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2017 Winter Meeting Workshops

Listed below is a current list of workshops planned for the 2017 Winter Meeting. It is recommended that you register early for your workshops. Some workshops will fill-up early and others may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Some details are subject to change.

Location

Most workshops and tutorials will be held at Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). Click here to view a map of campus.  W15 will be held at Spelman and some tutorials will be held at the conference hotel, the Marriott Marquis Atlanta (T02, T03 and T04). Please be sure to check the program book before you board the bus.

Registration

You must pick-up your registration packet at the AAPT registration desk at the Marriott Marquis Atlanta before heading to the University. You will not be allowed on the bus unless you are confirmed for a workshop.

Transportation

Transportation will be provided. Buses will depart the Marriott on the International Level at the Courtland Street Exit. Please click here for a shuttle bus schedule.

Campus Map

Please click here for a map of campus identifying workshop building.  

  

 

Sort by: Title Date

  • T01: Using a Planetarium for Teaching and Outreach

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 08:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

    Organizer

    Philip Groce

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 23

    Planetariums in both formal and informal educational institutions have been used to teach and inspire students and the general public about the physical nature of the universe. Planetariums have the unique ability to illustrate astronomy and physics concepts that are difficult, if not impossible in the classroom. Participants in this workshop will discover though live presentations and hands-on operation better teaching methods through the use of planetariums. This workshop will use the August 21, 2017 Great American Solar Eclipse as the focus subject. A few of the goals of the workshop are: • To provide a participatory and practical professional development opportunity focusing on presentations about this 2017 Total Solar Eclipse. • To share information about available resources and products for this Eclipse. • To demonstrate the multi-disciplinary nature of planetariums. For instance, in addition to the physics and geometry of this eclipse, observations of changes in animal behavior during an eclipse can lead to better understanding of "light-dark" behavior in animals.

  • T02: Electrostatics Tutorial

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 09:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

    Organizer

    Robert Morse

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 12
    • Available: 4

    With inexpensive equipment, students can carry out activities to build a conceptual understanding of electrostatic phenomena. In this short tutorial we will build the equipment and learn to carry out experiments patterned after those from William Gilbert to Alessandro Volta, including charge detection, electric field patterns and electrostatic induction.

  • T03: Tools for Undergraduates Conducting Outreach

    Date/Time

    • Mon, Feb 20
    • 03:30 p.m. - 05:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Brad Conrad

    Cost

    • Members: $0
    • Non-members: $0

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 24

    In this tutorial, students will be introduced to the best practices for outreach activities to a wide variety of audiences. Methods will focus on communication with groups of children and the general public. Activities will be demonstrated and discussed and will focus on interactive examples and a physics demonstration kit developed by the Society of Physics Students. The overall goal is to encourage student groups to conduct outreach at schools and give the presenters the tools and knowledge to do so effectively.

  • T04: Preparing for the 2017 Solar Eclipse

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 09:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Toby Dittrich

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Jay Pasachoff

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 50
    • Available: 32

    The "Great American Eclipse" is coming up on August 21, 2017. This workshop will give you information, and research possibilities to increase the readiness of you and your students to get the most out of this very unusual eclipse. Experiments include a repeat of the Eddington Experiment with dramatically improved accuracy, and experimental observations of the corona. Historical, viewing options, photographic techniques and eclipse safety will be discussed. Co-presenters Toby Dittrich (Portland Community College, Oregon) and Jay Pasachoff (Williams College) will discuss experiments, and other presenters will discuss the variety of topics listed above.

  • W01: Dark Matter and Neutrinos

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Peggy Norris

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 15

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD is hosting some of the world's most sensitive experiments designed to understand some of the mysteries of the universe. We have developed a curriculum unit for middle and high school physical science classes based on learning about dark matter and neutrinos. 'What's the 'Matter' with the Big Bang" is appropriate for both formal and informal education settings, aligned to the NGSS standards, and is available free of charge.

  • W02: Everything You Wanted to Know About Using Smartphones in Your Classroom: 10+ Engaging Labs to Teach Mechanics, Sound, Light, E&M, and Modern Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Rebecca Vieyra

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Martin Monteiro, Chrystian Vieyra, Arturo Marti.

