research on human learning and memory. Each tutorial is focused on an important problem-solving approach (e.g., energy conservation) in physics. To serve a diverse group of students with different levels of academic preparation, each tutorial provides varying amounts and types of support depending on students' needs. The support is delivered through mini-lectures, hints, tips or encouragement (affect) by a tutor (a real person in a video). Students who struggle will receive more guidance, while confident students can navigate through the tutorial at a faster pace. Using an IVET will be similar in certain respects to having a live tutor. IVETs use the same software as Interactive Video Vignettes (compadre.org/IVV). Our ivet.rit.edu/IVET website has sample IVETs you can try. Workshop participants will learn how to incorporate existing IVETs into their courses. They will also learn best practices for creating their own effective tutorials using free Vignette Studio software. Supported by NSF DUE-1821391 and DUE-1821396.

    W41: Integrating Computation into Astronomy and Astrophysics with PICUP

  • Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Walter Freeman

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Astronomy/astrophysics courses present unique challenges and opportunities when using computational methods in the classroom. Astronomy is inherently visual, so animation and visualization can greatly facilitate students' understanding of astrophysical systems. Likewise, there are great opportunities for data reduction and analysis in astrophysics. Even though many students in introductory astronomy classes have little mathematical knowledge and no exposure to code, computation and simulation can be used effectively in these courses to expose students to the physical underpinnings of planetary motion without requiring them to learn numerical methods or how to code from scratch. This workshop will explore ways to integrate computation into astronomy/astrophysics classes to enhance students' understanding of both astronomy and how computational methods are used in physics.

    W42: Bringing Amateur HAM Radio Into Your Instruction

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jul 19
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Reed Prior

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 25

    Amateur ("Ham") Radio is a technological hobby employing electronic communications over great distances by hobbyists using radio waves. It has been popular for over 100 years, and it remains so today in every nation of the world. There are over 3 million licensed Ham Radio operators worldwide. Since the advent of internet and cell communications, younger generations of students have been less exposed to this hobby, and many teachers and students alike have never heard of it. Yet, once introduced to Ham Radio operations at, for example, a school station (typically located in a classroom or lab setting), many students often become fascinated and engaged. The hobby attracts both those interested in telecommunications technologies and E&M physics, as well as those less technical types who are more interested in speaking directly with countless others in countries and from cultures far away. This workshop with introduce you to Ham Radio, show you why it is so fascinating (even in today's internet-driven world), show you the ins and outs of obtaining operating licenses, and give advice on setting up a station in your institution. Additional topics will cover integration of the hobby into various course curricula at both the high school and college level.

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