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 5

    Attend this workshop to participate in hands-on, engaging inquiry labs suitable for introductory physics courses in high school and college. Use your own Android or iOS smartphone or tablet - or borrow one from us - to perform both classic and novel lab experiments using free apps in the areas of (1) mechanics, (2) sound, (3) light, (4) electricity and magnetism, and (5) modern physics. In this workshop, we will show some of the capabilities of mobile devices and do experiments recently proposed in the literature, especially from The Physics Teacher’s iPhysicsLab column. The population of mobile device users around the world is growing exponentially, yet their primary use is still communication. Strikingly, smartphones incorporate an increasing number of sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, magnetometers, and pressure, light, and proximity sensors, among others (GPS, hygrometers, UV detectors, thermometers, heart-rate monitors, and even blood oxygenation levels). You will walk away from this workshop experience with 10+ lesson ideas and sets of accompanying student teaching materials. In advance of the workshop, registrants will be provided with an optional tutorial and webinar gathering to learn about the basics of using your mobile device’s internal sensors with freely available apps.

  • W03: Making Physics Videos with iPads

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dan MacIsaac

    Co-Organizer(s)

    André Bresges, Florian Genz, David Abbott, Kathleen Falconer, Brad Gearhart, Joey Heimburger and Andrew Roberts

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 17

    Participants will learn how to make short physics video vignettes for learning purposes using modern tablets with low cost applets. Participants will view examples, learn and practice how to plan, storyboard, shoot, simply animate, edit, caption and voiceover videos using tablets. Constructive critiques and guidance will be provided, as well as advice on how to incorporate student video projects into physics classes. We encourage you to come to the workshop prepared with a physics topic of interest to you, and a tablet. Draft videos and storyboards are also welcome -- the more you do in advance the more you can take away from the session. A limited number of loaner iPad tablets will be made available to participants without a device. This project is supported by the NSF, SUNY Buffalo State and the University of Cologne.

  • W04: Maximize Student Interest and Learning

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Matt Bobrowsky

    Cost

    • Members: $135
    • Non-members: $160

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 11

    We now know ways to teach that are much more effective than traditional methods. In this workshop, we will draw from a body of physics education research, which has greatly expanded during the past few decades, to really experience what effective teaching looks like. Take the best parts of progressive inquiry, problem-based learning, project-based learning, collaborative learning, responsive teaching, phenomenon-based learning, role playing, Socratic questioning, just-in-time teaching, and more, and get your students motivated and learning! Teach broader concepts and useful thinking and performance skills (as with NGSS) rather than asking students to simply memorize facts and formulas. In this workshop, you will employ research-based practices that are very effective with diverse learners and that promote science and engineering practices.

  • W05: (Cancelled) Teaching Physics for the First Time

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jan Mader

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Mary Winn, Karen Jo Matsler, Janie Head, Tommi Holsenbeck

    Cost

    • Members: $90
    • Non-members: $115

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 1

    With the push for physics first, many middle school and high school instructors find themselves assigned to teach physical science and physics classes with little or no formal preparation in the content. Teaching Physics for the First Time is designed to provide a supply of lessons based on the learning cycle. Linked to NGSS and common core, these lessons are reliable and cost effective. The labs, demonstrations and activities emphasize the hands-on approach to learning physics concepts and include teaching strategies, literacy connections and address misconceptions students often have with respect to the concept.

  • W06: Classroom Activities that Support the Conceptual Understanding of Magnetism and Quantum Mechanics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Daniel Laumann

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Stefan Heusler

    Cost

    • Members: $85
    • Non-members: $110

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 23

    Teaching magnetism and quantum states at school level is a demanding task, especially without educational materials that are visually appealing and provide a modern and scientifically accurate insight. In this workshop, we present different hands-on approaches for the treatment of dia-, para- and ferromagnetism in schools. The approaches combine professional interactive multimedia content and novel experimental activities based on strong neodymium magnets. Currently, teaching magnetism in school is almost always related to ferro- and electromagnetism. Therefore, the terms magnetism and ferromagnetism are often used synonymously in educational settings. Yet, since only three elements of the periodic table are related to ferromagnetism and the vast majority of elements are dia- or paramagnetic, it is confusing to separate the world in magnetic and non-magnetic substances: Including dia- and paramagnetism, almost ALL elements respond to a magnetic field. Especially dia- and paramagnetism impart fascinating and unexpected magnetic phenomena of everyday materials like water, aluminum or common salt. Additionally, dia- and paramagnetism reveal an excellent possibility to include quantum mechanics as the origin of all types of magnetism in classroom activities. The workshop offers possible ways to impart quantum states within high school education.

  • W07: Atlanta Master Teachers and Their Best Practices

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    David Rosengrant

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Jason Goodman, Jordan Tidrick, Lyric Portwood, Phil Heier, Sarah Eales; Cohort II: Amanda Amos, Berkil Alexander, Bradley Davis, Cheree Vaughn, Justin Harvey, Micah Porter, Philip Matthews, Rachel Washburn, Rebecca Howell, Shelley Howerton, Trevor Register, Warren Collier; Cohort II: Doug Pekkanen, Eden Hunt, Jacquelyn Brennan, Kristen Powell, Tracey Beyer, Naoman Malik, Lindsay Giglio, Yolanda Payton, Philip Money, Beth White

    Cost

    • Members: $110
    • Non-members: $155

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 22

    This workshop will be run by a series of master physics teachers who are all part of a Robert Noyce Scholarship Program through Kennesaw State University. These teachers come together to bring a unique background combining foundations from industry with extensive pedagogical experience. They serve a wide range of students in the Atlanta area and suburbs and are bringing their best teaching practices to this workshop. Topics will include but not limited to: graphical methods of problem solving, designing and implementing video games in the classroom, teaching holistically from scenarios as opposed to separate content areas, diagnosing and addressing students’ preconceived notions, and how to truly assess what it is you are teaching. The workshop will include not only how to implement these strategies but also time to build and create artifacts which you can take home to your own classroom.

  • W08: (Cancelled) Leadership Roles and Models in the Classroom, Academia, and Beyond

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Juan Burciaga

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 3

    As we adopt a more peer-oriented environment for our courses, faculty begin losing their traditional role as leaders in the classroom. In addition, more and more we are asked to participate in bringing about change in our classes and beyond—changes in pedagogy, changes in diversity and inclusion, and even to initiate/participate in research or teaching groups. How do we share the authority of learning in our classes without ceding the final responsibility for that learning? What models of leadership and participation exist that can help us adapt to the changing demands? And how do we model these roles so that students can effectively develop these leadership skills as well? Using discussions, readings, and case studies, we will explore these questions as we attempt to characterize effective leadership and our most appropriate response to the challenges and opportunities of leader- ship demands from our professional lives.

  • W09: (Cancelled) Inexpensive Modern Apparatus

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kenneth Cecire

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 3

    Yes, it is possible to do labs, demos, and student investigations in modern and contemporary physics with equipment that is affordable and accessible. Come and learn how.

  • W10: (Cancelled) Teaching Assistant Preparation

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Michael Schatz

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Emily Alicea-Munoz

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 16
    • Available: 2

    Students in large introductory physics classes spend approximately half of their in-class time (e.g., labs and recitations) supervised by graduate Teaching Assistants (TAs), which means TAs can have a large impact on student learning. Because of this, it is important for physics departments to provide adequate preparation and support for their TAs. This workshop aims to help participants develop/improve their graduate TA preparation efforts by adopting interactive and evidence-based teaching and learning strategies. We will go over the principles of instructional design and how they apply to developing a TA preparation program, methods of program assessment, and ways of providing continuing support for TAs. Participants should bring a laptop.

  • W13: Research-Based Alternatives to Problem Solving in General Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kathy Harper

    Co-Organizer(s)

    David P. Maloney, Thomas M. Foster

    Cost

    • Members: $85
    • Non-members: $110

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 11

    Accumulating research on problem solving in physics clearly indicates that traditional, end-of-chapter exercises in physics texts are not useful and may actually hinder students' learning of important physics concepts. The research also raises questions about the efficacy of such tasks for helping students develop "problem solving skills." In light of these results the question is: What alternative tasks can we use to help students develop problem solving skills and a conceptual understanding? This workshop will review the research and then provide examples of several alternative tasks and their use. Participants will also get practice writing alternative problems in a variety of formats for use in their own classrooms.

  • W14: Developing Inquiry Labs for AP Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Shelly Strand

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Dolores Gende, Becca Howell

    Cost

    • Members: $105
    • Non-members: $130

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 13

    Participants will be able to work through several inquiry based labs for AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2 and AP Physics C (Mechanics and Electricity & Magnetism).

  • W15: Trans-Disciplinary Project-Based Instruction in Biology and Physics at Spelman College

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 10:00 a.m. - 04:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Natarajan Ravi

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Derrick Hylton, Michael Burns-Kaurin, Michael McGinnis, Rosalind Bass, Marta Dark, Christopher Oakley, Mentewab Ayalew.

    Cost

    • Members: $25
    • Non-members: $35

    Seats

    • Max: 50
    • Available: 40

    The Physics and Biology Departments at Spelman College have worked together to reform physics instruction to biology, health sciences, and environmental science majors. We have introduced project-based modules linked across introductory biology and physics courses, as well as advanced biology courses. In this workshop, we will present our implementation strategies and introduce two of our projects pertaining to fluids and circuits. Concepts of fluids are introduced in the context of the circulatory system. In the biology course, students use complex arrangements of tubes to simulate various medical conditions and qualitatively study effects on pressure differences. In the physics course, students examine possible "designs" of a circulatory system, with the lab work focused on using one-tube systems to study the factors that influence flow rate for a particular pressure difference. Circuit concepts are introduced in the context of students developing a circuit model of the neuronal action potential. In the biology course, students learn the actual phenomenon via analogies and a software simulation where they can test the effects of circuit parameters. In the physics course, they design the circuit model, learn about circuit theory and components, and build and test the various designs. Participants will work through activities from these courses that show how physical models can be used to present an interdisciplinary approach to learning science. The morning session will focus on the fluids project and the afternoon session will focus on the circuitry project. The wrap-up will include a discussion of the extension of these projects to advanced biology courses. This workshop will include lunch and transportation for the Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel.

  • W17: (Cancelled) Modeling in the Lab

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Yongkang Le

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 16
    • Available: 4

    In the “AAPT Recommendations for the Undergraduate Physics Laboratory Curriculum” released in 2014, modeling is considered to be one of the six key focus areas of the undergraduate lab curriculum learning outcomes. In a teaching lab, students operate the device and get their data following the guidance of a lab manual. They try to evaluate and understand their results. Possibly, they even have to eliminate troubles they confronted during the lab. We also hope that they can design labs independently in upper level lab courses. Modeling is a fundamental skill supporting all the above processes. In this workshop, we will work in groups on two specially designed teaching labs, namely troubleshooting a Wheatstone bridge and measuring the capacitance of a parallel-plate capacitor, to see how modeling-based labs can facilitate student development. Participants are encouraged to suggest labs for discussion. Prof. Yongkang Le is the director of the physics teaching lab at Fudan University, which is one of the leading physics teaching labs in China. Prof. Le has been supervising lab courses at all levels and mentored many open-end projects. He has expertise on how to help students be more efficient during labs.

  • W18: Fun and Engaging Labs

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Wendy Adams

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Duane Merrell

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 15

    In this workshop we will share many labs that are suitable for both high school and introductory college physics. The labs are challenging but not too difficult and, leave plenty of room for creativity! We have found success by limiting the goals for the labs to: 1. Fun and engaging, 2. Built in student choice, 3. Related to this week’s material. The labs are effective at engaging the students in problem solving and conceptual understanding. Merrell used this type of lab as a high school teacher and physics quickly became one of the most popular classes in the school. Adams, inspired by Merrell, has found that her college students no longer rush to leave, and in some cases stay to see how other groups do even after they’ve turned in their lab write up for the day! This workshop will allow you to try out these labs for yourself.

  • W19: Fun, Engaging and Effective Labs and Demos in Electricity and Magnetism and Optics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    David Sokoloff

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Ronald Thornton, Priscilla Laws

    Cost

    • Members: $75
    • Non-members: $100

    Seats

    • Max: 16
    • Available: 0

    RealTime Physics and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations have been available for over 15 years—so what’s new? Participants in this workshop will have hands-on experience with some of the activities in RTP and ILD using clickers, video analysis and computer-based tools to teach electricity, magnetism and optics. These active learning approaches for lectures, labs, and recitations (tutorials) are fun, engaging and validated by physics education research (PER). Research results demonstrating the effectiveness of these curricula will be presented. The following will be distributed: Modules from the Third Edition of RTP, the ILD book, and the Physics with Video Analysis book and CD.

  • W20: (Cancelled) Hooking Kids with Haunted Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jeremy Benson

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Pati Sievert

    Cost

    • Members: $75
    • Non-members: $100

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 1

    We all know, “It’s not magic, it’s physics!” and the curious of all ages are drawn to discover the science behind the mysterious. Whether you are trying to engage your students or attempting to bring the public to campus, not much can beat a Haunted Physics Lab for hooking kids of all ages. Several successful organizers of Haunted Physics Laboratories will set up and share some of their best haunted displays. Having students design and construct displays, then act as docents for younger students can work as young as middle school. In this workshop, you will investigate haunted lab set up, make your own easy-to-pack displays, learn where to purchase the more obscure materials, and receive instructions on constructing large scale displays such as a duck-in-Kaleidoscope and illusions such as the Department Head (minus its body.) Check out just a few pics from one of our presenters http://bit.ly/NIU_HPL

  • W21: Learn To Create Interactive Physics Simulations for Computers, Tablet Devices, and Smart Phones in Just 4 Hours

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Andrew Duffy

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Wolfgang Bauer

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 0

    You will learn how to author you own interactive physics simulations from scratch in HTML5, which is replacing Java and Flash as the dominant programming language of the web. In step-by-step exercises on your laptop computer you will experiment with how to draw and paint on the screen, how to use buttons, input fields, and sliders to allow the users to control your simulation parameters, how to work with images, and how to process mouse, touch, and keyboard inputs. Working step-by-step through instructive examples will allow you to create your own complete interactive simulations, which help your students gain physics insight.

  • W22: Project-based Learning for Introductory Physics for Life Science

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Nancy Beverly

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Nancy Donaldson

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 18

    Project-based learning is particularly valuable for life or health science students as it gives them the experience of recognizing and applying physics in biological scenarios of most interest to them. It can be the vehicle by which the student can pose meaningful inquiry about the physical mechanisms underlying biological or biomedical processes, and make conceptual and mathematical models with articulated limitations for living scenarios. They can analyze data from their self-designed experiments or from literature searches, and with modeling can calculate results for which biological inference can be made . In this workshop you will go through the process of deciding the appropriate learning outcomes, project guidelines, and associated assessment strategies for your particular student population and format, as well as explore many examples of IPLS student projects.

  • W23: Teaching Introductory Astronomy Using Quantitative Reasoning Activities

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Stephanie Slater

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Windsor Morgan

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 27

    In this half-day, participatory workshop specially designed for college introductory astronomy faculty and high school teachers, participants will learn how to use active learning tutorials to develop and enhance students’ quantitative reasoning skills. It has long been recognized that many astronomy students are terrified of courses requiring them to perform what they perceive as being tedious arithmetical calculations. At the same time, few materials exist across the broader astronomy education community to help students overcome their reluctance to engage in mathematical thinking and enjoy success at doing astronomy. Created by teaching-experts affiliated with the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research Team, these active learning tutorials are purposefully designed to support students’ in learning challenging astronomy concepts by introducing short and highly structured quantitative reasoning intervals where students collaboratively wrestle with how to think of astronomy in novel settings. Astronomy education research consistently demonstrates that students significantly increase their understanding of astronomy through the use of collaborative learning materials and that teachers find them easy to implement. Classroom-ready materials will be provided to all participants.

  • W24: Demos for Outreach

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Feb 18
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    David Sturm

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Jerry Hester (and others to-be-determined)

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 50
    • Available: 42

    How do you organize apparatus for Physics on the Road? Structured like PIRA Lecture Demonstration workshops, we invite folks who do, have done, and/or want to do physics outreach to join us for a workshop that focuses on demonstrations for the road. We'll look at a top 50 list. For each, we'll cover design and construction, purchasing, and using existing demonstrations found in many departments. Workshop leaders will discuss organizing using the PIRA DCS. And of course, we'll network, share, and develop plenty of new ideas for cool road show gear.

  • W26: Reaching, Teaching, and Keeping Underrepresented Groups in Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Juan Burciaga

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 8

    The purpose of the workshop is to increase the effectiveness of teachers (K-12) and college faculty in constructing inclusive learning environments in their classrooms and beyond. Workshop participants, using guided discussions and collaborative exercises will explore pedagogical philosophies, outreach paradigms, and assessment strategies that can be adapted to individual uses. Participants will also investigate the factors that can help (or hinder) widespread, permanent change. Though focused particularly on under-represented groups, the workshop is actually geared to making the learning of physics more effective for all students. The pedagogical exercises are built on physics at the senior high school and introductory college level, but teachers in the K-20 educational enterprise may find the workshop useful.

  • W27: Introduction to Arduino - An Underwater Robot Operated Vehicle

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Greg Mulder

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Pat Keefe

    Cost

    • Members: $185
    • Non-members: $210

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 2

    Microcontrollers are relatively inexpensive devices that you can program to collect data from a variety of sensor types and control external devices such as motors and actuators. Microcontrollers can be used in a variety of classroom activities and student projects. We will focus our workshop on using an Arduino Microcontroller to construct a mini-underwater vehicle that will seek out to hover at a desired programmed depth. We will also discuss how our students use Arduinos for fun, research, underwater ROV’s and general exploration. An optional pool-test of your mini-underwater vehicle will occur after the workshop at a nearby hotel pool. Note: you get to keep your mini ROV with Arduino. No previous microcontroller programming or electronics experience is required. You need to bring your own Windows, Mac, or Linux computer.

  • W28: Integrating Computation into Undergraduate Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Larry Engelhardt

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Marie Lopez del Puerto, Kelly Roos, Danny Caballero, Norman Chonacky

    Cost

    • Members: $20
    • Non-members: $45

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 1

    In this workshop we will discuss the importance of integrating computation into the physics curriculum and will guide participants in discussing and planning how they would integrate computation into their courses. The PICUP partnership has developed materials for a variety of physics courses in a variety of platforms including Python/VPython, C/C++, Fortran, MATLAB/Octave, Java, and Mathematica. Participants will receive information on the computational materials that have been developed, will discuss ways to tailor the materials to their own classes, and will learn about opportunities that are available to receive additional support through the PICUP partnership. PLEASE BRING A LAPTOP COMPUTER WITH THE PLATFORM OF YOUR CHOICE INSTALLED. This workshop is funded by the National Science Foundation under DUE IUSE grants 1524128, 1524493, 1524963, 1525062, and 1525525.

  • W29: Low-Cost, At-Home Labs for School-Based or Online Courses

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Alex Burr

    Cost

    • Members: $85
    • Non-members: $110

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 8

    A physics course without experiments is not a physics course. However many instructors teaching in high schools, colleges, and on-line courses feel pressured in terms of money, time, and room to neglect this aspect of physics instruction. This workshop will address these problems. The participants will actually do real experiments which do not have to use expensive, sophisticated equipment. The experiment instructions are simple written notes which do not need class time to explain. The experiments can be done at home or some other place so a laboratory room is not needed. The experiments can be done at several levels so they are appropriate for several types of general physics courses. The experiments can illustrate advanced experimental concepts if you wish but all will show that if you ask questions of nature, she will answer. Topics mentioned include mechanics, electricity, and optics. They will be done individually and in groups. Participants should bring Apple or Android smart phones or tablets if they have them. Participants will leave with inexpensive apparatus, detailed notes, and a renewed commitment to physics as an experimental science.

  • W30: Projects in Physics Beyond Rockets and Rollercoasters

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Amber Henry

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Cori Araza

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 5

    Students learn more when they put the physics they have learned in the classroom to use in hands on projects. The long time favorites of physics classrooms have been pop bottle rockets, mousetrap cars, and roller coasters. While these projects have been staples as more and more middle school teachers utilize these activities they have lost their impact in the high school classroom. This workshop will show you how to expand your projects to include such things as a school garden, 3D printed clocks, maker projects and even how to put the reins in the students hands. Participants will see how these projects can be applied , design and build small projects and work to design some innovative lessons they can apply in their classrooms. Projects will range from those can be implemented in a single day to those that can span a semester.

  • W31: Submitting Competitive Proposals to the NSF IUSE Program

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kevin M. Lee

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 31

    This workshop will provide an overview of the National Science Foundation’s Improving Undergraduate STEM Education Program. We will cover all aspects of its history including the programs that preceded it, their goals, and their evolution over time. A complete description of the present IUSE program and the distinguishing characteristics of grants in today’s physics and astronomy portfolio will be given. We will then explore the process of proposal review and the benefits of reviewing. The characteristics of a good proposal will be analyzed from looking at several project summaries as well as a full proposal. A guest speaker will detail the strategies that led to their submission of a funded IUSE proposal. All topics will be explored through classroom techniques developed for modern interactive teaching. Participants will leave with numerous resources and guidance essential for submitting their own IUSE proposal. Note that participants will be asked to prepare for the workshop beforehand. This preparation will include reading the currently active IUSE solicitation, reading an IUSE proposal, and writing a review of the proposal in preparation for participating in a mock NSF panel exercise. Registrants should be proactive in contacting the workshop organizer to obtain the needed materials.

  • W32: (Cancelled) Using the AIP Teaching Guides on Women and Minorities in the Physical Sciences

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Feb 19
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Connor Day

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Brean Prefontaine, Gregory Good

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 3

    Teachers will be introduced to the teaching materials on the AIP website related to the history of women and minorities in the physical sciences. The purpose of these materials is to help students appreciate that not only white males have contributed to the development of physics, astronomy, and other physical sciences. On the flip side, there have been many more women than Marie Curie and many more African Americans than Benjamin Banneker and Jim Gates who have had successful careers in the physical sciences. We will explore several of the lesson plans in each group and explore games and other activities to bring these lessons to life.

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